Date: 2/2/18 1:12 pm
From: Williams, Lisa <liswilliam...>
Subject: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks (9)
Hackberry Source - Go Native Tree Farm
2310 Chestnut View Dr
Lancaster, PA 17603
Phone: 717-399-0195
www.gonativetrees.com

I have bought other species from this farm and found them to perform well. No direct experience with their hackberry. In 2017, they offered 3 varieties.

Lisa M. Williams, Wildlife Biologist - Grouse, Woodcock, Mourning Doves
PA Game Commission
<liswilliam...>
Grouse and Woodcock Mgt: http://www.pgc.pa.gov/Wildlife/WildlifeSpecies/Pages/RuffedGrouse.aspx

It is OK to print this e-mail. Paper is a renewable, recyclable, and biodegradable product made from trees. Well-managed forests are good for the environment - providing wildlife habitat for dozens of species and communities that require young forests.


-----Original Message-----
From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania [mailto:<PABIRDS...>] On Behalf Of PABIRDS automatic digest system
Sent: Friday, February 2, 2018 12:00 AM
To: <PABIRDS...>
Subject: PABIRDS Digest - 31 Jan 2018 to 1 Feb 2018 (#2018-33)

There are 12 messages totaling 568 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks (9)
2. Turkey Vulture - Allegheny County
3. sources for hackberry CELTIS OCCIDENTALIS
4. Lancaster Co. Bird Club presents Dan Mummert of PGC on Thursday, 2/8/18

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 06:07:36 -0500
From: "Josh D." <jd425...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

Interesting that several of you should mention Common/Northern Hackberry. I've recently decided on one to replace a lost Ash tree. Any ideas where to find good large nursery stock? I contacted Musser Forests (Indiana, PA) and haven't heard back from them about Hackberry.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 06:28:31 -0500
From: Josh Donaldson <jd425...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

Should have mentioned I am in Franklin County, sorry. I tried one garden center here they didn't have Hackberry and didn't know where to get one. Seems like an excellent tree for many birds, its native and grows fast too.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 13:29:44 +0000
From: "Gross, Douglas" <dogross...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

Hi Marcy,
I do not propagate Northern Hackberry or know much about its growth. Hackberry grows best in rich bottomland forests but also will grow on hillsides. Each tree has flowers of both sexes. But, I would bet that it is better for multiple trees to be planted at a location to mix with the usual silver maples & sycamores of these woods.
I’ve seen many hackberry trees in woods along the Susquehanna river including places like Bloomsburg town park, the Berwick brewery (which overlooks the river), Susquehanna Riverlands, and along the Susquehanna Warrior Trail in Luzerne County. I am sure that they grow at many locations along the main branch of the Susquehanna and along other streams in the state as well as parks and game lands. They must be common on islands, too. Birds distribute the seeds through their digestive tract so seedlings grown in a lot of places that might not be optimum for growth.
Yes, I have seen hackberry emperors in Susquehanna Riverlands.
When I have led bird walks, I’ve often been the only person on the walk who knew what this species was and that it was a good wildlife plant. That’s why I’ve chimed in. It is good for birders to be better botanists.

I also like the cucumber magnolia tree or cucumber-tree (Magnolia acuminata) that can grow pretty large and produces odd sausage-shaped green fruits that wood ducks and other birds consume.

Doug Gross
Columbia County

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 10:01:32 -0500
From: Marcy Cunkelman <plant4nature...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

The reason I got a hackberry tree was because I had both of the emperors here before I had a tree. Need to see if I can find some down over the hill. I am not familiar with this tree.

Another tree the birds have been munching on is the tulip tree and the candles. That tree grows very easily and the seeds seem to fly far from the tree.

Birds, butterflies and pollinators all love the habit improvement. Now to get some paw paws growing for me and the zebra butterflies, I will have another host plant.

And we do have the cucumber magnolia at driveway edge and in our little patch of woods.

Thinking spring!!!

