Date: 11/5/18 12:49 pm
From: eBird alert <alert.ebird...>
Subject: [sbcobirding] [eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert
*** Species Summary:

- Red-necked Phalarope (2 reports)
- Tropical Kingbird (1 report)
- Gray Catbird (5 reports)
- Sage Thrasher (2 reports)
- Clay-colored Sparrow (2 reports)
- Harris's Sparrow (4 reports)
- American Redstart (2 reports)
- Palm Warbler (7 reports)

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Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 10:35 by John Callender
- Ocean Beach County Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.6909567,-120.6003785&ll=34.6909567,-120.6003785
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49687167
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "In the channel near the entrance road. Dark, streaky back; dark eye patch; thin, needle-like beak."

Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 09:26 by Jasen Liu
- Ocean Beach County Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.6909567,-120.6003785&ll=34.6909567,-120.6003785
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49690050
- Comments: "Late individual swimming in saltmarsh area. Streaking on dark back, needle-like bill separating from winter REPH"

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Nov 05, 2018 10:45 by Christopher Michalek
- Andree Clark Bird Refuge, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4215353,-119.6572856&ll=34.4215353,-119.6572856
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49700927
- Comments: "Continuing- Seen perched in the large half dead tree between the tracks and 101 about halfway down the trail. The flying south toward the cemetery."

Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 12:35 by Joshua Stacy
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49680933
- Comments: "Continuing with photos."

Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 11:57 by Santiago Lupi
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49678872
- Comments: "Flew from the creek to a pepper tree around the benches. Large and Overall gray with black cap and tail."

Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 09:10 by Joan Lentz
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49682873
- Comments: "This bird was found yesterday, so we were on the lookout for it, and we knew where it had been seen in a tangle of brush along the north side of the creek. We got brief views of a gray bird with a black cap, about the size of a California Towhee. Its tail was long, and the bird flew from one side of a bunch of dead sticks to another, then hid itself. Having seen Gray Catbird numerous times on visits to MT, I was confident of the i.d. of this species. However, had we not been warned of its location prior to seeing it, we would never have had even this fleeting a glimpse."

Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Curtis Marantz
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49689972
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "This was a relatively small passerine that was roughly comparable in size to a towhee but seemingly slimmer overall. The short bill tapered little throughout its length from a base of medium-depth to a blunt tip along a culmen that was straight almost to the tip of the bill. I further thought the bill would have extended backward on the face to a point near the rear edge of the auriculars. Typical of this species, the forehead was weakly sloping and the crown was gently rounded on a head of unremarkable size. The neck was short and inconspicuous, and the body was slim and with a posture that was closer to horizontal than diagonal. The wings were short and rounded, with wingtips that appeared to reach right about to the tips of the uppertail coverts, and a primary projection that appeared to be less than a third the length of the exposed secondaries (though the feathers in the wingtips were misarranged when I saw them best, which complicated this assessment somewhat). I thought the tail was about as long as the head and body combined, and I noted that it was often flared somewhat and with a rounded tip when flared as such. The legs were unremarkable in both their length and mass for a bird of this size that spends moderate amounts of time on the ground (i.e., probably not all that different from a towhee in both respects).
This bird a generally dark bird with the plumage dominate by slate-gray. I was not quite sure if the black cap reached the base of the bill narrowly on the immediate forehead, but if not, it came close to doing so despite being pinched off to a point at its leading edge. The cap was uniformly black from the forehead back through the crown to the nape and seemingly at least a short way down the back of the neck. The outer edge of the cap was sharply demarcated along the upper edge of the superciliary region, but the rear terminus on the back of the neck appeared to be more diffuse. The sides of the head were uniformly slate-gray from the lores and supraloral region back through the superciliary and auricular regions, and down across the moustachial, submoustachial, and malar regions, which resulted in a plain-faced appearance. I also thought the back and sides of the neck, along with the breast, sides, belly, and flanks were this same shade of slate-gray and wholly unmarked. I was not sure if this bird had a paler throat, but I never specifically noted one in the field. What I could see was a contrast between the slate-gray belly and the dark, rufous-chestnut undertail-coverts. The underside of the tail appeared to be black. I was unable to determine if the outer rectrices were tipped paler, but I did not see them very well.
Returning to the upperparts, the back and scapulars appeared to be similar in color of the face, neck, and underparts. The wings contrasted as generally darker than the body, and even though I failed to notice the finer details of the pattern on the median coverts, I did note that the greater coverts had blackish centers that contrasted with narrow but well-defined fringes that were the same slate-gray as the back. The remiges were similarly patterned, with the inner secondaries contrasting black inner-webs with slate-gray on the outer webs. The remaining remiges also had black centers that contrasted with relatively narrow but again well-defined edges of slate gray that created a conspicuously striped pattern to the rear part of the wing; however, the exposed primary tips appeared to be rather uniformly blackish. I likewise thought the upperside of the tail was quite blackish and without obvious pattern.
The bill, legs, and feet were dull black, and the eyes were dark enough as to often appear black, but I did think they had brown tones when seen in good light."

Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Tom Edell
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49688936
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "continuing bird first reported on 3 Nov. Was seen mostly along the creek today, but also flew into the campground (Photo)"

Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Curtis Marantz
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49689972
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "I believe it was Dave who initially spotted the Sage Thrasher perched atop some dead branches on the north side of the creek opposite the campground. I looked at this bird briefly to identify it with confidence and I tried to get a photo or two before it flew off to the northeast toward the highway, where we saw it briefly as it perched atop a shrub at great distance and then as it vanished. I never heard this bird call and my views were from behind and not very good, but I did note several key characters of the species.
This was a relatively small passerine that seemed similar in size and overall shape to the catbird that we saw repeatedly over the course of our visit. My views of the bill were not very good on a bird that was typically see as it faced away from me, but I did think it was similar in mass to that of the catbird but maybe a little longer and slightly decurved. I thought the forehead was weakly sloping and the crown gently rounded on a head that appeared similar to the catbird in its proportion to the body, and in general, I thought the neck and body were similarly shaped in these two species. The tail may have been even longer than that of the catbird and it appeared square-tipped. I am not sure I ever saw the legs or feet clearly.
Given that my views of this bird were from behind, I saw the upperparts far better than the underparts. The crown, nape, back, and scapulars all appeared to be a sandy-brown in color and without obvious markings. The wings were dark brown, but I did notice what appeared to be at least one, whitish wingbar that was produced by whitish tips to greater coverts that had dark brown centers and seemingly also light brown edges to produce a set of stripes between the wingbars. I also thought the remiges had paler edges to create a striped pattern on the rear part of the wing, but the finer details of this pattern eluded me. I also noted that the tail was generally dark brown, but I was unable to discern any pattern and even if the corners were paler. Given that I saw this bird mostly from behind, I noted only that the flanks were a creamy-whitish in color and seemingly with at least a few dark streaks, but I never saw the throat, breast, or belly, and even my views of the flanks were quite limited.
I thought the bill was gray and I noted that the eyes were pale, seemingly either yellowish to cream-colored, but I cannot now recall any more detail than this about the soft-part colors."

Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Tom Edell
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49688936
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "seen across Gaviota Creek from the campground. Photo"

Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Tom Edell
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49688936
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "heard and then spotted across Gaviota Creek from the campground. Photo"

Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Curtis Marantz
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49689972
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "I believe it was Dave who initially spotted this bird perched atop dead branches in very nearly the same place where we had earlier seen the Sage Thrasher, and like the thrasher, this bird flew off to the northeast and disappeared. We later heard one or two clear, “seep” calls but we never did relocate the sparrow and we could not be sure if it gave these calls. I studied this bird only briefly from behind and even thought it did turn around before flying off, I was trying unsuccessfully to get a photo when it faced is, so I never saw it at all well at this time. I suspect my photo shows more detail than I can remember from the field, and I would not be surprised if others managed to get better photos of this bird than did I.
This bird was conspicuously smaller than the White-crowned Sparrows that we had been seeing, but its shape was typical of a sparrow. I noted that it had a small, conical bill, a strongly rounded crown on a head of unremarkable size, and short and inconspicuous neck, and a plump body, but I failed altogether to note the primary projection or the lengths of either the wings or tail.
This appeared to be a relatively colorful and well-marked bird that had a dark brown crown that was demarcated below by a cream to light-buff supercilium, brown auriculars that were framed by dark brown, a whitish submoustachial-stripe, a dark malar&#61;stripe, and pale lores that lacked a dark eyeline. I also noted a gray band on the side of the neck, and a light brown back that was boldly streaked with black. I did not notice a string contrast between the wings and the upperparts, but I did think there were two whitish wingbars and striping on both the coverts and remiges, but I did not see any more detail than this on the wings and I saw even less on the tail. About all I could say of the underparts was that they were pale, unmarked, and maybe buffy in color on either the breast or sides but more whitish on the belly.
I further thought the eyes were dark and that there was some pinkish or flesh color to the bill, but I cannot remember anything more about the soft-part colors."

Harris's Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) (1)
- Reported Nov 05, 2018 06:09 by John Callender
- Lake Los Carneros Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.44322,-119.84975&ll=34.44322,-119.84975
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49694504
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing first-year bird associating with White-crowned Sparrows at the southeast corner of the lake, near the eastern end of the dam. Large, long-tailed sparrow. Bold streaking on back, white wing-bars, pink bill, pale brown face, extensive bright white on sides of breast and onto belly, black bib."

Harris's Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 12:41 by Jasen Liu
- Lake Los Carneros Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.44322,-119.84975&ll=34.44322,-119.84975
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49690081
- Comments: "Continuing by dam, foraging alone. Large Zonotrichia with buffy head, white underside, black bib extending down breast, very long-tailed impression"

Harris's Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 07:34 by Mark Holmgren
- Lake Los Carneros Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.44322,-119.84975&ll=34.44322,-119.84975
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49677794
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "With White-crowned Sparrows at 34.44032 -119.84798. A broad-headed, long tailed, droopy-winged, large brown sparrow. Large pink bill. Necklace of black dripping down center of breast across a white chest. Brown streaks along sides."

