Date: 1/22/20 6:00 am
From: eBird alert <alert.ebird...>
Subject: [slocobirding] [eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert
*** Species Summary:

- Redhead (3 reports)
- Long-tailed Duck (21 reports)
- Ruddy Turnstone (1 report)
- White-rumped Sandpiper (1 report)
- Lesser Yellowlegs (1 report)
- Glaucous Gull (2 reports)
- Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (11 reports)
- Red-naped Sapsucker (2 reports)
- Tropical Kingbird (1 report)
- Chipping Sparrow (4 reports)
- Green-tailed Towhee (3 reports)

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Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Redhead (Aythya americana) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 10:28 by Rob Tyser
- 3201–3267 Via Anzuelo, Atascadero US-CA (35.5128,-120.6695), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.512832,-120.669532&ll=35.512832,-120.669532
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63641906
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing bird"

Redhead (Aythya americana) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 13:36 by Anne lednicer
- The Lakes (Private - No public Access), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.514975,-120.67369&ll=35.514975,-120.67369
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63650838
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing"

Redhead (Aythya americana) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 13:36 by Kevin Enns-Rempel
- The Lakes (Private - No public Access), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.514975,-120.67369&ll=35.514975,-120.67369
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63642286
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 16:30 by August Hazel
- Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3713528,-120.8594374&ll=35.3713528,-120.8594374
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63646386
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Feeding in harbor. Seen with Herb Elliot."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 20, 2020 10:05 by Diane Highbaugh
- Morro Bay Harbor, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3699,-120.857&ll=35.3699,-120.857
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63624722
- Comments: "continuing bird"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 06:58 by Anne lednicer
- Morro Bay Harbor, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3699,-120.857&ll=35.3699,-120.857
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63651090
- Comments: "Continuing"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 06:58 by Kevin Enns-Rempel
- Morro Bay Harbor, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3699,-120.857&ll=35.3699,-120.857
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63642297
- Comments: "Continuing"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 09:00 by Anonymous eBirder
- Morro Bay Harbor, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3699,-120.857&ll=35.3699,-120.857
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63627904
- Comments: "Identified by docent on birding trip. Female. Later verified my photo via Merlin app."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1)
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 11:12 by Alex Tey
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63650732
- Comments: "continuing male by the floating dock off Coleman Park. pink on bill, diffused cheek patch, gray feathers in scapulars, otherwise dark above and white below."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 11:12 by Rebecca Kirby
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63647869
- Comments: "continuing male by the floating dock off Coleman Park. pink on bill, diffused cheek patch, gray feathers in scapulars, otherwise dark above and white below."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 11:12 by Frederic Leist
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63647848
- Comments: "continuing male by the floating dock off Coleman Park. pink on bill, diffused cheek patch, gray feathers in scapulars, otherwise dark above and white below."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 11:12 by Anna Zagorski
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63647462
- Comments: "continuing male by the floating dock off Coleman Park. pink on bill, diffused cheek patch, gray feathers in scapulars, otherwise dark above and white below."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 11:12 by Ann Hep
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63647256
- Comments: "continuing male by the floating dock off Coleman Park. pink on bill, diffused cheek patch, gray feathers in scapulars, otherwise dark above and white below."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 11:12 by Tom Edell
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63564697
- Comments: "continuing male by the floating dock off Coleman Park. pink on bill, diffused cheek patch, gray feathers in scapulars, otherwise dark above and white below."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (2)
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Paul Kinzer
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63650604
- Comments: "(we saw both continuing birds, with the female seen off sandy beach just south of the short revetment across channel from Morro Rock, and the male near floating dock off Coleman Park)"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Will Knowlton
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63646315
- Comments: "(we saw both continuing birds, with the female seen off sandy beach just south of the short revetment across channel from Morro Rock, and the male near floating dock off Coleman Park)"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Rob Tyser
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63648478
- Comments: "(we saw both continuing birds, with the female seen off sandy beach just south of the short revetment across channel from Morro Rock, and the male near floating dock off Coleman Park)"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Scott Restivo
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63627141
- Comments: "(we saw both continuing birds, with the female seen off sandy beach just south of the short revetment across channel from Morro Rock, and the male near floating dock off Coleman Park)"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Anonymous eBirder
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63626113
- Comments: "(we saw both continuing birds, with the female seen off sandy beach just south of the short revetment across channel from Morro Rock, and the male near floating dock off Coleman Park)"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1)
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 07:19 by Paul Kinzer
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63650619
- Comments: "continuing female off beach between the short inner jetty and the south jetty."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 07:19 by August Hazel
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63646127
- Comments: "continuing female off beach between the short inner jetty and the south jetty."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 07:19 by Scott Restivo
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63627148
- Comments: "continuing female off beach between the short inner jetty and the south jetty."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 07:19 by Anonymous eBirder
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63626098
- Comments: "continuing female off beach between the short inner jetty and the south jetty."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 17, 2020 07:18 by Rob Tyser
- Morro Rock, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3693972,-120.8670566&ll=35.3693972,-120.8670566
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63648727
- Comments: "Continuing"

Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 08:00 by Sally Sanderson
- Estero Bluffs SP, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4484114,-120.9437799&ll=35.4484114,-120.9437799
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63626506
- Comments: "Scope view of two birds roosting on near shore rock."

White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis) (2)
- Reported Jan 17, 2020 09:48 by Mike Bryan
- Santa Rosa Creek-below Windsor, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.5677012,-121.1064448&ll=35.5677012,-121.1064448
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63640495
- Comments: "Foraging along bank of stream near sea shore with other shorebirds. Larger than accompanying LESAs with yellow legs, long, faiy slim bodies/long wings and black slightly downcurved bills. White rumps observed when preening."

Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) (1)
- Reported Jan 17, 2020 13:15 by Rob Tyser
- Main St- Park View Dr to Morro Bay SP Marina, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.353867,-120.829603&ll=35.353867,-120.829603
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63648632
- Comments: "Smaller than GRYE, short bill, skinny legs, much more petit than GRYE seen later that day, ID per Wes Fritz"

Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 20, 2020 10:15 by Tim Ludwick
- Pt. Piedras Blancas--elephant seal colony, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.6627706,-121.2567043&ll=35.6627706,-121.2567043
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63643750
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Large, nearly white gull. Pink bill with blackish tip."

Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 20, 2020 10:15 by Rebecca Kirby
- Pt. Piedras Blancas--elephant seal colony, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.6627706,-121.2567043&ll=35.6627706,-121.2567043
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63643755
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Large, nearly white gull. Pink bill with blackish tip."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 20, 2020 10:05 by Diane Highbaugh
- Morro Bay Harbor, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3699,-120.857&ll=35.3699,-120.857
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63624722
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "This bird was sitting where we boarded Cap't Stew's boat"

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (2)
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 16:00 by Tiffany Miller
- Morro Bay SP--Marina/Boardwalk Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3445235,-120.8418006&ll=35.3445235,-120.8418006
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63644222
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Two juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron's hanging out in the marina. Appeared to be different ages."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 08:45 by Anne lednicer
- Morro Bay SP--Marina/Boardwalk Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3445235,-120.8418006&ll=35.3445235,-120.8418006
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63650878
- Comments: "Continuing"

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 08:45 by Kevin Enns-Rempel
- Morro Bay SP--Marina/Boardwalk Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3445235,-120.8418006&ll=35.3445235,-120.8418006
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63642295
- Comments: "Continuing"

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 17, 2020 13:19 by Rob Tyser
- Morro Bay SP--Marina/Boardwalk Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3445235,-120.8418006&ll=35.3445235,-120.8418006
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63648622
- Comments: "Continuing juvenile in boats"