Marcy Cunkelman, Indiana co

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 1, 2018, at 8:29 AM, Gross, Douglas <dogross...> wrote:
>
> Hi Marcy,
> I do not propagate Northern Hackberry or know much about its growth. Hackberry grows best in rich bottomland forests but also will grow on hillsides. Each tree has flowers of both sexes. But, I would bet that it is better for multiple trees to be planted at a location to mix with the usual silver maples & sycamores of these woods.
> I’ve seen many hackberry trees in woods along the Susquehanna river including places like Bloomsburg town park, the Berwick brewery (which overlooks the river), Susquehanna Riverlands, and along the Susquehanna Warrior Trail in Luzerne County. I am sure that they grow at many locations along the main branch of the Susquehanna and along other streams in the state as well as parks and game lands. They must be common on islands, too. Birds distribute the seeds through their digestive tract so seedlings grown in a lot of places that might not be optimum for growth.
> Yes, I have seen hackberry emperors in Susquehanna Riverlands.
> When I have led bird walks, I’ve often been the only person on the walk who knew what this species was and that it was a good wildlife plant. That’s why I’ve chimed in. It is good for birders to be better botanists.
>
> I also like the cucumber magnolia tree or cucumber-tree (Magnolia acuminata) that can grow pretty large and produces odd sausage-shaped green fruits that wood ducks and other birds consume.
>
> Doug Gross
> Columbia County
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 10:24:15 -0500
From: Rob Blye <rwblye...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

I agree with Doug that birders and wildlife enthusiasts should also learn their plants. If nothing else, it helps to point out birds in the forest.
"Look in the top of that white oak to see the cerulean warbler".

I observed hackberry frequently on the floodplain of the mighty Schuylkill River when I lived there. I too tasted the berries and they are sweet.

*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

On Thu, Feb 1, 2018 at 10:01 AM, Marcy Cunkelman <plant4nature...>
wrote:

> The reason I got a hackberry tree was because I had both of the
> emperors here before I had a tree. Need to see if I can find some down
> over the hill. I am not familiar with this tree.
>
> Another tree the birds have been munching on is the tulip tree and the
> candles. That tree grows very easily and the seeds seem to fly far from
> the tree.
>
> Birds, butterflies and pollinators all love the habit improvement.
> Now to get some paw paws growing for me and the zebra butterflies, I
> will have another host plant.
>
> And we do have the cucumber magnolia at driveway edge and in our
> little patch of woods.
>
> Thinking spring!!!
>
> Marcy Cunkelman, Indiana co
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Feb 1, 2018, at 8:29 AM, Gross, Douglas <dogross...> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Marcy,
> > I do not propagate Northern Hackberry or know much about its growth.
> Hackberry grows best in rich bottomland forests but also will grow on
> hillsides. Each tree has flowers of both sexes. But, I would bet
> that it is better for multiple trees to be planted at a location to
> mix with the usual silver maples & sycamores of these woods.
> > I’ve seen many hackberry trees in woods along the Susquehanna river
> including places like Bloomsburg town park, the Berwick brewery (which
> overlooks the river), Susquehanna Riverlands, and along the
> Susquehanna Warrior Trail in Luzerne County. I am sure that they grow
> at many locations along the main branch of the Susquehanna and along
> other streams in the state as well as parks and game lands. They must
> be common on islands, too. Birds distribute the seeds through their
> digestive tract so seedlings grown in a lot of places that might not be optimum for growth.
> > Yes, I have seen hackberry emperors in Susquehanna Riverlands.
> > When I have led bird walks, I’ve often been the only person on the
> > walk
> who knew what this species was and that it was a good wildlife plant.
> That’s why I’ve chimed in. It is good for birders to be better botanists.
> >
> > I also like the cucumber magnolia tree or cucumber-tree (Magnolia
> acuminata) that can grow pretty large and produces odd sausage-shaped
> green fruits that wood ducks and other birds consume.
> >
> > Doug Gross
> > Columbia County
> >
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 16:09:51 +0000
From: DAVID KOCH <davilene...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

I live just 2 miles west of the Delaware River, about halfway up the eastern edge of the state. There are hackberry trees in the fencerows on our farm and at places in the woods. There's a relatively big one at the end of our driveway that I can see from my living room window and it gets a lot of activity. Robins, woodpeckers, waxwings, mockingbirds, bluebirds, etc., all use it. But it can be difficult identifying young hackberry trees because their bark looks different when they're young than it often does in mature specimens. Sibley's "Guide to Trees" has good depictions of that.
 Arlene Koch Easton, PA Northampton County <davilene...>

On Thursday, February 1, 2018 10:24 AM, Rob Blye <rwblye...> wrote:


I agree with Doug that birders and wildlife enthusiasts should also learn their plants. If nothing else, it helps to point out birds in the forest.
"Look in the top of that white oak to see the cerulean warbler".

