Date: 2/6/18 8:49 am
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
Well, I have learned something new, and Keith and Aaron, please disregard my latest ebird list for review. I will remove that incidental sighting.
Happy Birding,
David

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 6, 2018, at 10:55 AM, Keith McCullough <flatpickit...> wrote:
>
> I agree that it is much more likely that this pigment came from its diet. This article from last year has more:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.nationalgeographic.com_2016_10_birds-2Dchange-2Dcolors-2Dflickers-2Dhoneysuckles_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=09DnK0vtkYGQMU_cm82SLt__wlqWuW82zmgXTNIPpuI&s=iX_3-XPe7S5VyikdgEAoDQlvVxZCxOlI1D9AxUZ70Hw&e=
>
> Keith McCullough
> Charleston, SC
>
>
>> On Feb 6, 2018, at 10:27 AM, <kde...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I will point out that the color of underwings and tail are not reliable
>> field marks for distinguishing the two forms as otherwise "normal" eastern
>> "Yellow-shafted" Flickers can have orange to reddish-orange color here.
>> The key is to look at head pattern.
>>
>> In fact, I saw one in my neighborhood in Knoxville, TN just this morning
>> with bright reddish orange where it should be yellow but with normal head
>> pattern for a female "yellow-shafted". I think last I read, this is
>> believed to be related to diet similar to the orange tips on some waxwing
>> tails and yellow or orange House Finches.
>>
>> For what it's worth, I recently spent just over a year living in central
>> WA where it seems a lot of the easter/western pairs come to meet. I have
>> photos of red- and yellow-shafted flickers in the same tree, and there's a
>> LOT of cross-breeding and integrades between the two forms. Head pattern
>> is the key to look for.
>>
>> Dean Edwards
>> Knoxville, TN
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Tue, 6 Feb 2018, Steve Compton wrote:
>>>
>>> David,
>>>
>>> Yes, I would note this subspecies in any eBird report or any other reporting. In my 39 years of birding in SC I don't recall ever seeing one. I have seen a lot of them out west and they are dramatically different. As you may know, they were once separate species. Maybe they will go the way of the "Northern Oriole" and be separated again one day.
>>>
>>> Steve Compton
>>> Greenville, SC
>>>
>>> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
>>>> On 6 Feb 2018 9:39 am, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi Folks,
>>>> I'm not sure if this is note-worthy or not. It just happens to be the first time I've noticed this subspecies here in SC. Anyway, I was driving to work and saw a Flicker fly up from the roadside and fly about 100yards to a nearby group of trees. It was clearly a flicker with undulating flight and bright white rump. But what stood out as unusual was the color of the underwings. Bright orange-red. Reminiscent of the underside of a Ground Dove.
>>>> I did not see the malar Stripe or other facial features to help cinch the ID, but thought you would all like to know.
>>>> Here is where I saw it...
>>>>
>>>> 32?38'49.4"N 80?07'51.3"W
>>>>
>>>> Happy Birding,
>>>> David
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone

 
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