Date: 8/27/19 5:46 am
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] garden fence
You can also deter birds from fruit by using "bird tape" - shiny metallic
ribbon tied to branches or sticks and available from garden supply stores.
It's kept bird damage to a minimum on our cherries. I gave up netting
years ago when I found a dead bird trapped therein.

On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 8:37 AM david merker <buteojamaica...>
wrote:

> Great exerience, but Your fence should not be able to catch a
> hummingbird...If it can tangle a hummingbird it can tangle all sorts of
> small birds. Maeve, you should look to replace your bird catching fence!...
> I can provide some great alternative suggestions. We have gone to
> graduated, small at the bottom larger at the top moveable fence for our
> garden. Works great. We remove it for winter. It has kept everything out
> but the birds, who are great partners in the garden. For berrys we now use
> remey instead of bird trapping berry netting. Agribon Row cover fabric for
> berries.
> https://www.premier1supplies.com/garden_wildlife/fencing.php?fence_id=34
> for garden. there are many versions to shop for the garden...
> VersaNet&#174; Plus 9/20/3 Electric Netting for Garden & Wildlife -
> Premier1Supplies<
> https://www.premier1supplies.com/garden_wildlife/fencing.php?fence_id=34>
> Effective electric netting that protects gardens, beehives and sweet corn.
> It keeps out raccoons, woodchucks, small dogs, rabbits, wild pigs, opossums
> and skunks.
> www.premier1supplies.com
>
>
>
>
> David Merker
> Etna, New Hampshire
> Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.
>
> www.capemayraptors.org<http://www.capemayraptors.org>
> <https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>
>
> #deletefacebook<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic
> digest system <LISTSERV...>
> Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 12:00 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 25 Aug 2019 to 26 Aug 2019 (#2019-212)
>
> There are 18 messages totaling 1088 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. One Pelican or Two? (4)
> 2. Moving to North Carolina, Thanks for the Memories
> 3. broad-winged hawks
> 4. rescue of a hummingbird (7)
> 5. Unusual Canada gooose
> 6. Westminster Station Nighthawk Count (4)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 05:12:26 -0400
> From: Jim Mead <jimmead4...>
> Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?
>
> VT birders,
>
> Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of the
> pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head and
> the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
> Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
> (Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance look
> at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing no black on
> the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
> "suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen 20
> days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
> Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb) shows
> no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
> transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
> "appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th, Henry
> Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that it
> had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip end
> of the lower mandible.
> Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
> sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird seen at
> Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
> markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot say
> for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that the
> pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.
>
> It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.
>
> Enjoy Birds,
>
> Jim Mead
>
> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <birddiva...> wrote:
>
> > Greetings All!
> >
> > At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American
> White
> > Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come out
> to
> > join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of
> folks
> > who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
> > both.
> >
> > After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or one
> > bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the
> Hen
> > Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper
> photo
> > <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch (Hen) and then Juli Filberti's
> > photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
> >
> > So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our
> phones
> > to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the
> molting
> > explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
> >
> > David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
> >
> > Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
> > timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
> > elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it was
> > found again in Campbell Bay.
> >
> > Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
> > conversation!
> >
> > Bridget
> >
> > *Bridget Butler*
> >
> > *Bird Diva Consulting*
> > *PO Box 613*
> > *St. Albans VT 05478*
> > *(802) 393-4147*
> > *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <
> http://www.birddiva.com>*
> > *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva> <
> http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> > *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> > *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <
> http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
> > >*
> > *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
> >
> >
> > <
> >
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
> > >
> > Virus-free.
> > www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
> > <
> >
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
> > >
> > <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 10:52:39 +0000
> From: Mike Resch <mresch8702...>
> Subject: Moving to North Carolina, Thanks for the Memories
>
> After 26 years in New England I’m retiring to the mountainsof western
> North Carolina. I’ve had agreat time birding throughout the region, and
> greatly appreciate all the helpprovided by Vermont birders. Althoughsome
> of the best VT birding was a long drive from home, limiting my VT list
> to282, I still enjoyed lots of fond birding memories like –
> “Pelagic trips” on Lake Champlain with Little Gull(10/19/13) and Sabine’s
> Gull (9/9/17)
> Fall passerine trips to the southeast part of the statefinding a
> Connecticut Warbler (9/27/16) and Blue Grosbeak (10/12/18)
> Seeing a Yellow-crowned Night Heron by flashlight atBomoseen SP on 8/31/15
> (on my 3rd try)
> Slowly ticking off those shorebird species at places likethe Colchester
> Causeway, Goose Bay, Dead Creek, etc.