Harris's Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 07:34 by Marissa DeVille
- Lake Los Carneros Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.44322,-119.84975&ll=34.44322,-119.84975
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49688554
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "With White-crowned Sparrows at 34.44032 -119.84798. A broad-headed, long tailed, droopy-winged, large brown sparrow. Large pink bill. Necklace of black dripping down center of breast across a white chest. Brown streaks along sides."

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Tom Edell
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49688936
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "female plumaged bird along Gaviota Creek (Photo)"

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Curtis Marantz
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49689972
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "I am not sure if it was Nick or Dave who initially spotted a female-plumaged redstart foraging actively in the low vegetation along the creek immediately north of the campground. Although this bird was difficult to miss early in the morning, it seemed to vanish when the light was good for photos. I never heard this bird vocalize, but I did study it and take several mediocre photos.
This was a small, slim warbler with a long tail that it often held fanned and cocked upward with the wings held down at the sides. I noted a short, slim bill that tapered to a pointed tip, a small head with a rounded crown, a neck that was short and relatively inconspicuous, a plump body, medium-length wings, and a relatively long tail that was about as long as the head and body combined and rounded at the tip when flared.
The plumage was generally dull apart from the bright yellow markings at the sides, on the wings, and in the tail. The head was medium-gray with at most a weak suggestion of a partial eyering below the eye. The back contrasted as darker and maybe also browner than the cap, and the wings were generally quite dark and brownish. Obvious on the wings was a well-defined band of yellow across what I suspect was the bases of the secondaries, but I could not be completely sure it was not instead on the tips of the greater coverts. The exposed primary tips and the remiges in general were sooty-brown and unmarked. The tail had large rectangles of lemon-yellow basally on either side, but the distal third or so of the tail was black and the center was dark. The throat, breast, and belly were whitish, but the sides and foreflanks had broad patches of what appeared to be yellow as opposed to orange, and I saw no black markings on the breast or sides.
I thought the bill, eyes, legs, and feet were all quite dark, but the color of each eluded me."

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 15:10 by Aaron Maizlish
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49684771
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Photo later"

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 11:57 by Santiago Lupi
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49678872
- Comments: "In the creek close the to campsite 36"

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 11:05 by Jasen Liu
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49690059
- Comments: "Continuing. Otherwise drab warbler with bright yellow undertail covers, dark-capped appearance, bobbing tail while foraging on ground, light streaking on undersides"

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 09:10 by Joan Lentz
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49682873
- Comments: "Ron Hirst showed us exactly where he'd spotted the Palm Warbler, along the entrance road to the state park west of the campground. There was a fence there, and as soon as we walked over to that location, we saw the Palm Warbler bouncing around in the short grass by the wooden fence. It was a brownish warbler with a pronounced whitish supercilium, and a bright yellow patch on the undertail coverts. Distinctive bobbing behavior."

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Curtis Marantz
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49689972
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "We saw repeatedly and all around the campground either one widely moving or two Palm Warblers, but given the extent to which I saw this bird move, I do suspect only one bird was present. Others apparently had a similar impression the previous day. This bird typically foraged by hopping actively about the ground covering quite a bit of distance even on the ground, but when it was flushed it either flew into the trees or moved to another location. Although this bird was generally quiet, I did hear it give both a dry “chick” call and a “tinkling” flight-call, both of which are typical of this species.
This was a medium-sized warbler with a short and obviously slim bill, a sloping forehead and a gently rounded crown on a head of unremarkable size, a short and inconspicuous neck, a plump body with a posture that was a little more upright than horizontal, medium-length wings, slim legs, and a relatively long tail that seemed to be weakly notched.
The overall coloration was a warm, sandy-brown above and a creamy-buff below, but I did think the crown was a darker brown than the back, and I noted a pale-buff supercilium and a dark eyeline and border to auriculars that were paler internally. The throat and submoustachial region were about the same shade of pale buff as the supercilium, but I cannot now recall if this individual had obvious malar stripes. The underparts were pale buff to cream colored and with some relatively fine streaking of dark brown at least at the sides of the breast. I further thought there was some pale yellow in the center of the belly and that the flanks were buff to sandy-brown. The lemon-yellow undertail-coverts contrasted conspicuously with both the more buffy belly and the black bases to rectrices that had large, white spots distally. Returning to the upperparts, the back was a warm, sandy-brown in color and without obvious markings. The wings were a darker and colder brown with a diffuse wingbar that was produced by buffy tips to the greater coverts, but I did not notice an obvious upper wingbar on this bird. The remiges were also edged with buff to create a striped pattern to the rear part of the wing. I cannot remember seeing the rump and I have little or no recollection of the pattern on the upperside of the tail.
The bill and eyes were dark, and the legs appeared to bel blackish."

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 06:21 by Tom Edell
- Gaviota SP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4727321,-120.228442&ll=34.4727321,-120.228442
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49688936
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing bird first reported on 3 Nov. (Photo)"

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1)
- Reported Nov 04, 2018 07:50 by Gary Byerly
- UCSB North Campus Open Space (formerly Ocean Meadows Golf Course), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.421439,-119.8713662&ll=34.421439,-119.8713662
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49696585
- Comments: "Photos"

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