Date: 11/19/19 10:26 am
From: Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] How Climate Change Will Affect Birds in Your Area | Audubon
Haven’t seen this posted on Monterey Bay Area bids and thought many of your might be interested. You can put in your zip code to check your area’s projected prospects.
>
> https://www.audubon.org/climate/survivalbydegrees/county?zipCode=95065 <https://www.audubon.org/climate/survivalbydegrees/county?zipCode=95065>
>
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> Audubon <https://www.audubon.org/> <https://www.audubon.org/climate/survivalbydegrees/county?zipCode=95065#> <https://www.audubon.org/climate/survivalbydegrees/county?zipCode=95065#>Take Action <https://www.audubon.org/takeaction> Donate Now <https://action.audubon.org/support/donate-now?ms=digital-fund-web-website_nas-topmenu>
> <https://www.audubon.org/climate/survivalbydegrees>
> Home <https://www.audubon.org/climate/survivalbydegrees/> About the Study <https://www.audubon.org/survival-degrees-about-study> Explore Impacts Near You <https://www.audubon.org/climate/survivalbydegrees/visualizer> Audubon's Climate Initiative <https://www.audubon.org/conservation/climate-initiative> Take Action <http://act.audubon.org/onlineactions/CPFvaM5HCUq49MB_LJl6UA2?ms=policy-adv-web-website_nas-reportfooter-20191010_best_act_reportfooter_climatereport_menu&sourceid=1221442> Become a Climate Advocate <https://act.audubon.org/onlineactions/gtbJYh6LRk-k_m3b15VAow2?ms=policy-adv-web-website_nas-reportfooter-20191010_local_climate_signup_menu&sourceid=1221444>
> Vulnerable Birds in Santa Cruz County
>
> Highly and moderately vulnerable birds may lose more than half of their current range—the geographic area where they live—as they are forced to search for suitable habitat and climate conditions elsewhere.
> Below, find out which of the birds that nest or spend the winter in your area are most vulnerable across their entire range. Some birds may lose range outside of your state, making the protection of their current habitat in your area even more important.
>
> Warming scenario:
> +1.5 ℃+2.0 ℃+3.0 ℃
> Why these temperatures?
> Season:
>
> What is a season?
> High Vulnerability Species
> 23
>
> Common Goldeneye
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/common-goldeneye#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Common Goldeneye
>
> Eared Grebe
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/eared-grebe#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Eared Grebe
>
> Vaux's Swift
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/vauxs-swift#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Vaux's Swift
>
> Allen's Hummingbird
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/allens-hummingbird#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Allen's Hummingbird
>
> Northern Pygmy-Owl
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/northern-pygmy-owl#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Northern Pygmy-Owl
>
> Spotted Owl
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/spotted-owl#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Spotted Owl
>
> Acorn Woodpecker
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/acorn-woodpecker#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Acorn Woodpecker
>
> Nuttall's Woodpecker
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/nuttalls-woodpecker#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Nuttall's Woodpecker
>
> Olive-sided Flycatcher
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/olive-sided-flycatcher#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Olive-sided Flycatcher
>
> Western Wood-Pewee
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/western-wood-pewee#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Western Wood-Pewee
>
> Bushtit
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/bushtit#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Bushtit
>
> Pygmy Nuthatch
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/pygmy-nuthatch#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Pygmy Nuthatch
>
> Swainson's Thrush
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/swainsons-thrush#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Swainson's Thrush
>
> Hermit Thrush
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/hermit-thrush#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Hermit Thrush
>
> California Thrasher
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/california-thrasher#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> California Thrasher
>
> Red Crossbill
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/red-crossbill#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Red Crossbill
>
> Lawrence's Goldfinch
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/lawrences-goldfinch#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Lawrence's Goldfinch
>
> Black-chinned Sparrow
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/black-chinned-sparrow#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Black-chinned Sparrow
>
> Dark-eyed Junco
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/dark-eyed-junco#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Dark-eyed Junco
>
> White-crowned Sparrow
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/white-crowned-sparrow#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> White-crowned Sparrow
>
> Savannah Sparrow
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/savannah-sparrow#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Savannah Sparrow
>
> Orange-crowned Warbler
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/orange-crowned-warbler#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Orange-crowned Warbler
>
> Wilson's Warbler
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/wilsons-warbler#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Wilson's Warbler
> Search Another Location
>
> or
>
> State
>
> How Will the California Quail's Range Be Affected in Santa Cruz County?
