Date: 6/28/20 7:58 am
From: Tyler Hallman <hallmanator...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Sauvie Parula, Scio BBS
Another note: I made a separate incidental list with the exact location on
our walk back.

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 7:32 AM Tyler Hallman <hallmanator...> wrote:

> Hey Lars,
>
> Yeah. Yesterday morning I heard a Northern Parula song about six times on
> Warrior Point Trail. I heard it on the walk out and thought I was hearing
> things and wrote it off as something else but on the walk back it did the
> full single buzz upwards with one note after. I couldn’t ever get my eyes
> on it, but then I also couldn’t get my eyes on nearly anything else in the
> canopy. I also unfortunately didn’t get a recording as by the time I got my
> phone out it stopped singing and the mosquitos were intense. I sat there
> eaten alive for over 10 more minutes before leaving.
>
> Hopefully someone else heads that way and can find it. By the time we were
> leaving the trail was getting pretty busy and not everyone was wearing
> masks...
>
> Given the actual sightings etc., The other Parula sounds like a much safer
> bet. Weird that that occurred on the same day. I didn’t see that report
> until we were back. In any case, I completely understand if eBird doesn’t
> accept my sighting as I have no good evidence. Wanted to put it out there
> in case someone else nearby can find it.
>
> Cheers,
>
> On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 3:10 AM larspernorgren <larspernorgren...>
> wrote:
>
>> Saturday's eBird synopsis includes multiple detections of NOPA(going and
>> coming) by Tyler Hallman and Whitney Fleming on the Warrior Point Trail at
>> Sauvie Island. This is a much shorter chase for many of us than the bird at
>> Coos North Spit. I don't know if " vagrant" is the proper descriptor of
>> Northern Parulas in coastal Baja Oregon anymore. There was a singing NOPA
>> on the Coos N Spit in summer another year not long ago, and multiple such
>> records in Del Norte County. Despite spending two thirds of my life in the
>> Portland area l have never walked the Warrior Point Trail. It starts at the
>> end of Reeder Road(the east/ Columbia coast of Sauvie) . Warrior Point is
>> the northern tip of the island, the northern end of the Multnomah Channel
>> and hence the bitter end of the Willamette River.
>> The Breeding Bird Survey (BBS)is a US Fish and Wildlife Service
>> program. At one point it was the only comprehensive effort by USF&WS to
>> monitor songbird populations. One route exists for each rectangle defined
>> by a degree of latitude and longitude. A three minute point count is made
>> every half mile for 25 miles. I did the Scio route described by Joel in
>> 1981. At the Union Hill Cemetary l detected Western Kingbird. I have
>> detected the species within 5-10 miles of there in June/July repeatedly
>> over the decades. 1977 was the first time. My visits to Marion County are
>> few so the species must be fairly regular there in summer. On the 1981
>> survey l saw a Townsend's Warbler singing on top of an oak where the
>> highway goes under the powerline a few stops south of Mehama. The next stop
>> , on the grade descending to Mehama , yielded a Red-eyed Vireo. The western
>> foothills of the Cascades receive very little attention from birders. My
>> own very limited efforts have always been highly rewarding.
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
> --
> Tyler Hallman, Ph.D.
> Postdoctoral Scholar
> Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
> Oregon State University Corvallis
>
> "You miss one hundred percent of the shots you never take."
> -Wayne Gretzky
>
> "We're becoming paleontologists describing things that are already
> extinct."
> -Luis Coloma regarding herpetologists
>
--
Tyler Hallman, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Scholar
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Oregon State University Corvallis

"You miss one hundred percent of the shots you never take."
-Wayne Gretzky

"We're becoming paleontologists describing things that are already extinct."
-Luis Coloma regarding herpetologists

 
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