Date: 2/5/19 2:40 pm
From: Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Use of drones in birding
Here is a link to

Managing Conflicts between Birds and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)
National Audubon Society, Science Division
Best Practices Brief (12 June 2015)

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goldengateaudubon.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_ManagingDroneConflicts.pdf&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7z8gm8VJndQ1FodArODu1NlY0xoy7UZfEkX88R_D5_0&s=jSwTb18950de9qAq-WFx5YisvzVZ5tEXc_rbwwOppcA&e=


Jay Wherley
Asheville, NC

On Tue, Feb 5, 2019 at 4:32 PM Randy <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Have not read much in the media concerning use of drones for birding,
> such as flyby snapshots and filming, or even just non-recorded video. This
> may have been well discussed here and in the literature and I have just
> simply missed it because I am a more casual birder than some of you more
> serious types.
>
> My question to the list serve is what are the ethics concerning this, if
> any have indeed been established? Do species identified with this method
> qualify as having been observed for life list purposes?
>
> These questions came to mind as I was reading a story on MSN about an
> osprey in Aruba flying off with an unidentified relatively large blue reef
> fish of some kind (possible Blue Tang?) with camera apparently looking
> "eyeball to eyeball' at the same level with the osprey. The story said the
> observer was shooting from the side of a highway with a hand-held camera,
> but it raised the question with me about using drones to find many more
> opportunities for observations. Before anyone jumps on me about this, I've
> never done it and don't plan to.
>
> Randy Climpson
> Sunset Beach, NC
>

 
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