Date: 10/2/19 7:24 pm
From: 'Jackie P' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Off-Topic: Update on Opt Out of Aerial Pesticide Spraying -- FW: For Opt Out - Please Complete Survey Link
So, I get that EEE is a seemingly dangerous disease, and I’m not an expert at mosquito diseases, but in 2015 more people in Michigan died from vehicle collisions with deer than this disease caused this year. I did take general ecology though and remember learning that if you kill off 99% of the skeeters, and there’s just 1% left, they might be immune to the pesticide, and then they reproduce... I guess maybe I missed the part where this spraying was going to eliminate EEE?

Also - Is it just BTI to be sprayed - where did you see that? Its a combo of several diff pesticides (see any article on it).

Jackie



Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 2, 2019, at 5:19 PM, Susan Horvath <shorvath...> wrote:
>
> I just don't get it. 3 people have died THIS YEAR in Michigan. People
> have died in Massachusetts and Connecticut THIS YEAR. Horses have
> died. Deer have died.
>
> All pesticides are not equal. More to the point, to this particular
> group, is that Bt is *not* just one bacteria known to kill
> caterpillars (aka bird food).
>
> Those of you who grow anything in the cabbage family in your vegetable
> gardens know that the best, and coincidentally organic, control of
> cabbageworms is Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki.
> Btk does kill caterpillars. It does *NOT* kill mosquitos.
> *NOBODY* is suggesting aerial spraying with Btk.
>
> However, another naturally occurring strain of Bt bacterium is
> Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis. Bti kills mosquito larvae. It does
> *NOT* kill caterpillars. Aerial spraying, if it happens, will be to
> spray Bti.
>
> We all know and love Cornell's Lab of Ornithology (ebird etc). Cornell
> also has a well-respected veterinary school. Here is what the vet
> school says about Eastern Equine Encephalitis:
>
> "Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus (EEE) is an arbovirus which is a
> mosquito-borne virus. It circulates between bird reservoir hosts and
> mosquitoes. Most infected animals and people have inapparent
> infections, but EEE can cause mortality in some species of birds such
> as pigeons, pheasants, and emus.
>
> Mammals are incidental hosts and humans and horses are the most common
> mammals to develop clinical disease. EEE has also caused illness in
> pigs, rodents, and white-tailed deer.
>
> The majority of wild birds infected with the virus will exhibit no
> clinical signs.
>
> Transmission occurs from the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitos
> become infected with EEE when they take a blood meal from a bird that
> is carrying the virus. Mosquitos then transmit the virus to other
> birds during subsequent blood meals, continuing the cycle. EEE is not
> transmitted by direct contact."
>
> Yes, Washtenaw County has decided that it's far enough from the EEE
> problem, that it doesn't need to spray Bti at this time. But, that
> could
> change. Butterflies and moths are *NOT* at risk from aerial spraying
> of Bti. Neither are the birds. Humans, horses, our burgeoning
> population of deer, and even our dogs, *are* at risk if we don't spray
> Bti.
>
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> <CWHL-FactSheets-EEE.pdf>

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