Date: 6/2/19 3:55 pm
From: Stephen Mirick <smirick...>
Subject: [NHBirds] Nice coastal day (Caspian & Arctic Terns, Parasitic Jaeger, 2 Mourning Warblers, etc.)
For the 2nd straight day, the coast was wrapped in fog.  But that
doesn't mean the birding wasn't any good!  It kept the beach goers away
and it led to a few nice birds.  The first week of June marks the end of
spring migration, but there are still some migrants around.  Random
comments of species seen today:

RED-NECKED GREBE - 2 lingering birds.  One off Great Boar's Head and
another (continuing) bird off Little Boar's Head.  Also a lot of
lingering Black Scoters and a couple of Surf Scoters and two
Red-throated Loons today.

BLACK GUILLEMOT - Two from Little Boar's Head.  Seems to be a lot around
this spring.

PURPLE SANDPIPER - 3 continue at Ragged Neck in Rye thanks to a tip from
Jim Sparrell.  I always tell people Purple Sandpipers are fairly common
in May right up until the last day of May and then they disappear
abruptly.  I only have 3 other June sightings.  Ten on 6/1/98, eight on
6/1/03, and five on 6/6/03.  So these are my 2nd latest records.  There
are mid-summer records from the Isles of Shoals.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevemirick/47988787102/in/photostream/lightbox/

RUDDY TURNSTONE - 4 continue at Ragged Neck in Rye.  Nice breeding
plumage males and females.

SHOREBIRDS - Other than the noteworthy Purples and turnstones, we had
remarkably few shorebirds this weekend.  Spring shorebird migration
continues well into June, but we only had a couple of Semipalmated
Plovers today and no sandpipers or Black-bellies or dowitchers.  The
Killdeer nest in the parking lot at Ragged Neck now has babies running
around!

ARCTIC TERN - 1 adult found by Leo Mckillop at Pulpit Rocks in Rye. Nice
find and perhaps a result of the foggy weather.  This bird performed
remarkably well and stuck around for about an hour so many people got to
see it.  Although they nest out on White and Seavey Islands, they can be
very difficult to find along the shoreline.  I have very few records
over the years.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevemirick/47988836721/in/photostream/lightbox/

CASPIAN TERN  - 1 apparently migrating north off Odiorne.  Although I
only saw the tail end of this bird flying away, I am fairly confident
this is what I saw.

ROSEATE TERN - Perhaps 7 or 8 foraging with the assorted terns at Pulpit
Rocks.  Beautiful birds.  Some with a nice rosy breast.  One bird was
color-banded and we are going to see if we can look up the numbers we
read off of it.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevemirick/47988786937/in/photostream/lightbox/

PARASITIC JAEGER - A shocking surprise.  As I was photographing the
Purple Sandpiper at Ragged Neck, I looked up and saw a bird flying
north.  I thought it was a Laughing Gull until I got my binoculars on
it!  Fortunately, I got a decent photo before it passed by.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevemirick/47988778647/in/photostream/lightbox/

MOURNING WARBLER - 2 (!).  Always a nice bird to get along the coast, it
was nice to see two today.  And great looks at both. First a female (or
possibly young male) along the entrance road at the Seabrook wastewater
treatment plant.  Nice views in the misty fog from about 20 feet away
while we sat in the car!!!  Then a second bird....an adult male at
Ragged Neck in Rye.  Jane first spotted it in the lone bush toward the
point near the event tent. It foraged and preened in here for a while,
then started flying all over the place.  From bush to bush as it word
west off of the point.  We got great looks but it too a while before I
(finally) got a documentation photo when it landed on a log in the open
near the cove at the parking area.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevemirick/47988785983/in/photostream/lightbox/

MIGRANT WARBLERS - We had a decent number of late migrant warblers
today.  Other than the Mourning Warblers, which are notorious for
migrating in late May and early June, we also had a lot of late migrant
Magnolia Warblers and American Redstarts, and also had a couple of
Canada Warblers.  Numbers should quickly dwindle over the next week.

MIGRANT FLYCATCHERS - Not as many as I hoped for.  Jason Lambert had a
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher near Ragged Neck, but we only managed an 
Alder Flycatcher at Odiorne a couple of Pewees, and a couple of
unidentified empidonax flycatchers.

BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO - A cuckoo was a pleasant surprise at the tip of
Frost Point.  Perhaps an overnight arrival in the fog.


Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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