> Poring through goose flocks in Vernon to find Cackling andBarnacle Geese
> (3/28/07) -though I couldn’t pick out the Barnacle after it andthe rest of
> the flock flew out over NH airspace
> Those large Snow Goose flocks, with an occasional Ross’s, inAddison
> Finding Grebe and Scoter flocks on inland lakes duringmigration. Not to
> mention rarer“coastal” waterfowl like Harlequin Duck (3/23/06) and King
> Eider (11/30/17) Now I’m looking forward to learning more about the birds
> of themountains of NC and beyond. Afterall,just like New England, there
> are a lot of states nearby -SC and TN are justshort drives away. One
> species I’m especiallylooking forward to learning about is the Swainson’s
> Warbler that breeds in themountainous rhododendron thickets – I’ve never
> seen them in that habitat.
> Also now that I’m retired from my 9-to-5 job, I’m starting abird guiding
> company - 50 States Birding. I’m putting my knowledge of birdingin all 50
> states to use in providing two guiding options:
>
> 1. Traditional guiding services where Iaccompany birders in the field to
> help find target species or in general birdan area that is new to them.
>
> 2. A unique research-based service whereI provide birders with customized
> information to help them bird an area ontheir own. In this lower-cost
> option Iuse on-line research supplemented with my own personal knowledge of
> the area toidentify birding sites that best meet the client’s objectives.
> Then for each site I provide a downloadablePDF including maps, lists of
> expected species, tips to find key species, andgeneral suggestions on how
> to bird each site. (sorry for the commercial)
> If your travels take you to the mountains of western NC, orplaces nearby,
> send me an e-mail – perhaps we could bird together (Swainson’sWarbler
> anyone?) Plus I can catch up onall those rarities I’ve missed back in New
> England.
>
> Mike Reschwww.statebirding.blogspot.comHendersonville, NC
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 07:47:33 -0400
> From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...>
> Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?
>
> Hi all,
> I’m so glad there is a discussion on this. I noticed black on the head in
> some photos of the Pelican, and none in others and was wondering about molt
> transitions. I hadn’t taken the time to follow up on this so am glad
> others did. I have not been up to actually see the bird myself.
>
> Meanwhile, I’m attempting to enter more molt details on ebird. This time
> of year there is quite a range of plumage characteristics. Obviously I
> can’t get the same detail as if I had them in the hand during a banding
> procedure (thanks Chris Rimmer and crew for sharing so much of your
> knowledge with me during the Mt Mansfield bird banding project), but at
> times plumage/age state it is very evident when looking at warblers,
> thrushes, sparrows, etc etc thru binocs. This info on ebird will add to
> our knowledge of dispersal of young birds, adult non-breeding etc.
>
> My local breeding pair of Broad-winged Hawks are looking pretty dapper
> now. Most of their flight feathers have been replaced so I expect them to
> think about heading out to South America soon. It has been fun to watch
> them go from scruffy, overworked parents, with many gaps in their wings, to
> plump bodied, crisply-edged winged soaring machines once again.
>
> Enjoy molts and migration.
>
> Liz Lackey
> Stowe, VT
>
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 5:12 AM, Jim Mead <jimmead4...> wrote:
> >
> > VT birders,
> >
> > Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of the
> > pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head
> and
> > the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
> > Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
> > (Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance
> look
> > at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing no black on
> > the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
> > "suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen 20
> > days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
> > Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb)
> shows
> > no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
> > transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
> > "appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th,
> Henry
> > Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that it
> > had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip
> end
> > of the lower mandible.
> > Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
> > sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird seen
> at
> > Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
> > markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot
> say
> > for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that
> the
> > pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.
> >
> > It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.
> >
> > Enjoy Birds,
> >
> > Jim Mead
> >
> > On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
> wrote:
> >
> >> Greetings All!
