Date: 1/13/20 1:06 pm
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] mystery bird
I also saw a Robin on top of Hunger Mountain on December 25th. I wouldn't
be surprised to find more robins higher on Camel's Hump.

R

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 6:17 AM Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> wrote:

> Whoops. Forgot to add, that my second hand source was Spencer Hardy, and
> he has ebird entries of robins on Burrows Trail, Camels Hump Jan 4, 2020.
> Liz
>
> > On Jan 12, 2020, at 6:12 AM, Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...>
> wrote:
> >
> > I’ve heard second hand reports of flocks of robins being seeing up high
> this winter, feeding on mountain ash berries.
> > Liz Lackey
> > Stowe, VT
> >
> >> On Jan 11, 2020, at 10:57 PM, Sarah Fellows <towanda2...>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> hi, I just read a chapter in Bernd Heinrich's book "One wild bird at a
> time", in which he describes redpolls finishing at his feeders, then
> ,playing" in the snow making grooves and tunnels. He hypothosizes that they
> were remembering reponses to conditions and
> >> that in the high artic they do this to survive .Perhaps this bird is in
> a position at 4,000 feet to draw on survival behavior that we do not
> usually see here.
> >> But redpolls are smaller than robin size of course,but robins do not
> look like grouse, and perhaps other irrupting northern birds, like pine
> grosbeak, or other large finch types might burrow in cold weather.
> >>
> >> Sally fellows
> >> Williston
> >> Migrants exhibit this behavior. Grosbeaks
> >>
> >>> On Jan 11, 2020, at 5:04 PM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> My guess is that it was a Ruffed Grouse. They erupt from under the
> snow if they’re startled by walkers, hikers or dogs (considerably startling
> the walkers, hikers and dogs in the process!). They’re bigger than robins,
> but it’s not always easy to determine size when you get just a quick glance
> and you’re startled.
> >>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >>>
> >>>> On Jan 11, 2020, at 3:49 PM, Teage O'Connor <badger.meli...>
> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> Last night I hiked up Camel's Hump. Just as we were approaching the
> summit
> >>>> (about 9pm), my dog flushed a bird from under the last fir/spruce
> trees. It
> >>>> nearly flew into me before veering off course and off into the thick
> >>>> clouds. While I didn't see exactly where it was roosting, it seemed
> like it
> >>>> erupted from the ground (or beneath the snow). The bird was roughly
> robin
> >>>> sized and flew with rapid, steady flapping, and it's wings didn't
> whistle
> >>>> or thump when it flew. First, how startling to encounter a bird at
> 4000' in
> >>>> the winter. And second, what are the possible options for what bird
> this
> >>>> would be? There aren't a lot of eBird reports on Camel's Hump for
> winter.
> >>>>
> >>>> --
> >>>> Teage O'Connor
> >>>> CrowsPath.org <https://crowspath.org/> | Phyllotaxy.com
> >>>> <https://www.phyllotaxy.com/>
> >>>>
> >>>> *Subscribe to the Wild Burlington natural history newsletter*
> >>>> https://www.phyllotaxy.com/newsletter-signup/
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 
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