Date: 9/29/19 9:40 am
From: Lisa Larson <lisafaylarson...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Monterey County vs. Santa Cruz County fall migration mystery
Hi birders!

I think Randy is right . . . the birds are indeed flying directly south
across the bay. Why follow the land inland and use more time and energy
when a direct flight will get them south sooner? They do have a long way
to go.

I read that the majority of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds fly directly across
the Gulf of Mexico rather than taking a longer route across land, even at
the peril of exhaustion and a watery death.

The birds seem to have a choice, but perhaps they are magnetically "wired"
to go as directly as possible, which is supported by the fact that most
migrating happens at night. Our bay is just a little blip when compared to
a body of water like the Gulf of Mexico!

Topography must also play a factor in this. North Santa Cruz County has
mountains, whereas the Monterey Peninsula is low,-lying and an inviting
place to rest.

Just some thoughts.

- Lisa

On Sat, Sep 28, 2019, 8:23 PM Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:

> Looking at the Monterey County rarities that have been found the past
> several days, we see species such as Red-eyed Vireo, Yellow-throated Vireo,
> Plumbeous Vireo, Painted Bunting, and warblers such as, Black and White,
> Virginia, Blackpoll, Chestnut-sided, Tennessee, and Prairie, along with
> today's find of a Great-crested Flycatcher. Meanwhile, in Santa Cruz County
> we have the continuing Red-footed Booby that has been here for almost a
> year and one White-throated Sparrow in my back yard. I cannot figure out
> why there are not more fall migration rarities spotted in Santa Cruz
> County. With over 10,000 eBird reports so far this year, it's not like
> there aren't enough birders out searching for rarities. For some reason,
> which escapes me, Santa Cruz County seems to get bypassed by many of the
> rare species during their fall southern migration. I have heard that many
> warblers and other land species have been seen landing on boats out in the
> bay during this time of year to rest. This begs the question...Do most
> migrating species fly south directly over Monterey Bay waters from
> somewhere up the coast to the area around the Monterey Peninsula where they
> stop to rest? Why is it that every year so many more rare species are found
> during migration in the Monterey/Carmel/Pacific Grove area than in Santa
> Cruz County. Does anyone know the answer to this question? I would be very
> interested in hearing from other birders as to why they think this
> migration phenomena happens year after year.
>
> Randy Wardle
> Aptos
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "mbbirds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<CY4PR2201MB1304BB691EDAE7ED477ED408C3830...>
> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<CY4PR2201MB1304BB691EDAE7ED477ED408C3830...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "mbbirds" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/CAOr7VNOq_giUW4G2YRtBrwCcKB9QbNEyPmcf%<3DXT52jMZV5JRkA...>

 
Join us on Facebook!