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (3)
- Reported Jan 17, 2020 12:10 by Meg Andrews
- Morro Bay SP--Marina/Boardwalk Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3445235,-120.8418006&ll=35.3445235,-120.8418006
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63633834
- Comments: "Continuing birds, roosting on 2 different docked boats. Thinner and darker than BCNH, all-dark bills."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Paul Kinzer
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63650604
- Comments: "While going through the lists for the day, Fritz spotted this bird standing on the dock below the landing at which we had just arrived and mere meters from where we departed the boat a few minutes earlier. I then walked down onto the dock and took several photos before this bird flew to one of the braces for the building above, where it remained for us to take some more photos. I never heard this bird vocalize and it was rather sedate while under observation apart from it sone short flight. Not only was this bird a year older than the other three Yellow-crowned Night-Herons that were at the state park, but after seeing this bird we drove over to the state park marina and saw all three first-winter birds that have been there.
This was a stocky, medium-sized heron with a rather massive bill, a blocky head, a medium-length neck that was more massive than those of most herons yet slimmer than that of a Black-crowned Night-Heron, short and seemingly rounded wings, a short tail, and medium-length legs that had more mass than those of an egret. I thought the bill was quite deep and that it was about as long as the head was wide, with a culmen that curved subtly yet smoothly downward to the pointed tip of the bill. The forehead was steep but short and the crown was gently rounded back to the more strongly rounded junction of the crown with the nape. When extended, this bird’s neck was both long and slim for a night-heron even though it was both shorter and stouter than that of a egret. The body was plump, full-chested, and with a posture that was more upright than diagonal when the bird was alert. I noted minimal primary projection on short, rounded wings that appeared to fall right at the tip of the short tail, which was obscured by the closed wings.
This bird’s plumage patterns were clearly those of a subadult bird in that they combined a faint suggestion of the pattern of an adult on the head with the generally grayish or brownish body and wings of a young bird. The head was generally a slate-gray in color, but with the forehead and crown brownish centrally yet with a paler and somewhat yellowish frame that extended through the supraloral region and along either side of the crown. I also noted at least some suggestion of a pale gray stripe extending narrowly below the eye before expanding on the auriculars in a faint suggestion of the adult cheek-stripe. The chin and maybe also the upper throat were pale yellow and thus contrasting conspicuously with the more blackish face. I did not see the neck all that well, but it did not appear to contrast obviously with the body. The back and scapulars was a medium to dark gray and each of the larger scapular feathers at least had a relatively broad band of slate gray running down the center that was bordered on either side by lighter gray to create a striped appearance to the generally dark and grayish upperparts. The wings contrasted as lighter and slightly browner than the back, and at least most of the covert feathers had a small, pale spot where the shaft met the tip. The larger greater coverts, and maybe also some of the lesser coverts also had a paler stripe along the leading edge that gave the lower part of the closed wing a striped appearance that was even more conspicuously given the narrow but well-defined fringes on the tertials. I did not see the underparts as well as I did the upperparts and wings, but what I did see appeared to be quite dusky and seemingly not as conspicuously striped as were the first-winter birds seen shortly later.
The bill was a dull, blackish in color, and the irides were orangey and contrasting sharply with the black pupils. The legs appeared to be blackish when seen from the front, but greenish or yellowish-green when seen from behind; however, I cannot now remember the color of the toes."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Rob Tyser
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63648478
- Comments: "While going through the lists for the day, Fritz spotted this bird standing on the dock below the landing at which we had just arrived and mere meters from where we departed the boat a few minutes earlier. I then walked down onto the dock and took several photos before this bird flew to one of the braces for the building above, where it remained for us to take some more photos. I never heard this bird vocalize and it was rather sedate while under observation apart from it sone short flight. Not only was this bird a year older than the other three Yellow-crowned Night-Herons that were at the state park, but after seeing this bird we drove over to the state park marina and saw all three first-winter birds that have been there.
This was a stocky, medium-sized heron with a rather massive bill, a blocky head, a medium-length neck that was more massive than those of most herons yet slimmer than that of a Black-crowned Night-Heron, short and seemingly rounded wings, a short tail, and medium-length legs that had more mass than those of an egret. I thought the bill was quite deep and that it was about as long as the head was wide, with a culmen that curved subtly yet smoothly downward to the pointed tip of the bill. The forehead was steep but short and the crown was gently rounded back to the more strongly rounded junction of the crown with the nape. When extended, this bird’s neck was both long and slim for a night-heron even though it was both shorter and stouter than that of a egret. The body was plump, full-chested, and with a posture that was more upright than diagonal when the bird was alert. I noted minimal primary projection on short, rounded wings that appeared to fall right at the tip of the short tail, which was obscured by the closed wings.
