Date: 3/27/18 4:22 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
I agree. However, *inland,* the Ring-billed Gull is still, by far, the
most numerous gull species in the state. This is especially true in the
Piedmont, where I live.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Mar 27, 2018 at 6:10 PM, Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
wrote:

> Harry,
>
> Lesser Black-backs are taking over here in the 21st Century.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras, NC
>
> On Mar 27, 2018, at 12:34 PM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Ricky did e-mail me and said there were about 110 Ring-billed Gulls at
> Buckhorn. Makes me feel better! Still, as he said: "I have not heard any
> sighting where Lessers outnumbered Ring-billeds 3 to 1!"
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> On Tue, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:07 AM, Christopher Hill <Chill...>
> wrote:
>
>> I don’t necessarily agree about the ring-bills - even a couple weeks ago
>> the thousands of adult Ring-bills had left the landfill at Conway, SC,
>> leaving only a scant couple hundred straggling immatures. And this week I
>> have seen internet photos of Ring-bills at their nesting colonies in the
>> great lakes.
>>
>> There is a window in spring when the large white-headed gulls greatly
>> outnumber the Ring-bills. Weird, but it does happen.
>>
>> Chris Hill
>> Conway, SC
>>
>> > On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:48 AM, Harry E. LeGrand Jr <
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> > A total of 321 gulls and nary a RIng-billed Gull? Anywhere else
>> inland, a group of that many gulls would nearly all be RBG -- like at Lake
>> Crabtree. Must have been some Ring-billeds that you simply didn't mention
>> in your posting.
>> >
>> > Harry LeGrand
>> > Raleigh
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPhone
>> >
>> >> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:22 AM, Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Stopped by Buckhorn Reservoir in Wilson County at sunrise this
>> >> morning. From the boat ramp, was able to count the gulls sitting on
>> >> the water. There were two main rafts of birds with both being made up
>> >> of all Lesser Black-backeds! There were only a couple of handfuls of
>> >> Herring Gulls mixed in with them. I counted 307 Lessers and 14
>> >> Herrings. All age classes were present, and some of the adults were in
>> >> fine plumage with clean heads and bright bills. Quite a few of the
>> >> adults were very dark backed. Within thirty minutes the birds started
>> >> flying around and by 8:00 they had dispersed and only 20-30 were left
>> >> over the lake. This must have been some kind of staging before moving
>> >> on. I do not remember ever seeing anything quite like this with
>> >> Lessers. An amazing total for anywhere in NC, especially inland!
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> Ricky Davis
>> >> Rocky Mount, NC
>>
>>
>
>

 
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