I observed hackberry frequently on the floodplain of the mighty Schuylkill River when I lived there. I too tasted the berries and they are sweet.

*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

On Thu, Feb 1, 2018 at 10:01 AM, Marcy Cunkelman <plant4nature...>
wrote:

> The reason I got a hackberry tree was because I had both of the
> emperors here before I had a tree. Need to see if I can find some down
> over the hill. I am not familiar with this tree.
>
> Another tree the birds have been munching on is the tulip tree and the
> candles.  That tree grows very easily and the seeds seem to fly far
> from the tree.
>
> Birds, butterflies and pollinators all love the habit improvement. 
> Now to get some paw paws growing for me and the zebra butterflies, I
> will have another host plant.
>
>  And we do have the cucumber magnolia at driveway edge and  in our
>little patch of woods.
>
> Thinking spring!!!
>
> Marcy Cunkelman, Indiana co
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Feb 1, 2018, at 8:29 AM, Gross, Douglas <dogross...> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Marcy,
> > I do not propagate Northern Hackberry or know much about its growth.
> Hackberry grows best in rich bottomland forests but also will grow on
> hillsides.  Each tree has flowers of both sexes.  But, I would bet
> that it is better for multiple trees to be planted at a location to
> mix with the usual silver maples & sycamores of these woods.
> > I’ve seen many hackberry trees in woods along the Susquehanna river
> including places like Bloomsburg town park, the Berwick brewery (which
> overlooks the river), Susquehanna Riverlands, and along the
> Susquehanna Warrior Trail in Luzerne County.  I am sure that they grow
> at many locations along the main branch of the Susquehanna and along
> other streams in the state as well as parks and game lands. They must
> be common on islands, too. Birds distribute the seeds through their
> digestive tract so seedlings grown in a lot of places that might not be optimum for growth.
> > Yes, I  have seen hackberry emperors in Susquehanna Riverlands.
> > When I have led bird walks, I’ve often been the only person on the
> > walk
> who knew what this species was and that it was a good wildlife plant.
> That’s why I’ve chimed in.  It is good for birders to be better botanists.
> >
> > I also like the cucumber magnolia tree or cucumber-tree (Magnolia
> acuminata) that can grow pretty large and produces odd sausage-shaped
> green fruits that wood ducks and other birds consume.
> >
> > Doug Gross
> > Columbia County
> >
>



------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 11:15:41 -0500
From: "<kvanfleet...>" <kvanfleet...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

To add to the conversation the following is copied off the National Arbor Day Foundation website for your reading pleasure.

HACKBERRY (/CELTIS OCCIDENTALIS/)

The hackberry, while often forgotten by casual consumers, is commonly heralded by tree experts as “one tough tree.” Found on a wide range of soils east of the Rockies from southern Canada to Florida, these trees thrive in a broad span of temperatures and on sites that vary from 14 to 60" of annual rainfall. They can even stand up to strong winds and tolerate air pollution.
All of this hardiness adds up to a good landscape choice, particularly if you’re looking for an energy-conserving shade tree that doesn’t require watering.

HARDINESS ZONES
The hackberry can be expected to grow in Hardiness Zones 3–9.

TREE TYPE
This tree is considered both a shade tree and an ornamental tree. It features a spreading canopy capable of blocking sunlight and adds visual interest and beauty to landscaping.

MATURE SIZE
The hackberry grows to a height of 40–60' and a spread of 40–60' at maturity.

GROWTH RATE
This tree grows at a medium to fast rate, with height increases of anywhere from 13" to more than 24" per year.

SUN PREFERENCE
Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree, meaning it should get at least six hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day.

SOIL PREFERENCE
The hackberry grows well in acidic, alkaline, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well-drained, wet and clay soils. It has some tolerance for both flooding and drought.

