Date: 7/10/19 9:14 pm
From: <t4c1x...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Interesting peep
Owen,
It is tough to make a good assessment of a bird in such ratty plumage. That said, there are a couple of things which do suggest Long-toed Stint: the long central toes, and the rather heavy bill. Also the supercilium appears to kind of wrap around the auriculars, but it is hard to tell. However, the lack of the dark feathering of the forehead extending to the base of the bill, and the lack of yellow bill base (as Alan mentioned) would argue against that id.
Nevertheless, I would not necessarily write off the possibility of Long-toed Stint. Did you have a chance to observe behavior and stance? Some years ago I saw a stint of that species at Eckman Slough, east of Waldport. Rick Krabbe of Corvallis came the next day, saw the bird, and agreed with my assessment. What struck me most about the bird was the fact its posture and feeding habits were very distinct from the Least Sandpipers, which fed close by. The slough at that point is a fairly level mudflat (at that stage of tide), next to a grassy marsh three feet higher. Between the mudflat and the marsh there are a series of small hummocks, about a foot high and a foot and a half in diameter, each holding a sparse cover of stiff grass or sedge of some kind. While the Leasts fed in their typical crouched posture on the mudflat, the stint stayed almost exclusively among the hummocks, running from one to another, clambering up and over them, picking in a somewhat frenzied manner, and frequently standing in an upright stance. The behavior was so distinct from that of the Least Sandpipers, that I recognized it as something different almost immediately.
Some years ago I wrote of this on OBOL. I received a reply (wish now I could remember from whom it came) from a birder, who had seen numbers of Long-toed Stints in Russia. He commented that what I had described was typical for the species, and added he considered the distinctive behavior would make it rather easy for birders to identify an individual, which happened to show up in Oregon.





From: "Owen Schmidt" <oschmidt...>
To: "OBOL" <obol...>, "Portland Area Birds" <portland-area-birds...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2019 7:47:58 PM
Subject: [obol] Interesting peep


…… yesterday and today at the Troutdale Sewage Pond (Multnomah) found by Colby Neuman. The bird shows some characteristics of Long-toed Stint. I took the photo below this afternoon.

[ mailto:<oschmidt...> | <oschmidt...> ]
Wednesday, July 10, 2019






 
Join us on Facebook!