This bird’s plumage patterns were clearly those of a subadult bird in that they combined a faint suggestion of the pattern of an adult on the head with the generally grayish or brownish body and wings of a young bird. The head was generally a slate-gray in color, but with the forehead and crown brownish centrally yet with a paler and somewhat yellowish frame that extended through the supraloral region and along either side of the crown. I also noted at least some suggestion of a pale gray stripe extending narrowly below the eye before expanding on the auriculars in a faint suggestion of the adult cheek-stripe. The chin and maybe also the upper throat were pale yellow and thus contrasting conspicuously with the more blackish face. I did not see the neck all that well, but it did not appear to contrast obviously with the body. The back and scapulars was a medium to dark gray and each of the larger scapular feathers at least had a relatively broad band of slate gray running down the center that was bordered on either side by lighter gray to create a striped appearance to the generally dark and grayish upperparts. The wings contrasted as lighter and slightly browner than the back, and at least most of the covert feathers had a small, pale spot where the shaft met the tip. The larger greater coverts, and maybe also some of the lesser coverts also had a paler stripe along the leading edge that gave the lower part of the closed wing a striped appearance that was even more conspicuously given the narrow but well-defined fringes on the tertials. I did not see the underparts as well as I did the upperparts and wings, but what I did see appeared to be quite dusky and seemingly not as conspicuously striped as were the first-winter birds seen shortly later.
The bill was a dull, blackish in color, and the irides were orangey and contrasting sharply with the black pupils. The legs appeared to be blackish when seen from the front, but greenish or yellowish-green when seen from behind; however, I cannot now remember the color of the toes."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Will Knowlton
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63646315
- Comments: "While going through the lists for the day, Fritz spotted this bird standing on the dock below the landing at which we had just arrived and mere meters from where we departed the boat a few minutes earlier. I then walked down onto the dock and took several photos before this bird flew to one of the braces for the building above, where it remained for us to take some more photos. I never heard this bird vocalize and it was rather sedate while under observation apart from it sone short flight. Not only was this bird a year older than the other three Yellow-crowned Night-Herons that were at the state park, but after seeing this bird we drove over to the state park marina and saw all three first-winter birds that have been there.
This was a stocky, medium-sized heron with a rather massive bill, a blocky head, a medium-length neck that was more massive than those of most herons yet slimmer than that of a Black-crowned Night-Heron, short and seemingly rounded wings, a short tail, and medium-length legs that had more mass than those of an egret. I thought the bill was quite deep and that it was about as long as the head was wide, with a culmen that curved subtly yet smoothly downward to the pointed tip of the bill. The forehead was steep but short and the crown was gently rounded back to the more strongly rounded junction of the crown with the nape. When extended, this bird’s neck was both long and slim for a night-heron even though it was both shorter and stouter than that of a egret. The body was plump, full-chested, and with a posture that was more upright than diagonal when the bird was alert. I noted minimal primary projection on short, rounded wings that appeared to fall right at the tip of the short tail, which was obscured by the closed wings.
This bird’s plumage patterns were clearly those of a subadult bird in that they combined a faint suggestion of the pattern of an adult on the head with the generally grayish or brownish body and wings of a young bird. The head was generally a slate-gray in color, but with the forehead and crown brownish centrally yet with a paler and somewhat yellowish frame that extended through the supraloral region and along either side of the crown. I also noted at least some suggestion of a pale gray stripe extending narrowly below the eye before expanding on the auriculars in a faint suggestion of the adult cheek-stripe. The chin and maybe also the upper throat were pale yellow and thus contrasting conspicuously with the more blackish face. I did not see the neck all that well, but it did not appear to contrast obviously with the body. The back and scapulars was a medium to dark gray and each of the larger scapular feathers at least had a relatively broad band of slate gray running down the center that was bordered on either side by lighter gray to create a striped appearance to the generally dark and grayish upperparts. The wings contrasted as lighter and slightly browner than the back, and at least most of the covert feathers had a small, pale spot where the shaft met the tip. The larger greater coverts, and maybe also some of the lesser coverts also had a paler stripe along the leading edge that gave the lower part of the closed wing a striped appearance that was even more conspicuously given the narrow but well-defined fringes on the tertials. I did not see the underparts as well as I did the upperparts and wings, but what I did see appeared to be quite dusky and seemingly not as conspicuously striped as were the first-winter birds seen shortly later.
The bill was a dull, blackish in color, and the irides were orangey and contrasting sharply with the black pupils. The legs appeared to be blackish when seen from the front, but greenish or yellowish-green when seen from behind; however, I cannot now remember the color of the toes."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Scott Restivo
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63627141
- Comments: "While going through the lists for the day, Fritz spotted this bird standing on the dock below the landing at which we had just arrived and mere meters from where we departed the boat a few minutes earlier. I then walked down onto the dock and took several photos before this bird flew to one of the braces for the building above, where it remained for us to take some more photos. I never heard this bird vocalize and it was rather sedate while under observation apart from it sone short flight. Not only was this bird a year older than the other three Yellow-crowned Night-Herons that were at the state park, but after seeing this bird we drove over to the state park marina and saw all three first-winter birds that have been there.