> >>
> >> At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American
> White
> >> Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come
> out to
> >> join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of
> folks
> >> who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
> >> both.
> >>
> >> After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or one
> >> bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the
> Hen
> >> Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper
> photo
> >> <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch (Hen) and then Juli
> Filberti's
> >> photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
> >>
> >> So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our
> phones
> >> to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the
> molting
> >> explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
> >>
> >> David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
> >>
> >> Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
> >> timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
> >> elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it
> was
> >> found again in Campbell Bay.
> >>
> >> Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
> >> conversation!
> >>
> >> Bridget
> >>
> >> *Bridget Butler*
> >>
> >> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> >> *PO Box 613*
> >> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> >> *(802) 393-4147*
> >> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <
> http://www.birddiva.com>*
> >> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>
> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> >> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> >> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <
> http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
> >>> *
> >> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
> >>
> >>
> >> <
> >>
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
> >>>
> >> Virus-free.
> >> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
> >> <
> >>
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
> >>>
> >> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
> >>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 08:36:35 -0400
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?
>
> Interesting research and speculation, Jim. It does seem more likely that
> one bird has undergone some plumage changes than that two rare vagrants
> have shown up at the same time in the same area - but anything is possible!
> That’s what makes birding so much fun.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 5:12 AM, Jim Mead <jimmead4...> wrote:
> >
> > VT birders,
> >
> > Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of the
> > pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head
> and
> > the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
> > Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
> > (Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance
> look
> > at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing no black on
> > the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
> > "suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen 20
> > days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
> > Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb)
> shows
> > no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
> > transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
> > "appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th,
> Henry
> > Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that it
> > had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip
> end
> > of the lower mandible.
> > Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
> > sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird seen
> at
> > Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
> > markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot
> say
> > for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that
> the
> > pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.
> >
> > It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.
> >
> > Enjoy Birds,
> >
> > Jim Mead
> >
> > On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
> wrote:
> >
> >> Greetings All!
> >>
> >> At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American
> White
> >> Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come
> out to
> >> join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of
> folks
> >> who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
> >> both.
> >>
> >> After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or one
> >> bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the
> Hen
> >> Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper
> photo
> >> <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch (Hen) and then Juli
> Filberti's
> >> photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
> >>
> >> So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our
> phones
> >> to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the
> molting
> >> explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
> >>
> >> David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
> >>
> >> Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
> >> timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
> >> elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it
> was
> >> found again in Campbell Bay.
> >>
> >> Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
> >> conversation!
> >>
> >> Bridget
> >>
> >> *Bridget Butler*
> >>
> >> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> >> *PO Box 613*
> >> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> >> *(802) 393-4147*
> >> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <
> http://www.birddiva.com>*
> >> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>
> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> >> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> >> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <
> http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
> >>> *
> >> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
> >>
> >>
> >> <
> >>
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
> >>>
> >> Virus-free.
> >> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
> >> <
> >>
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
> >>>
> >> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
> >>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 11:37:39 -0400
> From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
> Subject: broad-winged hawks
>
> A flight of six over North Pomfret
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 12:48:53 -0400
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> Subject: rescue of a hummingbird
>
> I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out to
> the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard an
> odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing
> noise that I didn’t know hummers could make.
> I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 13:32:36 -0400
> From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
> Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird
>
> How wonderful. Maeve! Thank you for helping... and for sharing this with
> us!!
>
> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 12:49 PM Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> wrote:
>
> > I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
> to
> > the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard
> an
> > odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> > Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> > inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> > second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost
> singing
> > noise that I didn’t know hummers could make.
> > I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> > from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> > hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
>
>
> --
> Miriam Lawrence
> <mirslamlawrence...>
> (c) 802-238-1830
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:34:32 -0400
> From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
> Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird
>
> That does generate a warm feeling inside. Thank-you
>
> Rich Guthrie
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 1:34 PM Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
> >
> wrote:
>
> > How wonderful. Maeve! Thank you for helping... and for sharing this with
> > us!!
> >
> > On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 12:49 PM Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
> > to
> > > the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I
> heard
> > an
> > > odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> > > Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> > > inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> > > second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost
> > singing
> > > noise that I didn’t know hummers could make.
