Date: 5/12/19 10:34 am
From: Kathy Van Der Aue via CTBirds <ctbirds...>
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Eli Whitney mystery warbler and confusing age terminology
I go by the age determinations set forth in Peter Pyle's book which we use
for bird banding. A spring bird of this plumage would be a second year
male. I welcome other banders to correct me if I'm wrong.

Kathy Van Der Aue
Southport, Connecticut
Visit my Blog at http://naturaliststable.wordpress.com


On Sun, May 12, 2019 at 11:23 AM C Wood via CTBirds <
<ctbirds...> wrote:

> Helpful explanations, David. For anyone interested in delving into this
> terminology challenge, here’s a link to a comprehensive article from 2000:
> Plumage and Molt Terminologyhttps://
> sora.unm.edu/sites/default/.../27-43%20OB%20Vol%2018%231%20Apr2000.p… <
> https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=12&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiOqta2pZbiAhUJ-6wKHdmnAL4QFjALegQIAhAC&url=https%3A%2F%2Fsora.unm.edu%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2F27-43%2520OB%2520Vol%252018%25231%2520Apr2000.pdf&usg=AOvVaw30glN9aE53DSggjkupEZpM
> >
>
> Chris Wood
> Woodbury, CT
> 203 558-0654
>
> Flickr: C.S.Wood-Photos <https://www.flickr.com/photos/cswood-photos/>
> Blog: WoodWarbling <http://cswood022.blogspot.com/?m=0>
>
>
> > On May 12, 2019, at 11:02 AM, Spector, David (Biology) via CTBirds <
> <ctbirds...> wrote:
> >
> > There is a lot of confusion in ageing terminology, which is reflected in
> people identifying the mystery male American Redstart as "first year" or
> "second year," meaning the same thing.
> >
> > As with a few other male song birds (e.g., Red-winged Blackbird), male
> American Redstarts take a bit over a year to reach full ("definitive") male
> plumage, with variation among individual males in the first year of life
> (some looking more "female-like" and others looking more "male-like").
> >
> > The bird in question is roughly 11 months old. He is in his first
> breeding season (thus the label "first year") and in its second calendar
> year (thus the label "second year," or "SY"). If everything goes well for
> this bird he will molt into his definitive adult male plumage at the end of
> this breeding season, and by the fall migration (when it will be roughly 15
> months old) he will probably be indistinguishable from older males.
> Although it takes a little over a year to grow full adult plumage, a male
> does not appear in breeding season in adult plumage until he is nearly two
> years old (in his third calendar year--thus the impression that it takes
> three years to appear adult).
> >
> > The word "yearling" for such individuals might reduce confusion.
> >
> > David
> >
> > David Spector
> > Belchertown, Massachusetts
> >
> > P.S. Feather generation terminology adds another level of potential
> confusion. The bird in question probably has two or three generations of
> feathers. The primaries, secondaries, tail feathers, and primary coverts
> are probably "juvenal" (or "juvenile"), most of the rest of the feathers
> are probably "first basic" (or "formative"), and some feathers might be
> "first alternate."
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> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)
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