Date: 1/14/20 7:53 am
From: Franklin Diaz <franklindiaz602...>
Subject: Re: [GABO-L] Bird translation question
Both, the Black Redstart (Phoenicurus ochruros, colirrojo tizón in Spanish) and the Common Blackbird (Turdus merula, mirlo or zorzal común in Spanish), are listed as “abundant or common” in Lynx/SEO BirdLife’s Aves de España, and the Comunidad de Madrid’s (El Valle de los Caídos) eBird records (https://ebird.org/species/eurbla/ES-MD). However, and addressing just the translation from the original in Spanish, the apparent bird is the “mirlo (from Latin merulus) común” which happens to be a ”zorzal”, thus, “zorzal común” or “zorzal negro” (common or black zorzal). Notwithstanding and as you stated, the true “zorzal negro” is a South American bird. Otherwise, it is difficult to attribute any birding skill to the author who may have exercised a degree of poetic license in describing a “flitting” blackbird.

Finally, allow me to introduce two disclaimer notes. First, different from English, there’s no standardized naming of birds in Spanish-speaking countries other than their scientific or, odd enough, sometimes their English names. Second and last, I have only briefly birded in urban Spain and Italy, and I never saw either bird.

I hope this is at least minimally helpful!
Good luck!
Franklin Díaz

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 13, 2020, at 6:13 PM, Drew Whitelegg <drewwhitelegg1...> wrote:
>
> Hi all,
> I'm wondering if anyone could help with a birding translation question -
> I'm hoping this is OK to post on this site and I apologise if not.
>
> A friend of mine is translating a Spanish novel (set in Spain) in which the
> author refers to "zorzales negros" flitting around in the Valley of the
> Fallen. I edit my friend's work and I pulled her up on her translation of
> this as "Black Thrush". I said there was no such bird in Europe, and after
> some checking she located a "Glossy-black Thrush" in Argentina...which of
> course would not apply.
>
> Of course the author may mean simply Blackbird (Turdus merula)- which in
> Europe IS a thrush...but they don't flit around (I'm from England, so I've
> seen a few!). My feeling, knowing the bird, would be to suggest Black
> Redstart (Phoenicurus ochruros)...which isn't a thrush, I know, but would
> certainly fit the habitat.
>
> Bird names are wonderfully parochial, and my question is if anyone has any
> knowledge of such localized names in Spain, especially with Redstarts
> (which are closer to thrushes than warblers, which they are in the US).
>
> Again, I hope this is of sufficient interest to have posted here.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help,
> Drew Whitelegg
> DeKalb Co.
>
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