Date: 1/30/18 9:19 am
From: Nathaniel Wander <nw105...>
Subject: [obol] Historic Ruffed Grouse in Curry
For what it's worth, around the turn of the millennium this species was regular along Elk River Road, just inland from the highway.  Otherwise, I've only seen it in the Blue Mountains
Nathaniel WanderPortland, OR
Max Planck is supposed to have said: A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and        making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die        and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.Andreas Wagner observed of Planck's remark: Science, like nature, advances one funeral at a time.  (Arrival of the Fittest, p.197)

On Monday, January 29, 2018, 10:07:06 PM PST, <obol...> <obol...> wrote:

obol Digest    Monday, January 29 2018    Volume: 07  Issue: 034

In This Issue:
    #1:    From: MARK BALDWIN <mark.baldwin2...>
        Subject: [obol] White-winged Crossbills still present near Florence
    #2:    From: Zia Fukuda <zialeefukuda...>
        Subject: [obol] OBA Photo Contest Voting Reminder:
    #3:    From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Wallowa Co Gyrfalcon
    #4:    From: Joel Geier <joel.geier...>
        Subject: [obol] Pipits in mid-Willamette Valley
    #5:    From: Darrel Whipple <dwhipple...>
        Subject: [obol] Evening Grosbeaks Columbia County
    #6:    From: Philip Kline <pgeorgekline...>
        Subject: [obol] Sauvie Island Tree Sparrow
    #7:    From: Brodie Cass Talbott <brodietlewis...>
        Subject: [obol] Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse
    #8:    From: Nicholas Mrvelj <nickmrvelj...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse
    #9:    From: Brodie Cass Talbott <brodietlewis...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse
    #10:    From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
        Subject: [obol] What was your best bird/milestone of 2017?
    #11:    From: Brodie Cass Talbott <brodietlewis...>
        Subject: [obol] Hmm.. Maybe not: Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse
    #12:    From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
        Subject: [obol] Troutdale Ruffed Grouse(?)
    #13:    From: Megan Cash <mlcash7...>
        Subject: [obol] Duck ID Help
    #14:    From: Jacob Mathison <jacobmathison1...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Duck ID Help
    #15:    From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Duck ID Help
    #16:    From: Torrey G-T <tgagetomlinson...>
        Subject: [obol] Lewis's Woodpecker- Eugene
    #17:    From: ed mcv <ed.mcvicker...>
        Subject: [obol] Mult. Co. Harris's Sparrow
    #18:    From: Harry Fuller <atowhee...>
        Subject: [obol] TV among birds along I-5, Ashland to Salem
    #19:    From: Dave Helzer <davehelzerian...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Wallowa Co Gyrfalcon
    #20:    From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk...>
        Subject: [obol] Coos WW Crossbill 1/28/18
    #21:    From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Duck ID Help
    #22:    From: David Mandell <davidmandell...>
        Subject: [obol] Sandy River Delta & Ruffed Grouse
    #23:    From: <jmeredit...>
        Subject: [obol] Mc Cowns Longspur, Klamath Falls area
    #24:    From: Pamela Johnston <shovzan...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Sandy River Delta & Ruffed Grouse
    #25:    From: "Marcia F. Cutler" <marciafcutler...>
        Subject: [obol] Re: Pipits at Ankeny NWR

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Msg: #1 in digest
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 2018 23:26:59 -0800 (PST)
From: MARK BALDWIN <mark.baldwin2...>
Subject: [obol] White-winged Crossbills still present near Florence

My wife and I were in Florence to attend a presentation of "Living Voices" at the Public Library. Since we were a little early I decided to look for the White-winged Crossbills that had been seen in the vicinity of the pay station on the South Jetty road. It was very noisy with diesel trucks and off-road vehicles so I decided to walk up the trail just to the right of the kiosk. Once I got to the top of that dune I could see the cone laden treetops and before long I heard and then saw a flock of Red Crossbills. I thought I saw white wing bars on one bird but wasn't sure until I reviewed my poor photos. Thanks to Pam Otley for pointing me in the right direction!

Happy Birding,

Mark


------------------------------

Msg: #2 in digest
From: Zia Fukuda <zialeefukuda...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 07:35:32 -0800
Subject: [obol] OBA Photo Contest Voting Reminder:

Hello all,
Just a quick reminder that you still have time to vote in the January OBA
Photo Contest - you have until the end of the month to try to decide on
which photo you like best (an almost impossible task!)
Check out all of the amazing submissions (and vote!) here:
http://www.orbirds.org/contestwithvotingpanel.html


Cheers,
Zia Fukuda



------------------------------

Msg: #3 in digest
From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Wallowa Co Gyrfalcon
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 07:56:18 -0800

Unless someone has specific information from eBird regarding the
gyrfalcon/falcon-trade connection, I think we're making an assumption
that may not be entirely valid regarding the placement of Gyrfalcon
on the blocked list.

