Date: 6/5/18 7:41 pm
From: Joshua Galpern <jgalpern17...>
Subject: [obol] Re: RFI: Native North American Breeding Range Expansion into Oregon
American white pelican may deserve a spot as well.

On Tue, Jun 5, 2018 at 6:29 PM, Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
wrote:

> *
>
> Mockingbird was first recorded in Oregon a long while ago, perhaps before
> the 50s, but not documented as a breeding bird before the 70s. It is not a
> regular breeding species anywhere in the state. It would probably be
> possible to enumerate all individuals reported in history, that is a few
> hundred , while Black Phoebes and Barred Owls probably number in the 10s of
> thousands. Compared to other species discussed on this thread Northern
> Mockingbird has staged a truly glacial colonization. I find this at least
> as intriguing as the accomplishments of the other colonists.
>
> On Jun 5, 2018, at 6:12 PM, Sally Hill <1sallyhill.9...> wrote:
>
> Maybe also No Mockingird.
>
> Sally Hill
>
>
> On Jun 5, 2018, at 5:42 PM, Alan Contreras <acontrer56...> wrote:
>
> The question of population volume is very different from the question of
> speed of expansion. Kites expanded pretty quickly in the 1970s-80s but
> there are few of them, unlike Anna’s or Barred Owls.
>
>
> Alan Contreras
> <acontrer56...>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
> On Jun 5, 2018, at 5:40 PM, David Irons <llsdirons...> wrote:
>
> I think Anna’s Hummingbird has to be the winner here. They now tally
> hundreds on the Victoria, B.C. Christmas Bird Count and have for some time.
> If Barred Owl weren’t nocturnal and we could better appreciate their
> density it would likely be the runner-up. Both of these species far outpace
> Black Phoebe in terms if both geographic distribution and numbers in
> Oregon.
>
> Dave Irons
> Beaverton, OR
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jun 5, 2018, at 5:28 PM, Alan Contreras <acontrer56...> wrote:
>
> I think we’re only looking at native North American species that breed in
> Oregon now.
>
>
> Alan Contreras
> <acontrer56...>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jun 5, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Tom Crabtree <tc...> wrote:
>
> I would add Lesser Goldfinch and Great-tailed Grackle. Starling if you go
> back to the 50s. Euro-trash Doves probably exceed everything but the
> latter.
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
> *From:* <obol-bounce...> [mailto:<obol-bounce...>
> <obol-bounce...>] *On Behalf Of *Alan Contreras
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 05, 2018 5:03 PM
> *To:* <billstinj...>
> *Cc:* <obol...>
> *Subject:* [obol] Re: RFI: Native North American Breeding Range Expansion
> into Oregon
>
> Others to consider are RS Hawk and Anna’s Hummingbird, for which there is
> good data. Older examples include cowbird and maybe House Finch (I don’t
> have that info with me).
>
>
> Alan Contreras
> <acontrer56...>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jun 5, 2018, at 4:46 PM, James Billstine <billstinj...> wrote:
>
> Quick Question:
>
> Would you say that Black Phoebes as a native North American species have
> had the fastest breeding range expansion into Oregon? The only other one I
> can think of is Barred Owl. Any more off the top of your head?
>
>
>
> --
> James Billstine
>
> http://wingsaroundtheumpqua.blogspot.com/
>
>
>
>
>

 
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