Date: 5/23/20 11:25 am
From: Steven Lamonde <slamonde...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
Hi Dave,

While eBird does not have profile pages for the winged-warbler hybrids, you
can explore maps of hybrid sightings via eBird:

Golden-winged Warbler x Blue-winged Warbler (hybrid)
<https://ebird.org/map/x00669?neg=true&env.minX=-173.92238248913338&env.minY=-20.913408122522927&env.maxX=51.0776175108666&env.maxY=64.64590782287743&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>
Brewster's Warbler (hybrid)
<https://ebird.org/map/brewar?neg=true&env.minX=-173.92238248913338&env.minY=-20.913408122522927&env.maxX=51.0776175108666&env.maxY=64.64590782287743&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>
Lawrence's Warbler (hybrid)
<https://ebird.org/map/lawwar?neg=true&env.minX=-79.48272199999998&env.minY=41.426977826938874&env.maxX=-65.42022199999998&env.maxY=46.24132036285134&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>

Enjoy!

Steven
<https://ebird.org/map/x00669?neg=true&env.minX=-173.92238248913338&env.minY=-20.913408122522927&env.maxX=51.0776175108666&env.maxY=64.64590782287743&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>

On Sat, May 23, 2020 at 2:01 PM David Guertin <dave...> wrote:

> Ian,
>
> I really appreciate your efforts in clarifying the winged-warblers. I
> had been guilty of thinking of hybrids solely in terms of the
> Brewster's/Lawrence's hybrids named in the field guides, but have come
> to learn that it's way more interesting than that! Thank you for the
> education. These birds are fascinating. There's a male that has
> settled in near my house which I had previously identified as a
> Golden-winged, because that's what it looks like -- mostly. But a
> conspicuous wash of yellow on his breast indicates that he is indeed a
> hybrid.
>
> And there's nothing wrong with that!
>
> I want to find out more about hybrids that are being seen around here,
> and what different types of hybrids, because they are so interesting,
> but unfortunately eBird only seems to allow searching for "pure"
> species. I can search for Blue-wings, or Golden-wings, but not
> hybrids. To me, that's too bad, because they're as interesting in
> their own right as the pure species, other than the fact that they
> don't "count" for a checklist.
>
> I'll still enjoy the mostly-but-not-pure-Golden-winged Warbler at home
> as long as he chooses to stick around!
>
> Oh, and one other thing: our local not-quite-Golden-winged Warbler has
> been singing no less than three different variations of his song, one
> of which is a simple bee-bzzz that sounds just like a Blue-winged
> Warbler. So yeah, as you point out, song is not such a reliable
> characteristic of these birds.
>
> Dave G.
>
> Quoting Ian Worley <iworley...>:
>
> > Hi everyone,
> >
> > Lots of reports of winged-warblers in eBird from the Champlain
> > Valley the last two weeks. Below is the information email I sent
> > out a week ago, in case you didn't see it.
> >
> > There are many good documentations coming in. To date about 85% of
> > photos submitted as Blue-winged Warblers appear to be correct IDs.
> > About 40% of photos submitted as Golden-winged Warblers are hybrids
> > and not a pure Golden-winged. About 70% of submissions with no
> > photos are doing nice jobs of enumerating numerous diagnostic
> > features that serve to identify pure Blue-wingeds and
> > Golden-wingeds, and hybrids. The remainder of the submissions don't
> > describe enough characteristics to fulfill the ID.
> >
> > When submitting more than one bird for a species or hybrid category,
> > be sure to describe each individual bird.
> >
> > It is nice to see so many descriptions of the vocalizations. Taken
> > as a whole they clearly illustrate that any pure species or hybrid
> > might sing any of the songs. Which means, of course, at least in
> > the Champlain Valley population the song is not a diagnostic feature
> > separating species.
> >
> > When looking at possible pure Golden-wingeds, don't forget to note
> > if there is any yellow wash on the breast or belly, which would
> > indicate a hybrid. Likewise, carefully look at and document the
> > color of wing bars on any bird you see well enough to do so. If the
> > wing-panel on a possible Golden-winged is not essentially solid, a
> > good description is helpful.
> >
> > Gorgeous weather this holidaty weekend continues for tracking down
> > these gorgeous species! It seems that some new locations are being
> > found.
> >
> > Best wishes,
> >
> > Ian
> > ========================
> > May 17, 2020
> >
> > Hello birders in search of the "winged-warblers" in Vermont.
> >
> > These fascinating birds are back, perhaps where you have seen them
> > before, or in newly evolving habitats as abandoned fields begin to
> > fill with shrubs and trees. Or maybe a familiar site has changed
> > enough that it is no longer suitable.
> >
> > This would be a good time to revisit, or visit for the first time,
> > some documents which will tell you about the winged-warbler complex,
> > what to look for when viewing the birds and identifying each
> > individual, and how to submit to eBird.
> >
> > ----- For a Vermont background on the wing-warbler complex in the
> > state, read about the "Golden-winged Warbler Conservation" project
> > underway by Vermont Audubon:
> > https://vt.audubon.org/conservation/golden-winged-warbler-conservation
> >
> > ----- In that website is this link to a detailed article about the
> > two species and their hybrids. Two important aspect of these birds
> > are (a) vocalizations heard can not be used to determine whether the
> > bird singing is one or the other of the species or a hybrid, and (b)
> > IDs are dependent upon combinations of many plumage
> > characteristics. Here is the link:
> >
> >
> https://vt.audubon.org/sites/default/files/static_pages/attachments/winged-warblers._how_to_tell_a_pure_species_from_a_hybrid._7-10-19e.pdf
> >
> > *******----- The last page (page 7) of that article is a table to
> > keep handy as you bird. It has eleven diagnostic features to look
> > for, features that will help you decide if the bird you are viewing
> > is one of the two species, a named hybrid, a hybrid of some mix of
> > characteristics, or not possible to figure our from what you saw or
> > heard.
> >
> > ----- For figuring out how to submit your observation to eBird, use
> > this guide from the Vermont eBird website:
> >
> https://ebird.org/vt/news/golden-blue-winged-warbler-potpourri-how-to-submit-to-ebird
> >
> > As always, if you are able to photograph a bird or birds, multiple
> > views are much more helpful than a single photo. eBird allows up to
> > ten photos per species.
> >
> > Happy warblering!
> >
> > Ian
> > Vermont eBird reviewer for the Champlain Valley
>


--
Steven Lamonde
Conservation Biology (MS) candidate
Adjunct Faculty - Department of Environmental Studies
Manager - Antioch Spatial Analysis Lab
Antioch University New England
Keene, New Hampshire
<slamonde...>
(339) 236-1421
 
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