If we look at the other species that have been blocked, they appear
to be species sensitive to human disturbance in general and subject to
too much love from birders and photographers.  Perhaps we are deflecting
when we should be looking at behaviors closer to home.  The problems
associated with disturbances caused by people who want to get a better
look or a better photograph are well documented and the multiply in
areas where human population densities are high and wild spaces are
low.  It would not be the first time that an issue associated with
urban populations is handled asymmetrically by eBird.  I have referred
to it as the East Coast bias, but it could just as easily be labeled the
Southern California Bias or the Portland bias.

This does not dilute from  the larger problem with eBird's solution to
the disturbance issue.  They've used a chainsaw when a scalpel would
have been more appropriate and I hope the folks at eBird are listening
to the very real concern many of us have about the suppression of data
we are choosing to donate to them.


--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
That question...
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=3294

------------------------------

Msg: #4 in digest
Subject: [obol] Pipits in mid-Willamette Valley
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 07:59:45 -0800

Hi all,

I notice there was plenty of discussion following Pepper Trail's posting
on OBOL yesterday, regarding the frequency of large flock of American
Pipits in the Willamette Valley.

The Airlie-Albany CBC on December 31st recorded a total of 556 pipits,
including 145 in the sector that includes the SW part of Ankeny NWR
where Pepper noted a flock of 75.

On the other side of the Willamette River near the small town of Buena
Vista, I recorded a single flock of 180, mostly by luck as I happened to
be turning around at the north edge of my sector, just as they decided
to fly from one part of a fescue field to another.

I'd guess that we missed far more pipits than we found, as they're
nearly invisible from the road when they're feeding out in grass fields.
There could easily be 5000 to 10,000 pipits in the Airlie-Albany CBC
circle. They're one of the most abundant wintering songbirds in open
fields of this area, right behind starlings, blackbirds, and robins.

Pipits are always cool to see, whether in their high alpine or Arctic
tundra nesting situations, or here in agricultural fields. Wet weather
can be a good time to look for them as they tend to congregate around
the edges of water that spills out of overflowing ditches, floating up
all kinds of good things to eat. In older bird guides they were called
"Water Pipits" (before American Pipit was split off as a separate
species from their Eurasian relatives), which is a good clue to their
foraging habits.

In fall shortly after wintering pipit flocks arrive, and again in early
spring (late February/early March) as they're starting to get restless,
you can sometimes see flocks perching on wires and small trees along
fencelines, or up on utility wires.

Happy pipit-watching,
Joel


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




------------------------------

Msg: #5 in digest
From: Darrel Whipple <dwhipple...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 12:17:42 -0800
Subject: [obol] Evening Grosbeaks Columbia County

I have had 20-24 Evening Grosbeaks at my feeders since the first week of January.

Darrel Whipple
Rainier, Oregon
------------------------------

Msg: #6 in digest
From: Philip Kline <pgeorgekline...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 13:34:41 -0800
Subject: [obol] Sauvie Island Tree Sparrow

I found an American Tree Sparrow along Rentenaar Road this morning.  It was
on the left about 2/3 of the way down just past where the road crosses a
large slough. It was associating with a large mixed sparrow flock that also
contained at least 4 white-throateds.  A swamp sparrow was by a small
pullout on the south side of the road about 200 yards down.  A Marsh Wren
was calling from the same spot.  I ended up seeing 11 sparrow species.
Other highlights were a gorgeous adult red-shouldered hawk and seeing the
sky fill with about 2000 snow geese.  Link to checklist with lousy tree
sparrow photo below:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42344667

Good birding,

Philip Kline



------------------------------

Msg: #7 in digest
From: Brodie Cass Talbott <brodietlewis...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 14:14:32 -0800
Subject: [obol] Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse

Howdy,
The Company Lake Harris's Sparrow was present again today around noon.

Another bird of note was a calling Ruffed Grouse in the woods less than 10
meters from the Sparrow feeding station.  The call was what is described in
the Sibley app as the female alarm call. It started very rapid fire, as
I've heard before on Mt. Hood, then slowed to sporadic notes. Only then,
and in between the planes landing at the airport, was I able to get a
recording. Feel free to let me know if you hear something different:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42348096

Looking at the ebird maps, it appears they're reasonably common along the
Sandy River area, and there's one record on the other side of the Sandy
from Company Lake, but this appears to be as far West as they have made it
towards Portland's east metro area.

There's still a good amount of seed on the ground, so someone may be able
to get a view of it if there's a decent break in the dogs.