>
> Rising temperatures and shifting weather patterns affect birds’ ability to find food and reproduce, which over time impacts local populations, and ultimately continent-wide populations, too. Some species may even go extinct in your state if they cannot find the resources they need to survive and raise their young.
>
> Select a warming scenario to see how this species’ range will change under increased global temperatures.
>
> <>
> California Quail
>
> Coveys of sharply marked California Quail scurry through chaparral along much of the Pacific Slope today, but warming of 3 degrees could make up to three-quarters of that range unsuitable in some seasons. Heat waves and increased fire risk pose serious threats to this bird’s brushy habitats. If warming is limited to 1.5 degrees, quail could continue to thrive in over half their current range.
> View this bird > <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/california-quail#bird-climate-vulnerability>
> Warming scenario:
> Current+1.5 ℃+2.0 ℃+3.0 ℃
> Why these temperatures?
> Season:
>
> What is a season?
> Map Legend
> What's a range?
> Range gained
> Improving
> Slightly improving
> Stable
> Slightly worsening
> Worsening
> Range lost
> Range maintained
> <https://www.mapbox.com/>
> © Mapbox <https://www.mapbox.com/about/maps/> © OpenStreetMap <http://www.openstreetmap.org/about/> Improve this map <https://apps.mapbox.com/feedback/?owner=audubon&id=ck0zmdu7804xb1cml7qkvk94w&access_token=pk.eyJ1IjoiYXVkdWJvbiIsImEiOiJjanpicnQ4MW4wMm5jM2hxc2N0ZXRxdHhxIn0.QF0x2XfBUBNiJa9NpCRUQw>
> Reducing warming makes many types of birds found in Santa Cruz County less vulnerable.
>
> Without immediate, urgent action to reduce carbon emissions, global temperatures could rise by 3.0°C in the coming decades, endangering birds in your area. The threat is drastically reduced if we curb greenhouse gases and we limit warming to 1.5°C, giving the same birds a chance to not only survive but thrive.
>
> Click the three different warming scenarios to explore how increased warming puts more species in Santa Cruz county at risk.
>
> Warming scenario:
> +1.5 ℃+2.0 ℃+3.0 ℃
> Why these temperatures?
> Overall Vulnerability:
> Stable
> Low
> Moderate
> High
> Season:
>
> What is a season?
> MORE VULNERABLE
> LESS VULNERABLE
> Aridland Birds
> 19 species
> Boreal Forest Birds
> 9 species
> Coastal Birds
> 14 species
> Eastern Forest Birds
> 4 species
> Generalist Birds
> 37 species
> Grassland Birds
> 6 species
> Marsh Birds
> 30 species
> Waterbirds
> 15 species
> Western Forest Birds
> 38 species
> California's Birds and Habitats
>
> Wetlands in Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge attract migratory waterfowl and songbirds. In Yosemite National Park, Acorn Woodpeckers <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/acorn-woodpecker> and Black Swifts <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/black-swift> take shelter in the coniferous forests, while Mountain Bluebirds <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/mountain-bluebird> and California Gulls <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/california-gull> breed at Mono Lake. The oak woodlands in the foothills of the Central Valley and Central Coast Range are home to state gems, such as the Yellow-billed Magpie <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/yellow-billed-magpie>, while coastal estuaries support millions of migratory waterbirds. The Mojave Desert provides critical habitat for resident and migratory birds including the Cactus Wren <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/cactus-wren>.
>
> Audubon California is actively engaged in protecting birds and their critical habitat through its conservation programs <https://ca.audubon.org/internal-tagging/conservation> and Audubon’s Conservation Ranching program <https://www.audubon.org/conservation/ranching>.
