Date: 6/29/20 7:17 pm
From: 'Jackie P' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Bird Behavior “Retirement”
Love the conversation, but I will interject: the statement about hunters (even bird hunters) is quite ignorant to the truth - bird hunters have contributed immensely to conservation by improving habitat. In my mind, there are several types of hunters, but do not dismiss them - they have actually contributed more dollars to conservation of land, water, and habitat than any other group of birders out there, and that is actually a fact.

Jackie P.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 29, 2020, at 4:08 PM, Mary Wise <auntyem...> wrote:
>
> 
> Yes, it is correct. I am totally fine with the recent discussion re: house sparrows.
>
> Thanks for checking!
> Mary
>
>> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 10:27 PM <juliet.berger...> wrote:
>> Hello Birders
>> It is my understanding that Bruce Bowman has retired from the moderator job of Birders Listserv and that Washtenaw birder and admin for the Southeast Michigan birders list, Mary Wise, has taken over as our admin. Mary, can you confirm that and let us know your guidelines for conversations on Birders?
>> Thanks
>> Juliet Berger
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>>> On Jun 27, 2020, at 8:51 PM, <fkaluza...> wrote:
>>>>
>>> 
>>> Right on Juliet! I support and commend you for putting this out there and I have never understood the moderator’s objection to those stating scientific facts. In my mind there are three kinds of “birders”.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 1 The conservationist types who enjoy birdwatching as well as who pursue habitat improvements to bolster native species.
>>>
>>> 2 The hard-core “listers” who are simply out to “observe and catalog them all before they are all gone” but could care less about doing anything in the way of improving things.
>>>
>>> 3 The hunters who simply want to kill and eat (or just kill and leave behind or throw away) anything they feel like killing.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> As far as I’m concerned, you can lump types 2 and 3 together. Doing nothing to improve things results in the same outcome as actively diminishing bird numbers. I agree that any and all nest boxes and/or nest box instructions/designs/plans need to coming with statements about responsibility and ethics. With natural cavities disappearing, the future of our cavity nesters is depending more and more on human involvement.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> At one point, the hard-core listers here objected to talk about conservation issues and went off to form their own “bird-listers” email list but…I think conversations about ethics, animal behavior and migration studies got their curiosity up and they stayed on this list as well as their new one. Since the split…the official moderator “Bruce Bowman” has been practically invisible here so…there is a chance we may avoid official sanction from moderators going forward. Hooray for science and common sense.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for caring! 😊
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> From: Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...>
>>> Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2020 3:17 PM
>>> To: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>; <birders...>
>>> Subject: Re: [birders] Bird Behavior “Retirement”
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> There is no reason whatsoever why we cannot discuss how to remove house sparrows from nest sites and your yard. They are an invasive species and kill native birds at an alarming rate.
>>>
>>> They are a major threat to all cavity nesting native species. There are repeating sparrow traps, and nest box trap that can be purchased or made, and used to trap the sparrows. Then you must euthanize the adult sparrows. Repeating traps are best utilized in winter when chipmunks are hibernating, since chipmunks will often get to the bait, millet, before the sparrows find it. Any and all House Sparrow nests should be removed from bird houses. They cannot in any circumstances be allowed to breed in housing we provide. It is unethical to do so. If they find their own nest hole, that cannot be prevented in all cases, but if I put up a bird house, I must be 100% sure that I am not providing House Sparrow nest habitat. Monitor daily, if necessary, and take out messy nests that fill the whole box, which is a House Sparrow nest. Here is a discussion of the different nest types/bird species you may find in a nest box. https://michiganbluebirds.org/resources/other-cavity-nesting-birds The Michigan Bluebird site is a great resource for how to deal with House Sparrows, as well.
>>>
>>> I have said many times, if I had a dollar for every dead tree swallow or bluebird I found killed in the nest box with a House Sparrow nest built on top of the corpse, I would be a wealthy person.
>>>
>>> Take out the House Sparrows, or take down your bird houses. Another option is to convert them to House Wren/Chickadee size holes. 1 1/4 inch holes are for these smaller species. House Sparrows, Eastern Bluebirds and Tree Swallows need at least 1 1/2 inch entry holes.
>>>
>>> All the best, stay well, stay safe and good birding,
>>>
>>> Juliet Berger
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 11:06 AM Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Does anyone know if birds “retire”? Or...will they keep right on trying to raise offspring every year until eventually failing and leaving a clutch of half-developed young in a failed nest? In the past, “my” Tree Swallows have managed to fend off every attack from House Sparrows for several years running. As of yesterday however, I watched HOSPs carrying nest material into the gourd where young Tree Swallows were days from fledging. The adult Tree Swallows went missing and the HOSPS had started burying the young birds with grass and what not. I approached the gourd and removed the HOSP nesting with the young Swallows still alive but cowering in a little pocket at the far rear. As of now I still see no adult Swallows around while the Male HOSP has returned and is trying to attract a female to the gourd again. The young Swallows are probably dead at this point but I’ll check again later today. This is the heartbreaking part of birding for me. My only request to others is to never erect housing or give housing to anyone who can’t or won’t agree to active management when non-native species are anywhere around. So sad.
>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>>
>>>
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>>
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>
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