ATTRIBUTES
This tree:
• Features leaves shaped like spearheads, approximately 2–4" and 1½–2" wide, arranged alternately along the twigs. Small teeth edge at least the upper half of the leaf.
• Produces small, dark red drupes about 1/3" in diameter that turn dark purple as they mature in mid-autumn. These berry-like fruit persist into the winter.
• Develops a broad crown with arching branches.
• Forms characteristic corky ridges and warts on trunk and branches.
• Tolerates strong winds, pollution, heat, drought and salt.
• Grows in a rounded, vase-like shape.
• Has a growth pattern that resembles the elm--without the susceptibility to disease.
•
WILDLIFE VALUE
The fruit of the hackberry is popular with winter birds, especially the cedar waxwing, mockingbird and robin. The tree also attracts many butterfly species including American snout, comma, hackberry, mourning cloak, tawny emperor and question mark.
History/Lore
In earlier years, its tough, flexible wood was used for barrel hoops, and many a pioneer cabin was equipped with durable hackberry wood flooring. The tree was first cultivated in 1636.
Other common names given to the hackberry include common hackberry, sugarberry, nettletree, beaverwood, northern hackberry and American hackberry.

Quoting "Gross, Douglas" <dogross...>:

> Hi Marcy,
> I do not propagate Northern Hackberry or know much about its growth.
> Hackberry grows best in rich bottomland forests but also will grow on
> hillsides. Each tree has flowers of both sexes. But, I would bet
> that it is better for multiple trees to be planted at a location to
> mix with the usual silver maples & sycamores of these woods.
> I?ve seen many hackberry trees in woods along the Susquehanna river
> including places like Bloomsburg town park, the Berwick brewery (which
> overlooks the river), Susquehanna Riverlands, and along the
> Susquehanna Warrior Trail in Luzerne County. I am sure that they grow
> at many locations along the main branch of the Susquehanna and along
> other streams in the state as well as parks and game lands.
> They must be common on islands, too. Birds distribute the seeds
> through their digestive tract so seedlings grown in a lot of places
> that might not be optimum for growth.
> Yes, I have seen hackberry emperors in Susquehanna Riverlands.
> When I have led bird walks, I?ve often been the only person on the
> walk who knew what this species was and that it was a good wildlife
> plant. That?s why I?ve chimed in. It is good for birders to be
> better botanists.
>
> I also like the cucumber magnolia tree or cucumber-tree (Magnolia
> acuminata) that can grow pretty large and produces odd sausage-shaped
> green fruits that wood ducks and other birds consume.
>
> Doug Gross
> Columbia County
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 17:05:09 +0000
From: Alan Buriak <a_buriak...>
Subject: Turkey Vulture - Allegheny County

I just drove down Rittman Rd in West Deer Twp along the northern edge of Allegheny County and to my surprise, I found a Turkey Vulture eating roadkill on the road, unexpected for this date. Also right in that area were both a Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawk.

Good birding,
Alan Buriak
Gibsonia, Allegheny County



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 13:40:29 -0500
From: Debra Grim <dsgrim02...>
Subject: sources for hackberry CELTIS OCCIDENTALIS

There has been a lot of discussion on this listserv about hackberry trees and how good they are for birds and butterflies. The Pennsylvania Native Plant Society had these trees for sale last May from these vendors:

Go Native Tree Farm, Lancaster, https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gonativetrees.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=iIemWw%2BVfh%2F%2BbUvxWItm%2BjeLxRjSWBAVZo89zYLLO9Q%3D&reserved=0
Hilltop Hollow Farm, Bellefonte, https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hilltophollowfarm.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=%2FTUzZpyDZirOsE7cf1c%2Fmodzcybkgmyr8mrZIVTnqKg%3D&reserved=0
Winghaven Nursery, Coburn, https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwinghavennursery.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=F4ntQpybks1bGLHte5KLTigN8MLGPi9jC%2FGOk6vGZAs%3D&reserved=0

You can also check our website (https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.panativeplantsociety.org%2F&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=etJMpvUUdE%2FQkYi3RVOmisv7Ycztj%2Bbs3DlBcPo9Imc%3D&reserved=0) soon to see the list of plants for our May 5, 2018 sale, to see if they will be available. You can pre-order and pick them up at the sale.

Debra Grim

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 13:53:45 -0500
From: Nancy Cladel <ncladel...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

The Manada Conservancy has them available through its native plant presale. Trees must be picked up day of sale( April 28). For details go to https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.manada.org&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=N%2Bau5dWHdI1ggAaBCTa5W%2FopGLDuiy4uJggFxtoHGTo%3D&reserved=0 and click on pre-sale. Trees are in two gallon pots.