This was a stocky, medium-sized heron with a rather massive bill, a blocky head, a medium-length neck that was more massive than those of most herons yet slimmer than that of a Black-crowned Night-Heron, short and seemingly rounded wings, a short tail, and medium-length legs that had more mass than those of an egret. I thought the bill was quite deep and that it was about as long as the head was wide, with a culmen that curved subtly yet smoothly downward to the pointed tip of the bill. The forehead was steep but short and the crown was gently rounded back to the more strongly rounded junction of the crown with the nape. When extended, this bird’s neck was both long and slim for a night-heron even though it was both shorter and stouter than that of a egret. The body was plump, full-chested, and with a posture that was more upright than diagonal when the bird was alert. I noted minimal primary projection on short, rounded wings that appeared to fall right at the tip of the short tail, which was obscured by the closed wings.
This bird’s plumage patterns were clearly those of a subadult bird in that they combined a faint suggestion of the pattern of an adult on the head with the generally grayish or brownish body and wings of a young bird. The head was generally a slate-gray in color, but with the forehead and crown brownish centrally yet with a paler and somewhat yellowish frame that extended through the supraloral region and along either side of the crown. I also noted at least some suggestion of a pale gray stripe extending narrowly below the eye before expanding on the auriculars in a faint suggestion of the adult cheek-stripe. The chin and maybe also the upper throat were pale yellow and thus contrasting conspicuously with the more blackish face. I did not see the neck all that well, but it did not appear to contrast obviously with the body. The back and scapulars was a medium to dark gray and each of the larger scapular feathers at least had a relatively broad band of slate gray running down the center that was bordered on either side by lighter gray to create a striped appearance to the generally dark and grayish upperparts. The wings contrasted as lighter and slightly browner than the back, and at least most of the covert feathers had a small, pale spot where the shaft met the tip. The larger greater coverts, and maybe also some of the lesser coverts also had a paler stripe along the leading edge that gave the lower part of the closed wing a striped appearance that was even more conspicuously given the narrow but well-defined fringes on the tertials. I did not see the underparts as well as I did the upperparts and wings, but what I did see appeared to be quite dusky and seemingly not as conspicuously striped as were the first-winter birds seen shortly later.
The bill was a dull, blackish in color, and the irides were orangey and contrasting sharply with the black pupils. The legs appeared to be blackish when seen from the front, but greenish or yellowish-green when seen from behind; however, I cannot now remember the color of the toes."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jan 18, 2020 15:10 by Anonymous eBirder
- Morro Bay harbor mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3640786,-120.8658353&ll=35.3640786,-120.8658353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63626113
- Comments: "While going through the lists for the day, Fritz spotted this bird standing on the dock below the landing at which we had just arrived and mere meters from where we departed the boat a few minutes earlier. I then walked down onto the dock and took several photos before this bird flew to one of the braces for the building above, where it remained for us to take some more photos. I never heard this bird vocalize and it was rather sedate while under observation apart from it sone short flight. Not only was this bird a year older than the other three Yellow-crowned Night-Herons that were at the state park, but after seeing this bird we drove over to the state park marina and saw all three first-winter birds that have been there.
This was a stocky, medium-sized heron with a rather massive bill, a blocky head, a medium-length neck that was more massive than those of most herons yet slimmer than that of a Black-crowned Night-Heron, short and seemingly rounded wings, a short tail, and medium-length legs that had more mass than those of an egret. I thought the bill was quite deep and that it was about as long as the head was wide, with a culmen that curved subtly yet smoothly downward to the pointed tip of the bill. The forehead was steep but short and the crown was gently rounded back to the more strongly rounded junction of the crown with the nape. When extended, this bird’s neck was both long and slim for a night-heron even though it was both shorter and stouter than that of a egret. The body was plump, full-chested, and with a posture that was more upright than diagonal when the bird was alert. I noted minimal primary projection on short, rounded wings that appeared to fall right at the tip of the short tail, which was obscured by the closed wings.
This bird’s plumage patterns were clearly those of a subadult bird in that they combined a faint suggestion of the pattern of an adult on the head with the generally grayish or brownish body and wings of a young bird. The head was generally a slate-gray in color, but with the forehead and crown brownish centrally yet with a paler and somewhat yellowish frame that extended through the supraloral region and along either side of the crown. I also noted at least some suggestion of a pale gray stripe extending narrowly below the eye before expanding on the auriculars in a faint suggestion of the adult cheek-stripe. The chin and maybe also the upper throat were pale yellow and thus contrasting conspicuously with the more blackish face. I did not see the neck all that well, but it did not appear to contrast obviously with the body. The back and scapulars was a medium to dark gray and each of the larger scapular feathers at least had a relatively broad band of slate gray running down the center that was bordered on either side by lighter gray to create a striped appearance to the generally dark and grayish upperparts. The wings contrasted as lighter and slightly browner than the back, and at least most of the covert feathers had a small, pale spot where the shaft met the tip. The larger greater coverts, and maybe also some of the lesser coverts also had a paler stripe along the leading edge that gave the lower part of the closed wing a striped appearance that was even more conspicuously given the narrow but well-defined fringes on the tertials. I did not see the underparts as well as I did the upperparts and wings, but what I did see appeared to be quite dusky and seemingly not as conspicuously striped as were the first-winter birds seen shortly later.
The bill was a dull, blackish in color, and the irides were orangey and contrasting sharply with the black pupils. The legs appeared to be blackish when seen from the front, but greenish or yellowish-green when seen from behind; however, I cannot now remember the color of the toes."

Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 10:52 by Jeff Miller
- Bob Jones Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1886907,-120.7193907&ll=35.1886907,-120.7193907
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63634698
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing; photos"

Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 10:52 by Norman Pillsbury
- Bob Jones Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1886907,-120.7193907&ll=35.1886907,-120.7193907
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63635312
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing; photos"

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 12:40 by Tom Edell
- Laguna Lake Park, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2656069,-120.6903817&ll=35.2656069,-120.6903817
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63649278
- Comments: "Perched in favorite bare trees across water and NW of the boat ramp. Brief views of this bird through tree allowed me to see the large black bill, bright yellow breast, and a green back before it disappeared from view. Curtis returned later and had open views of this bird perched in the same trees. Seventh winter for this bird at this location."

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) (7) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 13:17 by Anne lednicer
- Atascadero Lake, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4646547,-120.6667256&ll=35.4646547,-120.6667256
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63650862
- Comments: "Continuing"

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) (7) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 19, 2020 13:17 by Kevin Enns-Rempel
- Atascadero Lake, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4646547,-120.6667256&ll=35.4646547,-120.6667256
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63642288
- Comments: "Continuing"

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 12:42 by Nick Belardes
- Meadow Park, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2675798,-120.6606531&ll=35.2675798,-120.6606531
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63642648
- Comments: "Continuing near baseball field."

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 10:20 by Tom Edell
- Meadow Park, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2675798,-120.6606531&ll=35.2675798,-120.6606531
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63649840
- Comments: "Very uncooperative sparrow first seen perched in a pine by the ball field and then the back stop. Poor views did show a smallish sparrow with grayish underparts, a small bill and a dark line through the eye to the bill. Two were seen later by the original finder. Species was first reported here on 6 Nov 2019 by Nick Belardes."

Green-tailed Towhee (Pipilo chlorurus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 07:16 by Jeff Miller
- Stagecoach Rd, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.141151,-120.559235&ll=35.141151,-120.559235
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63626730
- Comments: "Continuing"

Green-tailed Towhee (Pipilo chlorurus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 07:16 by Norman Pillsbury
- Stagecoach Rd, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.141151,-120.559235&ll=35.141151,-120.559235
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63629757
- Comments: "Continuing"

Green-tailed Towhee (Pipilo chlorurus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 21, 2020 07:16 by Jeri Edwards
- Stagecoach Rd, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.141151,-120.559235&ll=35.141151,-120.559235
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S63634279
- Comments: "Continuing"

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