Date: 12/4/18 7:34 pm
From: Shawneen Finnegan <shawneenfinnegan...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Fwd: Re: Most Undercover Rarity?
When I moved to Cape May eons ago it took me a long time to recognize Winter Wren calls because they sound so much like Song Sparrows to me. Sometime to ponder if you hear a Song Sparrow giving its call note in doubles.

Shawneen

> On Dec 4, 2018, at 6:27 PM, Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...> wrote:
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>> On Dec 4, 2018, at 6:18 PM, Philip Kline <pgeorgekline...> wrote:
>>
>> That's a good one George. A species that has surely been present in Oregon before. Perhaps several times. It shows up regularly in Arizona in winter, although that is admittedly much closer to its regular winter range. Winter Wrens breed as far west as NE British Columbia. While the vast majority likely migrate east of the Rockies, surely a small number stray to the west.
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> I agree completely. I don’t think one necessarily has to go to Malheur NWR either. A good day trip (even perhaps this late in the year) in the small towns of Sherman County might have good results in time.
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> Almost strangely, the only one I think I have ever seen was in Arizona, since my trips east have been in spring, summer and fall (except at airports and a few hours on frigid Long Island). The one I saw in Arizona was easier to identify than I thought it would be. There was a Pacific Wren only a few hundred yards away. While hearing the calls may be critical, the plumage differences were not extremely subtle.
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