> > > I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> > > from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held
> a
> > > hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> > > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Miriam Lawrence
> > <mirslamlawrence...>
> > (c) 802-238-1830
> >
>
>
> --
> Richard Guthrie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 16:35:30 -0400
> From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2...>
> Subject: Unusual Canada gooose
>
> A squadron of 12 geese floated by me this morning at Birdland, north hero.
> Leading was a goose with the usual chinstrap, but it melded into a white
> cap on its head!!!!.
> I ran along the shore to take photos,but they were just a little to far
> out to pick up the head color.Maybe it dunked into some paint??????
>
> Sally Fellows
> North hero
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 21:36:23 +0000
> From: anneboby <anneboby...>
> Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird
>
> Maeve - as a hummer bander who has banded over 5700 of them, and in the
> process allowed dozens of attending observers the opportunity to hold one
> of these avian jewels in their hand for release, the response from all
> these people has been one of absolute awe and amazement...a life-changing
> moment for them awakening them to a whole new world.
> I am pleased that you are now among them.
> Bob YunickSchenectady, NY
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> To: VTBIRD <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Mon, Aug 26, 2019 12:49 pm
> Subject: [VTBIRD] rescue of a hummingbird
>
> I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out to
> the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard an
> odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing
> noise that I didn’t know hummers could make.
> I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 17:48:02 -0400
> From: Jill Vickers <jvickers...>
> Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird
>
> Kayaking at 3 on The Otter in Vergennes, I spotted a green heron on
> shoreline. Did not see if it was fishing with bait, but did see it catch a
> fish, swallow it and hop a few steps before deficating. I eventually
> spooked it and got to see it in flight. Highlight of paddle.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 3:34 PM, Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
> wrote:
> >
> > That does generate a warm feeling inside. Thank-you
> >
> > Rich Guthrie
> >
> >
> > On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 1:34 PM Miriam Lawrence <
> <mirslamlawrence...>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> How wonderful. Maeve! Thank you for helping... and for sharing this with
> >> us!!
> >>
> >> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 12:49 PM Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >>> I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
> >> to
> >>> the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I
> heard
> >> an
> >>> odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> >>> Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> >>> inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> >>> second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost
> >> singing
> >>> noise that I didn’t know hummers could make.
> >>> I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> >>> from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held
> a
> >>> hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> >>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Miriam Lawrence
> >> <mirslamlawrence...>
> >> (c) 802-238-1830
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Richard Guthrie
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 19:41:22 -0400
> From: Sue <2birdvt...>
> Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird
>
> I too have had the thrill of a hummer rescue. A friend called to say she
> had a hummer on her porch and it wasn't finding its way out. So I went down
> and observed this tiny bird up high at a small window. A ladder was secured
> and I climbed up to the bird and slowly brought my hand towards the trapped
> bird. As I enclosed my hand about the hummer she relaxed and I took her
> outside and released her. Off she went free as a bird!
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
> >
> > I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
> to the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I heard
> an odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost singing
> noise that I didn’t know hummers could make.
> > I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 20:10:31 -0400
> From: Donald Clark <sapsbks...>
> Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>
> Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string of
> 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.
>
> Don Clark
> Grafton
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 20:58:47 -0400
> From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...>
> Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>
> Gail Yanowitch and I watched in Stowe Village from 6-7:45p. We had 105
> for a total. The birds stayed foraging overhead for quite awhile offering
> great looks. They drifted northward, then southward, then northward and
> finally disappeared to the south. Our largest group was 51.
>
> I’m going to watch from my front porch tomorrow. I think I’ll be able to
> see most of the flight from this vantage point. It will be so amazing if
> it works. Will keep you all posted!
>
> Liz Lackey
> Stowe
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:10 PM, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:
> >
> > Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string
> of 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.
> >
> > Don Clark
> > Grafton
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 21:46:43 -0400
> From: Pat Folsom <pfols...>
> Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>
> Wonderful reports. I tried a spot in Waitsfield (UCC) this evening that
> was productive last night. NO luck tonight, only 4 last night.
>
> Pat in Waitsfield
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Liz Lackey" <lackeytomliz...>
> To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 5:58:47 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>
> Gail Yanowitch and I watched in Stowe Village from 6-7:45p. We had 105
> for a total. The birds stayed foraging overhead for quite awhile offering
> great looks. They drifted northward, then southward, then northward and
> finally disappeared to the south. Our largest group was 51.