>
>
> Climate Policy in California
>
> Electricity Generation Breakdown
> 47%
>
> RENEWABLE
> 6.2% Wind
> 2.8% Biomass
> 20.6% Hydro
> 11.8% Solar
> 8.7%
>
> NUCLEAR
> 43.1%
>
> FOSSIL FUEL
> 43% Natural Gas
> .1% Coal
> 1.1%
>
> OTHER
> Greenhouse Gas Emissions Targets
> 40%
> BELOW 1990 levels by 2030
> 80%
> BELOW 1990 levels by 2050
> Renewable Portfolio Standard
> 60%
> BY 2030
> Climate Alliance?
> Member of US
> No
>
> (Data: U.S. EIA <https://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=CA>)
>
> The Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 <http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/05-06/bill/asm/ab_0001-0050/ab_32_bill_20060927_chaptered.pdf> created a statewide greenhouse-gas emissions target, and its renewals in 2016 <https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160SB32> and 2017 <https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB398> extended and strengthened its goals. The state’s cap-and-trade program <https://ww3.arb.ca.gov/cc/capandtrade/capandtrade.htm> has led to a steady decline in carbon emissions while the program’s revenues <https://grist.org/article/so-what-did-california-do-with-that-1-4-billion-in-cap-and-trade-money/> have funded climate mitigation and adaptation projects nationwide. Guided by its climate action plan <https://ww3.arb.ca.gov/cc/cleanenergy/clean_fs2.htm>, California aims to reach 100-percent carbon-free electrical generation and statewide carbon neutrality by 2045.
>
> California supports sustainable growth <http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/07-08/bill/sen/sb_0351-0400/sb_375_bill_20080930_chaptered.pdf> and is working with Audubon California to adopt a Natural and Working Lands Implementation Plan <http://resources.ca.gov/climate/natural-working-lands/>. The state’s focus on natural and working lands—farms, forests, wetlands, and ranches—as indispensable is another way it’s leading the country on climate solutions.
>
>
> Climate Threats Facing Birds and People in Santa Cruz County
>
> Increased severity and frequency of drought in California <https://archive.epa.gov/epa/sites/production/files/2016-09/documents/climate-change-ca.pdf> threatens water supplies and agriculture, while rising temperatures have decreased snowpack levels and increased heat waves. Large-scale wildfires have caused tens of billions of dollars in damages. Sea levels could rise one to four feet in the next century, submerging wetlands and harming coastal communities.
>
> The same climate change-driven threats that put birds at risk harm people, too. Hover over or tap an area on the map to see specific threats that will affect that area as warming increases.
> Warming scenario:
> +1.5 ℃+3.0 ℃
> Why these temperatures?
> Number of threats
>
> 1
> 2
> 3
> 4
> 5
> 6
> <https://www.mapbox.com/>
> © Mapbox <https://www.mapbox.com/about/maps/> © OpenStreetMap <http://www.openstreetmap.org/about/> Improve this map <https://apps.mapbox.com/feedback/?owner=audubon&id=ck0zmdu7804xb1cml7qkvk94w&access_token=pk.eyJ1IjoiYXVkdWJvbiIsImEiOiJjanpicnQ4MW4wMm5jM2hxc2N0ZXRxdHhxIn0.QF0x2XfBUBNiJa9NpCRUQw>
>
> Drought
> Drought destroys water and food resources for many species.
>
> False Spring
> False springs (unseasonably warm, mid-winter days) “trick” plants into flowering early.
>
> Fire Weather
> Wildfires incinerate habitat, and if they burn repeatedly, prevent it from recovering.
>
> Urbanization
> Cities demolish bird habitat, and are often located in the places birds need.
>
> Spring Heat Waves
> Spring heat waves endanger young birds in the nest.
>
> Heavy Rain
> Heavy rainfall can flood nests and impede parents from feeding their chicks.
>
> Lake Level Rise
> Rising lake levels flood coastal habitat important to nesting birds.
>
> Cropland Expansion
> Growing agriculture destroys bird habitat—though farms can be designed and managed to be friendlier to birds.
>
> Sea Level Rise
> Sea level rise permanently consumes coastal habitat.
>
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>
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