Date: 9/16/19 6:00 pm
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Will history repeat itself?

Yes history will repeat itself. What are the plans for the next Ice Age?? Exactly how many have there been? And lest not kid ourselves it will happen, not in our life time but then the "mass" extinct of every thing alive wont happen in our live time either.

Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Monday, September 16, 2019, 3:28:35 PM EDT, Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> wrote:

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The historical perspective is very valuable. Most people do not have a concept of “deep time”. Our lives are so short in comparison to the “life” of the world that being reminded of deeper time is important for all of us. Thanks for laying this out so well.

 

Sally Scheer

 

 

From: Alan Ryff [mailto:<alryff...>]
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 5:58 PM
To: Birders UM
Subject: [birders] Will history repeat itself?

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710843100772

 

Will history repeat itself?

At the onset of white settlement, the Cardinal was restricted to the southern half of Ohio and unknown in Michigan.  Expanding agricultural settlements with their clearing of deep woodlands during the early and mid 1800’s changed the landscape, favoring birds of grassland, coppice and forest edge, birds that can survive the exceptional snowfalls of an occasionally severe winter. 

At some point during the last decades of the nineteenth century the Cardinal expanded into Michigan.    By 1910 its status was that of a rather rare bird confined to the southern half of the Lower Peninsula, more likely to be encountered in the southern three tiers of counties.

But the times keep changing.  Today, the Cardinal is common over the greater part of the Lower Peninsula, thanks in part to the growing number of urban municipalities with their ornamental shrubs and winter bird feeders.  And the Cardinal’s range keeps expanding northward with increasing appearances in communities along the Lake Superior shoreline.

Is the Blue Grosbeak as a summer resident following the Cardinal’s northward expansion?

Consider: The first verified Ohio record of a summering Blue Grosbeak was not until 1940 in Adams County located along the Ohio River.   Today, it is locally a rare to uncommon nester in at least eight southern Ohio counties.  As far back as 1988 there was an unsuccessful nesting in Oak Openings, Lucas County, which shares its boundary with Monroe County, Michigan.  By 2019 at least eight Michigan counties have had summering Blue Grosbeaks, all but one in the southern three tiers, the exception being Iron County which adjoins Wisconsin.        

The habitat of the Blue Grosbeak and that of the Cardinal differs.  The Cardinal prefers weedy areas along woodland edges and brushy thickets.  But it also thrives in urban shrubbery.  The Blue Grosbeak on the other hand favors open, almost barren, weedy areas having scruffy hedge rows and perhaps a tree or two  or at best an isolated row of trees.   It also perches and sings in cornfields as I discovered at two locations in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Alan

 

Note: Photo # 7: The chestnut fringes of this male's greater coverts  have worn away.  Therefore this bird exhibits only one chestnut wing bar, that of the median coverts. 

Note: Photo # 8: This female is tail twitching, a characteristic habit.

 

 

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