Date: 9/3/19 2:52 pm
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
The species I'm most worried about, other than thousands of Bahamian humans
of course, is the Bahama Nuthatch. Either a subspecies of Brown-headed
Nuthatch, or a full species, it is found only on the island of Grand
Bahama. It was feared extinct as it had not been seen in a couple years,
but a few were found in the past year in pine forests on the eastern side
of the island.

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: <amazilia3...>
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/




On Tue, Sep 3, 2019 at 5:33 PM 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <
<birders...> wrote:

> John:
>
> Don't forget that birds have great low-frequency hearing. They can hear a
> major storm before it arrives and seek safety elsewhere. Fingers crossed
> that both species had the wisdom and foresight to remove themselves to
> southern islands.
>
> There was significant concern about the Puerto Rican Parrot following
> Hurricanes Irma and Maria. A few individuals on the east side of the island
> survived. Fingers crossed.
>
> Bill Rapai
> Grosse Pointe
>
> "Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: John Lowry <john...>
> To: Bill Rapai <brapai...>
> Cc: birders <birders...>
> Sent: Tue, Sep 3, 2019 2:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration
> (Kirtland's warblers)
>
> Good to know regarding the Kirtland’s. Very interesting that they should
> move northeast to stage.
>
> The devastatingly sad for birds seems to be the endemics. The Bahama
> Nuthatch and the Bahama Parrot may have nested for the last time for all
> eternity. I don’t know about you, but when I hear of an extinction it’s a
> deep hurt.
>
> Good birding,
>
> John
>
>
>
> On Sep 3, 2019, at 2:18 PM, 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <
> <birders...> wrote:
>
> Ken:
>
> To answer your question about potential impacts of Dorian on the
> Kirtland's Warbler population, my guess would be minimal.
>
> A few years ago, Nathan Cooper of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
> put geotrackers on a handful of male Kirtland's. When the geotrackers were
> recovered the following year, he discovered that the data showed each of
> the birds spent the month of September and the first part of October in
> Ontario near Algonquin Provincial Park.
>
> It seems that the birds learned that they should not go back to the
> Bahamas too early to avoid potential risks.
>
> Now, the next question is, What impact did Dorian have on the winter
> habitat? My guess again would be minimal. Dorian absolutely wiped out some
> of the northern pine-dominate islands. The warblers tend to winter on the
> southern islands that are dominated by coppice habitat. If the warblers
> happen to land on Grand Bahama Island during migration they will likely
> find food but not much shelter. You will be amazed how quickly insects
> repopulate an island after a disaster like a major hurricane.
>
> Bill Rapai
> Grosse Pointe
>
> "Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
> To: birders <birders...>; Larry Nooden <ldnum...>
> Sent: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 9:21 pm
> Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration
> (Kirtland's warblers)
>
> I found an old article about fall migration of Kirtland's Warbler based on
> a 1971 net specimen. Did not send a lot more time on it, but found another
> list of ample enough fall records to indicate this species arrives on its
> wintering grounds later than ... right now.
> With all the Hurricane Dorian news of catastrophic damage in the Bahamas,
> I bet others are also concerned about survival rates of the rare birds
> there.
>
> I'm hoping in the coming days to read something on the Tropical Audubon
> Society's Bird Board, but perhaps some experts could weigh in with their
> knowledge to help us all understand if our concerns are well-founded or if
> the birds will come through this like they have for millenia.
>
> I'm hoping that many if not the majority of Kirtland's Warblers will still
> be on the mainland at this time.
> -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama (two OLD eBird records of Kirtland's
> here in Alabama, fyi. 1908 and 1936, both spring sightings, if memory
> serves)
> On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 03:09:23 PM CDT, Larry Nooden <
> <ldnum...> wrote:
>
>
> (2017). "Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)."
> Science 355(6329): 998-999.
>
> The Kirtland's warbler travels thousands of kilometers in about 2 weeks.
> https://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6329/998
> "Fifty years ago, fewer than 400 Kirtland's warblers were left in their
> summer habitat in upper Michigan. The species, Setophaga kirtlandii, became
> one of the first beneficiaries of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Forest
> managers planted more jack pines—which the songbird needs for its summer
> nests—and the population of the species increased 10-fold. But even so,
> only about 40% of the birds survive the annual migration to the Bahamas and
> back. Researchers wanted to learn more about their round-trip route, so
> they outfitted 50 warblers with tiny geolocators weighing just 0.5 grams.
> Every 2 minutes, the geolocators record the intensity of light, a measure
> of sunrise and sunset that can be used to calculate latitude and longitude.
> In the fall, the team learned, the warblers headed east over Ontario to the
> Atlantic coast, then south to the Bahamas. For the spring leg, the warblers
> flew west and made a stop in Florida before turning north toward Michigan,
> the team reported last week in the Journal of Avian Biology. Each way, they
> travel about 4500 kilometers in about 16 days. Knowing the locations of
> those stopovers, the researchers note, is a starting point for improving
> the bird's protection."
>
> More about the use of this tool:
>
> GAP has delineated species range and predicted distribution maps for more
> than 2,000 species that occur within the continental US as well as Alaska,
> Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Our goal is to build species range maps and
> distribution models with the best available data for assessing conservation
> status, conservation planning, and research.
>
> https://www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/science-analytics-and-synthesis/gap/science/species-data-overview
>
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