Date: 1/22/19 10:26 am
From: Henry Link <linkh...>
Subject: Re: Waterfowl Sarah P Duke Gardens
Harry,

Do you or anybody else recall a winter sometime in the early 1990s when it was though that an "invasion" of Delmarva Mute Swans had spread across northeastern NC and into the Piedmont? My recollection is that there were about a dozen at the Cane Creek Reservoir in Orange County that winter and four as far west as Winston-Salem.

Henry Link
Greensboro, NC


On Jan 22, 2019, at 1:11 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:

> Mute Swans had -- I'm not sure they still have -- a well-established breeding population on the Delmarva Peninsula, particularly 10-30 years ago. I am aware that wildlife folks in MD and other states were trying to eliminate the populations owing to damaging the marsh habitats there, and perhaps for other reasons to remove exotic species from natural habitats.
>
> It was assumed that the occasional Mute Swan that showed up on the Outer Banks for short periods, particularly at North Pond, were from this "countable by ABA rules" population on the Delmarva Peninsula, as they did not nest anywhere near the Outer Banks. Most sightings were of single birds, and none stayed for a year or more. Thus, at some point in the 1980s, the NC Bird Records Committee put the species on the Official List. However, that does not mean that any sighting of Mute Swan in NC was or still is countable, at least for your NC life list. The intent of the Official status was that birds believed to have come from well-established populations to the north of NC were countable (but not swans seen elsewhere in the state).
>
> However, we all know that Mute Swans have local year-round breeding populations now, such as at Airlie Gardens in Wilmington, and you-name-it-local-park in most cities in NC and SC, and also in parts of coastal SC. In my personal opinion, these birds should not be counted on your ABA list or NC list, but that would really be up to you to make that call. However, as totals are submitted and displayed online on the ABA website (# of species but not the lists themselves), it is hoped that everyone is "playing by the same rules". This same matter came up recently, as the NC Big Year totals by Derb Carter in 2008 and Jamie Adams in 2018 both had -- I believe -- Mute Swan, but not from the Outer Banks. And, I made the same statements above about the intent of the Official status for Mute Swan, that swans outside the northeastern part of the state should not count on a year list, state life list, etc. So, their 351 species each do not include Mute Swan.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> NC Bird Records Committee
>
> On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 11:59 AM Henry Link <linkh...> wrote:
> How about Mute Swans?
>
> Henry Link
> Greensboro, NC
>
> On Jan 22, 2019, at 11:49 AM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>
>> Please do not think that you can report Muscovy Duck to eBird in Florida. "wild and countable" is an ambiguous description but the issue is clearly dealt with in the article, which you should read.
>> Kent Fiala
>> On 1/22/2019 11:44 AM, scompton1251 wrote:
>>> Muskovies are now considered wild and countable in Florida. Although,they sure are tame there, as opposed to,the very wary ones we saw on the Lower Tio Grande.
>>>
>>> Steve Compton
>>> Greenville, SC
>>>
>>> Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
>>>
>>> ------ Original message------
>>> From: Kent Fiala
>>> Date: Tue, Jan 22, 2019 10:06 AM
>>> To: <carolinabirds...>;
>>> Cc:
>>> Subject:Re: Waterfowl Sarah P Duke Gardens
>>>
>>> eBird has a whole page just on Muscovies: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_en_portal_articles_2259953-2Dreporting-2Dmuscovy-2Dducks-2Dto-2Debird&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9CV2y8YQE5HTAbpaxyX-XMKOritm5zkEB4OPgORjagg&s=ctJ6VNbmGp2M2zxe9glCsSDJ9kTK4-Oh0tLDxtDOzj0&e=
>>> Kent Fiala
>>> On 1/22/2019 9:42 AM, David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>>> A more problematic area is the extent to which free-flying individuals of obviously domestic ancestry should be reported. Muscovy ducks are breeding around the campus pond at Gardner-Webb and occasionally fly if they have to get somewhere faster than a waddle, but they're brown and white and unquestionably not wild strays from the Rio Grande.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 8:59 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>> Thanks Kent! The purpose of eBird is to record data on wild (native and introduced) birds. Captive, ornamental birds are great to look at and enjoy, but again, please do not eBird these. This includes the Duke birds, the pintail etc. up near Asheville, birds at the zoo or Sylvan Heights, etc. Currently eBird does not have a way for the reviewers to automatically remove these known ornamental birds, requiring manual intervention each and every time.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> In addition to requiring eBird reviewers to manually invalidate the records, they also feed to national and state rare bird alerts. This has the effect of making NC look a bit dull when we keep reporting pintail on the national RBA, and could potentially cause someone who has not performed background research to spend money and burn carbon in order to travel to one of these “rarities”, which are in fact ornamental birds purchased and transported to the state for the purpose of enjoyment.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Steve Shultz
>>>>
>>>> Apex NC
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Kent Fiala
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 7:10 AM
>>>> To: <carolinabirds...>
>>>> Subject: Re: Waterfowl Sarah P Duke Gardens
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.
>>>>
>>>> Please do not eBird any waterfowl at Duke Gardens. As the eBird reviewer for the area, I invalidate all such reports. Here is the information that I send to people who report from there:
>>>>
>>>> Waterfowl at Duke Gardens are pinioned and are thus considered captive. eBird asks that you don't report captive birds; please see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_portal_articles_973921&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9CV2y8YQE5HTAbpaxyX-XMKOritm5zkEB4OPgORjagg&s=tF0u2UEvz1TwNq-Vi1CQBqDIvkUEhkWOjg9IJ5_jjqc&e= (paragraph near the bottom). Thanks.
>>>>
>>>> Also see this video about pinioned birds at Duke Gardens: https://today.duke.edu/2016/03/new-waterfowl-arrive-duke-gardens#video
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately I was a little slow about invalidating some recent reports due to being away on a birding trip, and they remained in the rare bird sightings for a while.
>>>>
>>>> Kent Fiala
>>>> On 1/22/2019 4:01 AM, M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Are the waterfowl reported on ebird at the Sarah P Duke Gardens in Durham, NC aviary birds or wild? My guess is aviary.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Mae Howell
>>>>
>>>> Goldsboro, NC
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Powered by Cricket Wireless
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr. David Campbell
>>> Associate Professor, Geology
>>> Department of Natural Sciences
>>> Box 7270
>>> Gardner-Webb University
>>> Boiling Springs NC 28017
>


 
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