Good birding,
Brodie
Portland



------------------------------

Msg: #8 in digest
From: Nicholas Mrvelj <nickmrvelj...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 22:39:59 +0000
Subject: [obol] Re: Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse

Hey Brodie,
In the recording, I have a hard time hearing the vocalizations I believe
you are referring to. Besides the Hairy Woodpecker calling loudly, I hear
what kind of sounds like a Bewick's Wren. I'm assuming the volume is too
low to pick up what you were hearing. Have you considered California Quail,
which can be occasionally found in that general vicinty? It seems unlikely
Ruffed Grouse would be in that area, but you never know. I've only had luck
with them in higher elevations in Multnomah County and I am far from
experienced with the species.

Best,
-Nick

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 2:15 PM Brodie Cass Talbott <brodietlewis...>
wrote:

> Howdy,
>
> The Company Lake Harris's Sparrow was present again today around noon.
>
> Another bird of note was a calling Ruffed Grouse in the woods less than 10
> meters from the Sparrow feeding station.  The call was what is described in
> the Sibley app as the female alarm call. It started very rapid fire, as
> I've heard before on Mt. Hood, then slowed to sporadic notes. Only then,
> and in between the planes landing at the airport, was I able to get a
> recording. Feel free to let me know if you hear something different:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42348096
>
> Looking at the ebird maps, it appears they're reasonably common along the
> Sandy River area, and there's one record on the other side of the Sandy
> from Company Lake, but this appears to be as far West as they have made it
> towards Portland's east metro area.
>
> There's still a good amount of seed on the ground, so someone may be able
> to get a view of it if there's a decent break in the dogs.
>
> Good birding,
> Brodie
> Portland
>



------------------------------

Msg: #9 in digest
From: Brodie Cass Talbott <brodietlewis...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 14:52:05 -0800
Subject: [obol] Re: Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse

Yeah, the Quail was my first thought, but it didn't have that snappy sound
to the end of it. Quail area a bird I'm decently familiar with, so when it
didn't match that, I pulled out my app and the sound was, as I remembered,
a dead ringer for the Sibley's recording of Female alarm calls.
The recording does blow, but if you listen to at high volume, you will hear
a very soft whik whik whik call.

FWIW I'm prepared to be convinced that I was wrong, since it fits a pattern
for me :)

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 2:39 PM, Nicholas Mrvelj <nickmrvelj...>
wrote:

> Hey Brodie,
>
> In the recording, I have a hard time hearing the vocalizations I believe
> you are referring to. Besides the Hairy Woodpecker calling loudly, I hear
> what kind of sounds like a Bewick's Wren. I'm assuming the volume is too
> low to pick up what you were hearing. Have you considered California Quail,
> which can be occasionally found in that general vicinty? It seems unlikely
> Ruffed Grouse would be in that area, but you never know. I've only had luck
> with them in higher elevations in Multnomah County and I am far from
> experienced with the species.
>
> Best,
> -Nick
>
> On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 2:15 PM Brodie Cass Talbott <
> <brodietlewis...> wrote:
>
>> Howdy,
>>
>> The Company Lake Harris's Sparrow was present again today around noon.
>>
>> Another bird of note was a calling Ruffed Grouse in the woods less than
>> 10 meters from the Sparrow feeding station.  The call was what is described
>> in the Sibley app as the female alarm call. It started very rapid fire, as
>> I've heard before on Mt. Hood, then slowed to sporadic notes. Only then,
>> and in between the planes landing at the airport, was I able to get a
>> recording. Feel free to let me know if you hear something different:
>>
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42348096
>>
>> Looking at the ebird maps, it appears they're reasonably common along the
>> Sandy River area, and there's one record on the other side of the Sandy
>> from Company Lake, but this appears to be as far West as they have made it
>> towards Portland's east metro area.
>>
>> There's still a good amount of seed on the ground, so someone may be able
>> to get a view of it if there's a decent break in the dogs.
>>
>> Good birding,
>> Brodie
>> Portland
>>
>



------------------------------

Msg: #10 in digest
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
Subject: [obol] What was your best bird/milestone of 2017?
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 15:40:02 -0800

What was your best bird of 2017?  What milestone did you pass?  What was
memorable?


We all mark milestones, some big, some small.  So far, 95 people have
reported their listing results as of the end of 2017.  Won't you join us?
Let us know how you did.



I am compiling Oregon Listing Results for publication by the Oregon Birding
Association.  This is the third call.  If you have kept lists, you're
invited to share.



The gates for submission of your numbers as of Dec. 31, 2017, are open.
There are four ways you can submit.

        1.  Use the online form at
<http://www.orbirds.org/2017/2017/2017.html>
www.orbirds.org/2017/2017/2017.html

        2.  Go to the OBA website and click on the blue box "Send in your
2017 Listing Results"  These will automatically come to me.

3.    Fill out the form at the bottom of this email and email it back to me
at  <mailto:<paultsullivan...> <paultsullivan...>

4.    Print the form at the bottom of this email and mail it to me at Paul
T. Sullivan, 1014 SE Rummel St.,

McMinnville, OR 97128



Lists should conform to the ABA code for listing.



I look forward to receiving your numbers.

Thanks for participating.