>
> I’m going to watch from my front porch tomorrow. I think I’ll be able to
> see most of the flight from this vantage point. It will be so amazing if
> it works. Will keep you all posted!
>
> Liz Lackey
> Stowe
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:10 PM, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:
> >
> > Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string
> of 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.
> >
> > Don Clark
> > Grafton
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 21:57:20 -0400
> From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...>
> Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>
> And just for a relative comparison, a lone nighthawk headed in the general
> direction of Westminster observed a late summer gathering of about two
> hundred people enjoying a terrific locally-sourced dinner and some great
> locally-sourced music in the meadow at Crossmolina Farm in West Corinth
> Saturday evening.
>
> Charlie La Rosa
> So. Washington
>
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 9:46 PM Pat Folsom <pfols...> wrote:
>
> > Wonderful reports. I tried a spot in Waitsfield (UCC) this evening that
> > was productive last night. NO luck tonight, only 4 last night.
> >
> > Pat in Waitsfield
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Liz Lackey" <lackeytomliz...>
> > To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
> > Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 5:58:47 PM
> > Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
> >
> > Gail Yanowitch and I watched in Stowe Village from 6-7:45p. We had 105
> > for a total. The birds stayed foraging overhead for quite awhile
> offering
> > great looks. They drifted northward, then southward, then northward and
> > finally disappeared to the south. Our largest group was 51.
> >
> > I’m going to watch from my front porch tomorrow. I think I’ll be able to
> > see most of the flight from this vantage point. It will be so amazing if
> > it works. Will keep you all posted!
> >
> > Liz Lackey
> > Stowe
> >
> > > On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:10 PM, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:
> > >
> > > Finally a great night. We tallied 564 birds in 3 hours with one string
> > of 188 birds. Hopefully this is only the start.
> > >
> > > Don Clark
> > > Grafton
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 22:16:02 -0400
> From: Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti...>
> Subject: Re: One Pelican or Two?
>
> My two cents….
>
> I took advantage of a calm day and spent the afternoon kayaking back out
> to the pelican today. I got very close and got myself some pretty close up
> views of the head. It was not at all concerned with my presence there, btw.
> Here is my checklist. https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S59297323
>
> After a good look today, I believe it is the same bird. This bird has a
> tinge of black remaining on the back of his head that you can see in one of
> my photos. I think it has molted most of the black in the time it has spent
> here, and has a little more left to go.
>
> It was a great day on the water!
> Julie
>
>
> > On Aug 26, 2019, at 8:36 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
> >
> > Interesting research and speculation, Jim. It does seem more likely that
> one bird has undergone some plumage changes than that two rare vagrants
> have shown up at the same time in the same area - but anything is possible!
> That’s what makes birding so much fun.
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >
> >> On Aug 26, 2019, at 5:12 AM, Jim Mead <jimmead4...> wrote:
> >>
> >> VT birders,
> >>
> >> Bridget brings up a very good question. I looked at several photos of
> the
> >> pelican seen at Hen Island on July 21 & 22. They show black on the head
> and
> >> the tip end of the lower mandible. According to info found in The Sibley
> >> Guide to Birds, that particular look fits well for an adult summer bird
> >> (Jun-Aug). Then on Aug. 10th myself & others got a very long distance
> look
> >> at a pelican at Campbell Bay and noticed that it was showing no black
> on
> >> the head, which at that time I mentioned in my eBird report that it
> >> "suggested" that this pelican was not the same pelican as the one seen
> 20
> >> days earlier at Hen Island. I did a bit more research recently using The
> >> Sibley Guide again and saw that an adult non breeding bird (Sep-Feb)
> shows
> >> no black on the head or at the tip end of the lower mandible. Thus, the
> >> transition from adult summer plumage to adult non breeding plumage
> >> "appears" to occur during the months of July & August. On Aug. 24th,
> Henry
> >> Trombley & I saw the pelican at Campbell Bay from a canoe and saw that
> it
> >> had very little black showing on the head and no black seen on the tip
> end
> >> of the lower mandible.
