Date: 11/14/18 8:01 am
From: Bob Archer <rabican1...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Sparrow ID help
Well I have tried to id subspecies. First issue is to decide which
subspecies you will look for. I have based my info on Rising and Beadle,
Birds of Oregon, Pyle's Vol 1 and this paper:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/50914233_Concordant_and_Discordant_Signals_Between_Genetic_Data_and_Described_Subspecies_of_Pacific_Coast_Song_Sparrows

I have a list of the possible subspecies based on this info and I try to
cram each bird into one of the subspecies I have decided are possible for
Oregon.

Assume winter sparrows may not be the same as summer birds, and assume Song
Sparrows move to riparian areas and south (even down from SE Alaska or
beyond) during winter. Happy hunting and good luck, you will need it. But
it can be fun, I botched my most interesting meeting with a Song Sparrow,
found a monster of a bird along the Deschutes River and messed up the
photos I was counting on to id the thing. Wish I could see that one again.

Bob Archer
PDX

On Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 8:08 PM Nicholas Mrvelj <nickmrvelj...>
wrote:

> Tim,
>
> That is a Song Sparrow. It does appear rather pale and streaked on the
> back, likely indicating a different subspecies than you currently expect.
>
> Speaking of which, who out here has cracked the Song Sparrow code by the
> way and can give a break down of the myriad regional subspecies? I’d love
> to hear from that person if he/she exists.
>
> Good Birding,
> -Nick Mrvelj (Portland)
>
> On Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 8:00 PM Tim <timberwolf69...> wrote:
>
>> Saw this little guy in North Bend when I was checking out some ducks and
>> a nice group of Greater Yellowlegs. I'll hold off on my guess after looking
>> at ID sites.
>>
>> Tim Gannon
>> Reedsport
>>
>>

 
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