Paul T. Sullivan 

-----------------------------------

Oregon Listing Results Form for 2017



Listing results will be compiled by Paul Sullivan for publication on the OBA
website. A summary will appear in the spring issue of Oregon Birds.

The deadline for submission of data is the end of February.
Use the form below to submit your lists as of December 31, 2017. Lists
should conform to the ABA Listing Rules.

The thresholds for publication are as follows:

Oregon State Life List: 300 or more

Western or Eastern Oregon State Life List: 200 or more

Oregon State Year List: 250 or more
Any County Life List: 100 or more
Any County Year List: 100 or more
Oregon Motorless Life List: 100 or more
Oregon Motorless Year List: 100 or more

Birds Photographed in Oregon Life List: 100 or more
Local Circle Life List: 100 or more
Local Circle Year List: 100 or more
Your Yard List: No limit
Your Favorite Refuge: 100 or more
Your Favorite Spot: 100 or more



Your name ________________________________________

Your email ________________________________________



                         

Oregon State                   

______  Life List as of Dec 31, 2017             

______  Year List for 2017           



______  Life List for 18 Western Oregon Counties as of Dec 31, 2017   

______  Life List for 18 Eastern Oregon Counties as of Dec 31, 2017   



Oregon Counties                           

                             

Life Lists as of Dec 31, 2017                             

                             

______  Baker Life List

______  Benton Life List

______  Clackamas Life List

______  Clatsop Life List

______  Columbia Life List

______  Coos Life List

______  Crook Life List

______  Curry Life List

______  Deschutes Life List

______  Douglas Life List

______  Gilliam Life List

______  Grant Life List

______  Harney  Life List

______  Hood River Life List

______  Jackson Life List

______  Jefferson Life List

______  Josephine Life List

______  Klamath Life List

______  Lake Life List

______  Lane Life List

______  Lincoln Life List

______  Linn Life List

______  Malheur Life List

______  Marion Life List

______  Morrow Life List

______  Multnomah Life List

______  Polk Life List

______  Sherman Life List

______  Tillamook Life List

______  Umatilla Life List

______  Union Life List

______  Wallowa Life List

______  Wasco Life List

______  Washington Life List

______  Wheeler Life List

______  Yamhill Life List

                             

2017 Year Lists                 

                             

______  Baker 2017 list

______  Benton  2017 list

______  Clackamas 2017 list

______  Clatsop 2017 list

______  Columbia 2017 list

______  Coos 2017 list

______  Crook 2017 list

______  Curry 2017 list

______  Deschutes 2017 list

______  Douglas 2017 list

______  Gilliam 2017 list

______  Grant 2017 list

______  Harney 2017 list

______  Hood River 2017 list

______  Jackson 2017 list

______  Jefferson 2017 list

______  Josephine 2017 list

______  Klamath 2017 list

______  Lake 2017 list

______  Lane 2017 list

______  Lincoln 2017 list

______  Linn 2017 list

______  Malheur 2017 list

______  Marion  2017 list

______  Morrow 2017 list

______  Multnomah 2017 list

______  Polk 2017 list

______  Sherman 2017 list

______  Tillamook 2017 list

______  Umatilla 2017 list

______  Union 2017 list

______  Wallowa 2017 list

______  Wasco 2017 list

______  Washington 2017 list

______  Wheeler 2017 list

______  Yamhill  2017 list



Oregon Motorless Birding List                   

                             

______  your Oregon motorless life list   

______  your Oregon motorless 2017 list 

                             

Birds Photographed in Oregon                   

                             

______  Life List



Local 15-mile diameter Circle Counts  (describe your circle) ______________


(Sample descriptions: Clatsop County, from Saddle Mtn. to Haystack Rock at
Cannon Beach

                                        Lane County, Eugene CBC circle)

                             

______  your circle life list           

______  your circle 2017 list         

                             

Your yard lists (name nearest city)                           

                             

______  Yard list #1 ______________       

______  Yard list #2 ______________       

                             

Your favorite Wildlife Refuge List (name the refuge)


                             

______  Refuge #1 ______________       

______  Refuge #2 ______________       

                             

Your favorite birding spot (name the spot)                           

                             

______  Spot #1 ______________             

______  Spot #2 ______________




------------------------------

Msg: #11 in digest
From: Brodie Cass Talbott <brodietlewis...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:08:11 -0800
Subject: [obol] Hmm.. Maybe not: Troutdale Harris'/Ruffed Grouse

Now that the exuberance of the afternoon has given way to the sobriety of
self-reflection, and I've listened to a bunch of different calls, I've come
to the more rational conclusion that perhaps it was a Ruffed Grouse and
perhaps it wasn't, and have downgraded it to spuh status. So by all means,
let me know if you find one there!
On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 2:39 PM, Nicholas Mrvelj <nickmrvelj...>
wrote:

> Hey Brodie,
>
> In the recording, I have a hard time hearing the vocalizations I believe
> you are referring to. Besides the Hairy Woodpecker calling loudly, I hear
> what kind of sounds like a Bewick's Wren. I'm assuming the volume is too
> low to pick up what you were hearing. Have you considered California Quail,
> which can be occasionally found in that general vicinty? It seems unlikely
> Ruffed Grouse would be in that area, but you never know. I've only had luck
> with them in higher elevations in Multnomah County and I am far from
> experienced with the species.
>
> Best,
> -Nick
>
> On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 2:15 PM Brodie Cass Talbott <
> <brodietlewis...> wrote:
>
>> Howdy,
>>
>> The Company Lake Harris's Sparrow was present again today around noon.
>>
>> Another bird of note was a calling Ruffed Grouse in the woods less than
>> 10 meters from the Sparrow feeding station.  The call was what is described
>> in the Sibley app as the female alarm call. It started very rapid fire, as
>> I've heard before on Mt. Hood, then slowed to sporadic notes. Only then,
>> and in between the planes landing at the airport, was I able to get a
>> recording. Feel free to let me know if you hear something different:
>>
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42348096
>>
>> Looking at the ebird maps, it appears they're reasonably common along the
>> Sandy River area, and there's one record on the other side of the Sandy
>> from Company Lake, but this appears to be as far West as they have made it
>> towards Portland's east metro area.
>>
>> There's still a good amount of seed on the ground, so someone may be able
>> to get a view of it if there's a decent break in the dogs.
>>
>> Good birding,
>> Brodie
>> Portland
>>
>



------------------------------

Msg: #12 in digest
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
Subject: [obol] Troutdale Ruffed Grouse(?)
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:15:52 -0800

*

  Ruffed Grouse is a riparian species that I wouldn't dismiss on the Sandy River delta.
I've not detected them there, but I have along other lowland streams. One of the least
detected of Oregon's relatively common bird species. Lars
------------------------------

Msg: #13 in digest
From: Megan Cash <mlcash7...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:40:06 -0800
Subject: [obol] Duck ID Help

So, My dad and I were birding the pond at Canby Community Park this
afternoon around 3:00pm. Now, normally my dad and I are pretty decent at
ID-ing birds. But this one threw us for a loop. My first thought was a
really awkward Mallard, and it may yet still be. It was completely brown,
with it's head a darker brown (sometimes slightly purplish in the right
light) and a green-gray wing patch. The distribution of the colors seems
closely consistent with a Mallard, with the head being very dark, a brown
chest with a slight white neck ring in between the two (though not complete
on this bird), the wing patch and a darker rear-end. It's bill also screams
"Duck" to me despite it being a dark grey - sometimes blue-ish - and it's
legs are dark orange.
That being said, maybe it's a Mallard that just has a really awkward
coloring the likes of which I've never seen, but it's size was a bit
ridiculous. It was at least half again as big as the Mallards around it,
almost a decent Cackling Goose size, especially when standing. For some
reason when I look at it, the head screams "Duck" but the body screams
"Goose". I guess it's quite possible for it to simply be an abnormally
large, for lack of a better term "dark-morph" Mallard. Maybe this bird has
been seen around and nobody really reported anything about it because they
clearly knew what it was and didn't think it particularly interesting, but
this bird just has me so insanely confused. Fortunately, I got quite a few
decent pictures, but I would appreciate a little help. Please.

Here's the link to my pictures on Flickr if anyone wants to see them, or
use them to help ID:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/143139614@N05/albums/72157689928120672


--

-Megan Cash
Newberg, OR



------------------------------

Msg: #14 in digest
From: Jacob Mathison <jacobmathison1...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:58:18 -0800
Subject: [obol] Re: Duck ID Help

That thing's giant! Paradise Shelduck? Mallard on steroids?? Mallard x
Egyptian Goose???
Jacob Mathison
jacobmathison1.wixsite.com/nature-photography

<http://jacobmathison1.wixsite.com/nature-photography>
"If you keep a green tree in your heart, perhaps a  singing bird will
come." ~Chinese Proverb

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 5:40 PM, Megan Cash <mlcash7...> wrote:

> So, My dad and I were birding the pond at Canby Community Park this
> afternoon around 3:00pm. Now, normally my dad and I are pretty decent at
> ID-ing birds. But this one threw us for a loop. My first thought was a
> really awkward Mallard, and it may yet still be. It was completely brown,
> with it's head a darker brown (sometimes slightly purplish in the right
> light) and a green-gray wing patch. The distribution of the colors seems
> closely consistent with a Mallard, with the head being very dark, a brown
> chest with a slight white neck ring in between the two (though not complete
> on this bird), the wing patch and a darker rear-end. It's bill also screams
> "Duck" to me despite it being a dark grey - sometimes blue-ish - and it's
> legs are dark orange.
>
>  That being said, maybe it's a Mallard that just has a really awkward
> coloring the likes of which I've never seen, but it's size was a bit
> ridiculous. It was at least half again as big as the Mallards around it,
> almost a decent Cackling Goose size, especially when standing. For some
> reason when I look at it, the head screams "Duck" but the body screams
> "Goose". I guess it's quite possible for it to simply be an abnormally
> large, for lack of a better term "dark-morph" Mallard. Maybe this bird has
> been seen around and nobody really reported anything about it because they
> clearly knew what it was and didn't think it particularly interesting, but
> this bird just has me so insanely confused. Fortunately, I got quite a few
> decent pictures, but I would appreciate a little help. Please.
>
> Here's the link to my pictures on Flickr if anyone wants to see them, or
> use them to help ID:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/143139614@N05/albums/72157689928120672
>
>
> --
>
> -Megan Cash
> Newberg, OR
>



------------------------------

Msg: #15 in digest
Subject: [obol] Re: Duck ID Help
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 18:06:33 -0800

*
This is a domestic Mallard. Maybe a pure breed, maybe a mongrel. Lars
On Jan 29, 2018, at 5:40 PM, Megan Cash wrote:

> So, My dad and I were birding the pond at Canby Community Park this afternoon around 3:00pm. Now, normally my dad and I are pretty decent at ID-ing birds. But this one threw us for a loop. My first thought was a really awkward Mallard, and it may yet still be. It was completely brown, with it's head a darker brown (sometimes slightly purplish in the right light) and a green-gray wing patch. The distribution of the colors seems closely consistent with a Mallard, with the head being very dark, a brown chest with a slight white neck ring in between the two (though not complete on this bird), the wing patch and a darker rear-end. It's bill also screams "Duck" to me despite it being a dark grey - sometimes blue-ish - and it's legs are dark orange.
>
>  That being said, maybe it's a Mallard that just has a really awkward coloring the likes of which I've never seen, but it's size was a bit ridiculous. It was at least half again as big as the Mallards around it, almost a decent Cackling Goose size, especially when standing. For some reason when I look at it, the head screams "Duck" but the body screams "Goose". I guess it's quite possible for it to simply be an abnormally large, for lack of a better term "dark-morph" Mallard. Maybe this bird has been seen around and nobody really reported anything about it because they clearly knew what it was and didn't think it particularly interesting, but this bird just has me so insanely confused. Fortunately, I got quite a few decent pictures, but I would appreciate a little help. Please.
>
> Here's the link to my pictures on Flickr if anyone wants to see them, or use them to help ID:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/143139614@N05/albums/72157689928120672
>
>
> --
>
> -Megan Cash
> Newberg, OR



------------------------------

Msg: #16 in digest
From: Torrey G-T <tgagetomlinson...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 18:11:01 -0800
Subject: [obol] Lewis's Woodpecker- Eugene

There has been a Lewis's Woodpecker at this location
https://www.google.com/maps/place/43%C2%B059'18.8%22N+122%C2%B059'42.6%22W/@43.988564,-122.9957125,187m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d43.9885628!4d-122.9951644
on Mathews Rd. near Goshen. My dad found it yesterday while walking and it
has been present two days straight along with an Acorn Woodpecker in an Oak
tree just before a long black gated driveway on the right (coming from
I-5).
Torrey



------------------------------

Msg: #17 in digest
From: ed mcv <ed.mcvicker...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 18:39:11 -0800
Subject: [obol] Mult. Co. Harris's Sparrow

Harris's Sparrow photos
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/10665268@N04/albums/72157665199627488>.
I parked in the NE corner of the huge FedEx lot at the end of Sundial Rd.
and went up a paved path, around a locked gate and over the dike/40 mile
loop trail to the gravel trail described by others.  The sparrow flock was
no more than 100 yds in - near one of the "Wildlife" gates.  There is a No
Trespassing sign posted next to the gate near the parking lot.  Up on the
dike and along the gravel path are numerous Port of Portland signs and one
shot-up Reynolds Aluminum sign.

Are we guilty of trespassing to access the top of the dike/loop trail?



------------------------------

Msg: #18 in digest
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:15:09 -0800
Subject: [obol] TV among birds along I-5, Ashland to Salem

atowhee.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/a-little-freeway-birding-2/
--
Harry Fuller
author of: *San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:*
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2017/04/20/sfnh/
author of *Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA*:
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/the-great-gray-owl-book/
author of *Freeway Birding*: *freewaybirding.com
<http://freewaybirding.com>*
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



------------------------------

Msg: #19 in digest
From: Dave Helzer <davehelzerian...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:40:18 -0800
Subject: [obol] Re: Wallowa Co Gyrfalcon

I was curious about the new ebird Sensitive Species blocks and looked it up
on thier site. Gyrfalcon inclusion is specifically due to risk from
falconry trade.
http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2879207

Dave Helzer
Portland, OR
=====

*Subject: Re: Wallowa Co Gyrfalcon*
Date: Mon Jan 29 2018 9:56 am
From: celata AT pacifier.com


Unless someone has specific information from eBird regarding the
gyrfalcon/falcon-trade connection, I think we're making an assumption
that may not be entirely valid regarding the placement of Gyrfalcon
on the blocked list.