> >> Now, because 20 days (pretty much 3 weeks) had passed between the two
> >> sightings (July 21-Aug 10), it seems "possible" to me that the bird
> seen at
> >> Hen Island "could" have had enough time to loose most of its' black
> >> markings. I am certainly no expert at determining that info so I cannot
> say
> >> for sure if that is true. However, it does seem (again-"possible") that
> the
> >> pelican seen at both locations "could" be the same bird.
> >>
> >> It would be interesting to read others opinions on this.
> >>
> >> Enjoy Birds,
> >>
> >> Jim Mead
> >>
> >> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:48 PM Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Greetings All!
> >>>
> >>> At Birds & Beers VT the other night we got talking about the American
> White
> >>> Pelican sightings. We were in the Islands so many folks who had come
> out to
> >>> join us had seen the bird and some had taken photos. We had a mix of
> folks
> >>> who had seen a pelican at the Hen Island site, the Campbell Bay site or
> >>> both.
> >>>
> >>> After a bit, we got to talking about whether there were two birds or
> one
> >>> bird that had possibly molted. So we started comparing photos from the
> Hen
> >>> Island bird and the Campbell Bay bird. We used the Islander newspaper
> photo
> >>> <http://bit.ly/2U21Nq0>s by David Marsch (Hen) and then Juli
> Filberti's
> >>> photos <http://bit.ly/33Xz1eH> she got from a kayak (Campbell).
> >>>
> >>> So, here's our question that was left unanswered as we all used our
> phones
> >>> to try to look up info on molting for this species and decipher the
> molting
> >>> explanation on Birds of North America Online...IS IT THE SAME BIRD?
> >>>
> >>> David's photos show black on the back of the head while Julie's do not.
> >>>
> >>> Please explain why or why not as we were all trying to grapple with the
> >>> timing of molting for this species and whether or not enough time had
> >>> elapsed between when the bird was seen on Hen Island and then when it
> was
> >>> found again in Campbell Bay.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks for playing along & helping us extend our Birds and Beers
> >>> conversation!
> >>>
> >>> Bridget
> >>>
> >>> *Bridget Butler*
> >>>
> >>> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> >>> *PO Box 613*
> >>> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> >>> *(802) 393-4147*
> >>> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <
> http://www.birddiva.com>*
> >>> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>
> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> >>> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> >>> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <
> http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
> >>>> *
> >>> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> <
> >>>
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
> >>>>
> >>> Virus-free.
> >>> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
> >>> <
> >>>
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
> >>>>
> >>> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
> >>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 22:25:18 -0400
> From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
> Subject: Re: rescue of a hummingbird
>
> Many years ago a hummingbird flew into my garage through the overhead
> door. I found it trying to get out through the closed window of the
> opposite wall, repeatedly bumping itself into the glass. If I hadn't been
> there to free it, I suppose it would have (eventually) either turned itself
> around and flown out through the overhead door, or exhausted itself against
> the window. In any case, catching and releasing the bird was a memorable
> experience.
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 7:41 PM Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
>
> > I too have had the thrill of a hummer rescue. A friend called to say she
> > had a hummer on her porch and it wasn't finding its way out. So I went
> down
> > and observed this tiny bird up high at a small window. A ladder was
> secured
> > and I climbed up to the bird and slowly brought my hand towards the
> trapped
> > bird. As I enclosed my hand about the hummer she relaxed and I took her
> > outside and released her. Off she went free as a bird!
> > Sue Wetmore
> >
> > Sent from my iPod
> >
> > > On Aug 26, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> wrote:
> > >
> > > I had an extraordinary and touching experience this morning. I went out
> > to the garden for the morning harvest, and as I stood picking cakes I
> heard
> > an odd whirring noise close by. There was an immature Ruby-throated
> > Hummingbird caught in the mesh fencing of the garden, his bill and head
> > inside the garden and the rest of his tiny self outside. It took only a
> > second or two to free him, but all the while he made a high almost
> singing
> > noise that I didn’t know hummers could make.
> > > I am SO happy that I went into the garden then, rather than a few hours
> > from now, and still touched and delighted that I - for a second - held a
> > hummingbird and was able to set it free.
> > > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 25 Aug 2019 to 26 Aug 2019 (#2019-212)
> *************************************************************
>


--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
 
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