Date: 5/11/20 11:04 am
From: Anthony Hill <anhinga13...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 9 May 2020 to 10 May 2020 (#2020-123)
Get ready - on Mother's Day i had a male American Goldfinch attacking windows here in Flatland!

Anthony Hill
S. Hadley, MA
.

sent via my Android tablet; please excuse brevity and typos.

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
Sent: Monday, May 11, 2020 12:00:02 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 9 May 2020 to 10 May 2020 (#2020-123)

There are 13 messages totaling 611 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. FOY Catbird in Montpelier
2. Magical Windows
3. May 10, 2020: Thetford Center
4. Bobolinks
5. Moose Bog (6)
6. Yellow rumps Derby
7. Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
8. Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 07:55:22 -0400
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr...>
Subject: FOY Catbird in Montpelier

Acting more like a robin, scratching and flipping leaves under a forsythia bush in full and snowy bloom, a catbird returns!

This snow WILL melt, right?! Thanks to mothers everywhere avian and other.


Still learning to see,

John

http://www.johnsnell.photography <http://www.eyeimagein.com/>
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com <http://www.stilllearningtosee.com/>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 08:29:48 -0400
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Subject: Magical Windows

For the last month we have had, first a pair of Cardinals and most recently just the male, attacking all the windows and glass doors of our house. Just now I looked up to see a male Rose breasted Grosbeak attacking our dining room window. I guess it isn’t just the humans that are a bubble off plumb these days.

Mundi
North Pownal

Sent from my iPad

The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 08:30:19 -0400
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: May 10, 2020: Thetford Center

5:14 a.m. 34 degrees. Wind irrelevant. Three-quarter moon high above Coyote
Hollow, midway between eastern and western horizons. Faint, fainter,
faintest dusting of snow, mostly on moldering leaves along the edge of the
road. No ice. Eight geese pass over the house, northeast to southwest,
trailing their voices behind them. Last night, sometime after midnight, an
owl called from the edge of the wetland. Then, I heard commercial jetliner
in the north, very likely a Pond crossing. I listened until the sound of
jet engines eventually faded away like piece of music. Unable to fall back
to sleep, I considered the plane, only the second I'd noticed since the
coming of COVID. Where was it headed? Who rides the Red-eye? Then, I
realized that these past two months must have been heaven for landscape
photographers working a sky void of contrails . . . clouds and clouds
only.

The walk: business as usual. Road and gullies birdless. I toggle from one
bird to another. Thrushes and vireos have found their voice; the valley
richer for it. Four ovenbirds holler; tough birds; tough genes. Chickadees
hold a meeting in a hemlock. The background vocals (so *close *to stardom):
robin, nuthatches, sparrows, titmouse, junco, phoebe, black and white
warbler, *myrtle* warbler (only one this mornning), magnolia warbler (FOY),
mourning dove, blue jay. And, of course, bittern; whose clipped call issues
from a secret corner of the wetland.

My youngest son, Jordan, who graduated from Kenyon last year, works in the
cardiology department at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and has hooked
a number of COVID patients to various heart monitors. Quarantining in my
house with Jordan is like playing Russian roulette. Thus, making each walk
in Coyote Hollow special, a second-coming of my childhood, when hours
passed for minutes—no worries, no plans, few intervening thoughts. The
coronavirus, at least at sunrise, has momentarily immersed me into my
homeground and into timelessness: such a gift, every iteration of birdsong
a thrill . . . homeboy at home.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 09:31:32 -0400
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: Bobolinks

Bobolinks are back in Brandon. Males were displaying and their welcomed tinkling song brightened this chilly morn.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 13:03:58 -0400
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Moose Bog

I spent 2 hours at Moose Bog this morning, probably the least amount of time
I've ever spent there. Light snow falling, 32 degrees & 4" on ground still
left from the 6"-7" from yesterday with winds of 10-15 mph. Few birds were
vocalizing or moving around but it was surprising to hear a Blue-headed
Vireo singing. The Hermit Thrush were frantically foraging in the few places
where snow was minimal. Yellow-rumped Warblers and a lone Palm Warbler
foraged on top of the moss covered snow. For what I'm not sure.

Thanks to Dave Govatski as we clear and cut any fallen trees from the trail
year round. This winter after a heavy wet snow-fall we spent hours shaking
the trunks of all the Black Spruce we saw bent into 180 degree arcs before
they snapped. There were almost no Spruce Grouse in this area of Wenlock WMA
this past winter. I along with Dave checked for tracks at least 3 times a
week and perhaps only 2 or 3 times found any tracks at all. And weren't sure
which grouse species those tracks belonged to. The trail, to me, has gotten
nosier over the years from what seems like heavier traffic use on route 105.
Also many older trees have been knocked down by winds etc. and this has
opened up some of the natural 'noise block' between the road and trail.

The gravel path from the parking lot to viewing platform has increased the
use of this special place as a place to 'take the dog for a walk', many
unleashed. And of course the deposits dogs leave behind. In winter
Chickadees & Red-breasted Nuthatch now 'pester' visitors for peanuts but as
the spring approaches they have more important things to tend to and so far
it does not appear much harm is done by this 'bird feeding' (although a
biologist may have more reliable information on the cons of this). It also
seems there is an abundance of Red Squirrels, at least this past year and
that may have to do with the cone crop supply but probably not a good idea
to leave 'treats' behind thinking the Canada Jays will like them because the
squirrels are usually the ones who get them. Today it seemed weird to find a
Spruce Grouse in the snow but after all this is the Kingdom.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S68797074



Tom Berriman



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 13:49:36 -0400
From: Elinor Osborn <elinor91...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

The lack of spruce grouse is very disturbing. Tom, is there anything we can do to help?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

I spent 2 hours at Moose Bog this morning, probably the least amount of time
I've ever spent there. Light snow falling, 32 degrees & 4" on ground still
left from the 6"-7" from yesterday with winds of 10-15 mph. Few birds were
vocalizing or moving around but it was surprising to hear a Blue-headed
Vireo singing. The Hermit Thrush were frantically foraging in the few places
where snow was minimal. Yellow-rumped Warblers and a lone Palm Warbler
foraged on top of the moss covered snow. For what I'm not sure.