If we look at the other species that have been blocked, they appear
to be species sensitive to human disturbance in general and subject to
too much love from birders and photographers. Perhaps we are deflecting
when we should be looking at behaviors closer to home. The problems
associated with disturbances caused by people who want to get a better
look or a better photograph are well documented and the multiply in
areas where human population densities are high and wild spaces are
low. It would not be the first time that an issue associated with
urban populations is handled asymmetrically by eBird. I have referred
to it as the East Coast bias, but it could just as easily be labeled the
Southern California Bias or the Portland bias.

This does not dilute from the larger problem with eBird's solution to
the disturbance issue. They've used a chainsaw when a scalpel would
have been more appropriate and I hope the folks at eBird are listening
to the very real concern many of us have about the suppression of data
we are choosing to donate to them.


--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
That question...
http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
<http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p294>
POST: Send your post to <obol...>
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
<http://www.freelists.org/list/obol>
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>



------------------------------

Msg: #20 in digest
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:55:30 -0800
Subject: [obol] Coos WW Crossbill 1/28/18

I was down at Lost Lake which is south of Bandon and inland about a mile or
so from the ocean. It is mostly shore pine and dunes with Sitka spruce on
the ridgelines (old dunes). I had a WW Crossbill fly over calling and land
just out of sight. Just as I got to where it was and raised my bins off it
flew. I heard it or a different bird a while later. Also several Red
Crossbill flocks.
I have heard WWs a half dozen times now in the county but have still only
seen a single bird...

Tim R
Coos Bay



------------------------------

Msg: #21 in digest
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 20:02:31 -0800
Subject: [obol] Re: Duck ID Help
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman...>

Hi - 
Lars is correct.  It is a domestic breed of mallard.  I do not see any evidence of other species involved.  A variety of waterfowl have been domesticated, but three species, Mallard, Graylag Goose, and Swan Goose were have been in domestication much longer and have yielded a surprising diversity of breeds.  This is one of several that were bred for very large size, among other traits.  Useful for a particularly large Turduckin?

Wayne














On 1/29/2018 6:08:33 PM, Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...> wrote:
*

This is a domestic Mallard. Maybe a pure breed, maybe a mongrel. Lars

On Jan 29, 2018, at 5:40 PM, Megan Cash wrote:

So, My dad and I were birding the pond at Canby Community Park this afternoon around 3:00pm. Now, normally my dad and I are pretty decent at ID-ing birds. But this one threw us for a loop. My first thought was a really awkward Mallard, and it may yet still be. It was completely brown, with it's head a darker brown (sometimes slightly purplish in the right light) and a green-gray wing patch. The distribution of the colors seems closely consistent with a Mallard, with the head being very dark, a brown chest with a slight white neck ring in between the two (though not complete on this bird), the wing patch and a darker rear-end. It's bill also screams "Duck" to me despite it being a dark grey - sometimes blue-ish - and it's legs are dark orange.

 That being said, maybe it's a Mallard that just has a really awkward coloring the likes of which I've never seen, but it's size was a bit ridiculous. It was at least half again as big as the Mallards around it, almost a decent Cackling Goose size, especially when standing. For some reason when I look at it, the head screams "Duck" but the body screams "Goose". I guess it's quite possible for it to simply be an abnormally large, for lack of a better term "dark-morph" Mallard. Maybe this bird has been seen around and nobody really reported anything about it because they clearly knew what it was and didn't think it particularly interesting, but this bird just has me so insanely confused. Fortunately, I got quite a few decent pictures, but I would appreciate a little help. Please.

Here's the link to my pictures on Flickr if anyone wants to see them, or use them to help ID:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/143139614@N05/albums/72157689928120672 [https://www.flickr.com/photos/143139614@N05/albums/72157689928120672]


--


-Megan Cash
Newberg, OR


------------------------------

Msg: #22 in digest
From: David Mandell <davidmandell...>
Subject: [obol] Sandy River Delta & Ruffed Grouse
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 20:14:49 -0800

I think it was about eight years ago, I heard a Ruffed Grouse drumming at Sand River Delta.  I wasn’t able to see the bird, but it was reasonable close and I had no doubt about what I was hearing.  I believe it was in late April or early May. I posted it on OBOL at the time and a bit of conversation about their former status on the valley floor ensued, as well as a very similar posting from Lars.  I’m sure the conversation is captured somewhere in the ether.
Best,