Nancy Cladel

On Thu, Feb 1, 2018 at 6:07 AM, Josh D. <jd425...> wrote:

> Interesting that several of you should mention Common/Northern Hackberry.
> I've recently decided on one to replace a lost Ash tree. Any ideas where
> to find good large nursery stock? I contacted Musser Forests (Indiana,
> PA) and haven't heard back from them about Hackberry.
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 20:52:16 +0000
From: Ron Rovansek <rrovansek...>
Subject: Re: Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

Cucumber Magnolia is actually pretty common in many parts of PA. It tends to grow in moist ravines with Tulip Poplar and has a bark and overall form similar to Tulip Poplar. I often have to look twice to ID a Cucumber Magnolia because the bark is so similar to Tulip Poplar, and in the tall forests where they both live in can be hard to see the leaves and fruit high overhead.

Ron Rovansek
Centre County

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania [mailto:<PABIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Gross, Douglas
Sent: Thursday, February 1, 2018 5:30 AM
To: <PABIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hackberry Birds: Evening Grosbeaks

Hi Marcy,
I do not propagate Northern Hackberry or know much about its growth. Hackberry grows best in rich bottomland forests but also will grow on hillsides. Each tree has flowers of both sexes. But, I would bet that it is better for multiple trees to be planted at a location to mix with the usual silver maples & sycamores of these woods.
I’ve seen many hackberry trees in woods along the Susquehanna river including places like Bloomsburg town park, the Berwick brewery (which overlooks the river), Susquehanna Riverlands, and along the Susquehanna Warrior Trail in Luzerne County. I am sure that they grow at many locations along the main branch of the Susquehanna and along other streams in the state as well as parks and game lands. They must be common on islands, too. Birds distribute the seeds through their digestive tract so seedlings grown in a lot of places that might not be optimum for growth.
Yes, I have seen hackberry emperors in Susquehanna Riverlands.
When I have led bird walks, I’ve often been the only person on the walk who knew what this species was and that it was a good wildlife plant. That’s why I’ve chimed in. It is good for birders to be better botanists.

I also like the cucumber magnolia tree or cucumber-tree (Magnolia acuminata) that can grow pretty large and produces odd sausage-shaped green fruits that wood ducks and other birds consume.

Doug Gross
Columbia County

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 22:16:25 +0000
From: Bettina Heffner <BettinaHef...>
Subject: Lancaster Co. Bird Club presents Dan Mummert of PGC on Thursday, 2/8/18

The Lancaster County Bird Club will meet Thursday, February 8, 2018 at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Farm and Home Center, 1383 Arcadia Rd., Lancaster, PA.

Dan Mummert from the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) will present a program titled “ PA's Barn Owl Conservation Initiative: What Has Been Learned Over the Past Decade?” He will discuss a number of topics including nesting habits, habitat requirements, conservation issues related to the birds' decline in PA , and how the Initiative has been addressing this decline.

Dan is the PGC's Wildlife Diversity Biologist for southeastern PA. Since 2004, his role has been focused on maintaining the diversity of birds and mammals found throughout our state. He may be surveying caves for bats one day and consulting with landowners on how to enhance their properties for specific birds the next. When not at work, he may be hiking, birding, running, playing the cello or coaching softball.

A short business meeting will precede the program. The public is invited to attend free of charge and may call 717-393-2546 or 717-984-2738 with questions. More information about the club can be found on its website at https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.lancasterbirdclub.org&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=mIs3DoL9YIM2I4rX1c40NNum8s%2BEOU21GxVXulUlJ2M%3D&reserved=0<https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lancasterbirdclub.org%2F&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=LYXfCw5nDDRT02r7ey20%2BYRVOd7Lh1B61mSnp0FAvYg%3D&reserved=0> and on Facebook @ Lancaster Bird Club.




Sent from Mail<https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgo.microsoft.com%2Ffwlink%2F%3FLinkId%3D550986&data=02%7C01%<7Cliswilliam...>%7C19ce1802ad3d4767ee9e08d569f9dc3d%7Ceb95af4b3a2648a583f6f97abed4e1f7%7C1%7C0%7C636531444232267076&sdata=ajdDv0nVE9v9UaIGRq4rQbpSvR9H8fEPHm5Bf6y68Os%3D&reserved=0> for Windows 10

------------------------------

End of PABIRDS Digest - 31 Jan 2018 to 1 Feb 2018 (#2018-33)
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