Thanks to Dave Govatski as we clear and cut any fallen trees from the trail
year round. This winter after a heavy wet snow-fall we spent hours shaking
the trunks of all the Black Spruce we saw bent into 180 degree arcs before
they snapped. There were almost no Spruce Grouse in this area of Wenlock WMA
this past winter. I along with Dave checked for tracks at least 3 times a
week and perhaps only 2 or 3 times found any tracks at all. And weren't sure
which grouse species those tracks belonged to. The trail, to me, has gotten
nosier over the years from what seems like heavier traffic use on route 105.
Also many older trees have been knocked down by winds etc. and this has
opened up some of the natural 'noise block' between the road and trail.

The gravel path from the parking lot to viewing platform has increased the
use of this special place as a place to 'take the dog for a walk', many
unleashed. And of course the deposits dogs leave behind. In winter
Chickadees & Red-breasted Nuthatch now 'pester' visitors for peanuts but as
the spring approaches they have more important things to tend to and so far
it does not appear much harm is done by this 'bird feeding' (although a
biologist may have more reliable information on the cons of this). It also
seems there is an abundance of Red Squirrels, at least this past year and
that may have to do with the cone crop supply but probably not a good idea
to leave 'treats' behind thinking the Canada Jays will like them because the
squirrels are usually the ones who get them. Today it seemed weird to find a
Spruce Grouse in the snow but after all this is the Kingdom.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S68797074



Tom Berriman

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 14:17:44 -0400
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: Yellow rumps Derby

Waves of YRW have coming through...many working the trees for insects but
also searching the gorest floor to find food which has to be scarce with
temps in the low 40s with spotty flurries. One was bathing at the edge of a
stream despite the wintry conditions.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 14:47:34 -0400
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 17:01:28 -0400
From: Elinor Osborn <elinor91...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 17:47:23 -0400
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

The other thing I have noticed a few times I have been there...people "training" their dogs with radio collars and people with dogs to hunt bears. That can't be good for wildlife.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Elinor Osborn" <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 5:01:28 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog

Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 18:08:57 -0400
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: Bluebird cam, Sunday edition

Mrs. moved into the box and spent last night on the eggs. I figured she'd
laid all she was going to. But, she surprised me with a fifth egg this
morning. She's spent most of the day sitting on them. That should start the
clock on incubation. Looks like sometime between May 21 and 23 for the
chicks to hatch.



Flash version:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-10-2020.html



Link to MP4 version



http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com<http://www.IanClark.com> <http://www.IanClark.com>



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 18:21:14 -0400
From: Brenna <dbgaldenzi...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

Hi Alison,
You’re absolutely right. Bear hounders start “training” their dogs on June 1st on bear, which is not only obviously cruel to the bears and vulnerable cubs, but these dogs disrupt nesting ground birds and other wildlife. The dogs’ owners are miles away and have no control over their marauding hounds. Folks can learn more about it here: https://www.protectourwildlifevt.org/hunting-with-hounds

Bear hound “training” lasts all summer long and then bear hound hunting starts Sept 1 through end of Nov.

Brenna Galdenzi

Sent from my iPhone, which has been known to mess with me.

> On May 10, 2020, at 5:47 PM, alison wagner <alikatofvt...> wrote:
>
> The other thing I have noticed a few times I have been there...people "training" their dogs with radio collars and people with dogs to hunt bears. That can't be good for wildlife.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Elinor Osborn" <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
> To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 5:01:28 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
>
> Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
> Elinor
>
> Elinor Osborn Photography
> 1286 Lost Nation Rd
> Craftsbury Common VT 05827
>
> 802 586-9994
> <elinor91...>
>
> http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com
>
> On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:
>
> Hi Elinor
>
> Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
> West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
> I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
> Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
> at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
> less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
> 3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
> mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
> season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
> females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.
>
> It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
> another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
> slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
> replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
> provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
> male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
> rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
> areas.
>
> It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
> trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
> direct cause..yet.
>
> I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
> try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
> have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.
>
> Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 18:41:54 -0400
From: David Guertin <dave...>
Subject: Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain

I'm delurking here to post my first message, prompted by my first-ever
sighting of a Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain, seen from the boat launch
under the Champlain Bridge in Addison. I was scanning a late-departing
raft of just over 20 scaup through the scope, trying to separate Lessers
from Greaters. I was able to positively identify two of each, when the
scope landed on something that wasn't actually a scaup. I first thought,
hey, a Ring-necked Du..., no wait a minute, that characteristic white
stripe is missing. And what's with that weird tuft of feathers hanging
down the back of his neck? Hey! Wait! That's a Tufted Duck! It's been a
while since I've seen a life bird, so that was pretty exciting.

There was also a group of 8 Buffleheads hanging out with these scaup.

Final count:

2 Lesser Scaup
2 Greater Scaup
18 scaup sp.
1 Tufted Duck(!)
8 Bufflehead
450 Double-crested Cormorants (They pretty much blanketed a good piece
of the middle of the lake.)
70 gull sp. (hanging out with the cormorants)
1 Caspian Tern

Dave G.

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 9 May 2020 to 10 May 2020 (#2020-123)
************************************************************
 
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