Date: 9/26/19 12:27 pm
From: Philip Kline <pgeorgekline...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Red Crossbill Types
I agree with Tom here. Types 2 and 3 sound quite distinctive to me and I
don't consider myself a particularly skilled earbirder. The others,
perhaps not so much. Also agree that getting a good recording is key so
you can back up your ID with a spectrogram.

On Thu, Sep 26, 2019, 12:01 PM Tom Crabtree <tc...> wrote:

> And a friendly rebuttal – not true. IDing types by ear is possible, β€œTo
> be able to identify all individuals of each call type with 100% certainty,
> audiospectrographic analysis is needed.” https://ebird.org/news/recrtype/
>
>
>
> Tom
>
>
>
> *From:* Alex Lamoreaux [mailto:<aslamoreaux...>]
> *Sent:* Thursday, September 26, 2019 11:48 AM
> *To:* <pgeorgekline...>
> *Cc:* OBOL; <eskyrimh...>; <tc...>
> *Subject:* Re: [obol] Re: Red Crossbill Types
>
>
>
> And just another friendly reminder that call types cannot be determined
> without analyzing the spectrogram of a recording. IDing the types by ear is
> not possible.
>
>
>
> Alex
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Sep 26, 2019 at 12:01 PM Philip Kline <pgeorgekline...>
> wrote:
>
> Hi Erik:
>
>
>
> In my fairly limited experience in Northwestern Oregon, the general rule
> of thumb seems to be that Type 3 is more common in the Coast Range and the
> west side of the Cascades (this is the type I've identified most often in
> the general Portland area), Type 10 is usually found on the immediate coast
> and nowhere else, and Type 4 can often be found in the Cascades, but
> doesn't seem to be particularly common. All this is with a huge dollop of
> uncertainty and the caveat as Lars notes that they are so nomadic they can
> be completely absent (or at least much harder to find) from these areas for
> long periods. I would be curious to hear from others with more experience
> if any of these general assumptions are incorrect.
>
>
>
> Philip Kline
>
>
>
> On Thu, Sep 26, 2019, 10:19 AM Tom Crabtree <tc...> wrote:
>
> Type 2’s can be found in profusion around Bend & Sisters.
>
>
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
>
>
> *From:* <obol-bounce...> [mailto:<obol-bounce...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Erik Haney
> *Sent:* Thursday, September 26, 2019 10:08 AM
> *To:* <obol...>
> *Subject:* [obol] Red Crossbill Types
>
>
>
> Good Day,
>
>
>
> I'm inquiring on the different types of Red Crossbill that can be found in
> Oregon, preparing
>
> for a trip from October 30th to November 10th mostly all over Oregon from
> Bend/Sister area
>
> to Medford/Ashland area and three days along the whole coast south to the
> north. Are
>
> the different types specific to certain areas in the state or are they
> more habitat specific?
>
>
>
> Thank you for any feedback with this question
>
>
>
> Erik Haney
>
> Saint Petersburg, Florida
>
> --
>
> Alex Lamoreaux
>
> 717-943-7086
>
> Naturalist and Senior Leader/North America Specialist for Wildside Nature
> Tours
> https://wildsidenaturetours.com/team-member/alex-lamoreaux/
>

 
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