David Mandell

Sent from Mail for Windows 10



------------------------------

Msg: #23 in digest
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 21:16:50 -0800
From: <jmeredit...>
Subject: [obol] Mc Cowns Longspur, Klamath Falls area

Forwarding a note by Peter Low about birding the weekend in Klamath
area.
Date: 01-29-2018 21:11
From: PETER LOW <plbirder...>

This weekend was my annual trip to Klamath Falls and on Saturday 1/27/18
I found a McCowen's Longspur with at least  20 Lapland Longspurs within
a flock of about 200 Horned Larks.  The number of birds plus their
constant movement back and forth between fields and vegetation made it
difficult to relocate each time. I would loved to have spent more time
with this bird but time was a constraint. I did not see tail pattern but
what I did see ruled out all other Longspurs.
  First noticed Longspur with plain buff face, lack of dark ear covert
surround, prominent pale supercilium and unstreaked underparts. A darker
Grayish band across chest mimicked pattern of adult breeding male. 
Rufous median coverts stood out as it was the only Rufous seen on the
bird, also indicating a male in basic plumage.  Bill, pale and looked
heavier than nearby Lapland Longspur.
  Location was off Township Road, heading east it was I believe the
first drain that was drivable, and about halfway down.  Sorry I do not
know the name of the Drain but on the left side field was stubble, on
the right looked like very short grazed grass.  Hopefully locals will
know where I mean, so basically where grazing turns to arable.
  Opposite, on North side of Township was a flock of Horned Larks
numbering about 400 birds but no Longspurs present.  Just past mile
marker 6 was huge flock of Blackbirds, 3000+, it contained many
Tri-coloreds and 2 Yellow-headed Blackbirds, and saw One Cowbird.
  One other Bird of note was a Bewick's Swan seen very well and close.
It was on LKWR auto route between C and B.  Many thousands of waterfowl
here, very spectacular.  Also, 10 plus Cackling Geese here along with
Ross's, Snow, Greater White-fronted and Tundra Swan, again time was a
Constraint.
  Moore Park had One California Towhee and Several Titmouse.

Peter Low.
Bend Oregon.

------------------------------

Msg: #24 in digest
From: Pamela Johnston <shovzan...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 21:17:05 -0800
Subject: [obol] Re: Sandy River Delta & Ruffed Grouse

The particular part of the ether is the obol archives, which are available
at freelists.org. Look up obol there, and the archive link is easy to see.
That doesn't mean that the thread is going to jump out at you, but with a
few clues like these, it can be located.
Pamela Johnston

On Jan 29, 2018 8:15 PM, "David Mandell" <davidmandell...> wrote:

> I think it was about eight years ago, I heard a Ruffed Grouse drumming at
> Sand River Delta.  I wasn’t able to see the bird, but it was reasonable
> close and I had no doubt about what I was hearing.  I believe it was in
> late April or early May. I posted it on OBOL at the time and a bit of
> conversation about their former status on the valley floor ensued, as well
> as a very similar posting from Lars.  I’m sure the conversation is captured
> somewhere in the ether.
>
>
>
> Best,
>
>
>
> David Mandell
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkIdU0986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
>


------------------------------

Msg: #25 in digest
Subject: [obol] Re: Pipits at Ankeny NWR
From: "Marcia F. Cutler" <marciafcutler...>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 13:07:26 -0800

The Corvallis CBC had good results for American Pipits - 1161, with the bulk of them seen either around the Corvallis Airport area or in the Central Linn County area (Willamette River east to Davis Rd and Tangent Sewage Ponds). They were widespread however, seen in 9 of the 14 areas.
There were a lot fewer Horned Larks - 25 - and they were seen mostly in the Airport area with a couple seen in nearby sections.
The day of the count, Dec. 19th, was relatively early in the count period and was the first really rainy day after several rather dry weeks.

Marcia F. Cutler

On Jan 28, 2018, at 8:27 PM, David Irons <llsdirons...> wrote:

> I have seen flocks of 100+ birds in southern Linn County during winter. I think its safe to assume that thousands of pipits winter out in the south central Willamette Valley, where there are many many square miles (much of it inaccessible to birders) quality pipit habitat. As for Horned Larks, I have almost never seen them, or any other species mixed in pipit flocks. Sadly, not even other species of vagrant pipits. Conversely, lark flocks of Horned Larks are good for yielding the occasional longspur. Just in western Oregon I've seen Lapland, Chestnut-collared and McCown's Longspurs with Streaked Horned Larks. Still looking for that Smith's to complete the set. 
>
> Dave Irons
> Beaverton, OR
>
>
> From: <obol-bounce...> <obol-bounce...> on behalf of Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Sent: Monday, January 29, 2018 2:43 AM
> To: <ptrail...>
> Cc: OBOL Birders Online
> Subject: [obol] Re: Pipits at Ankeny NWR

> The valley gets some big pipit flocks in winter.  I have seen flocks of 75+ at Baskett Slough.
>
>
> Alan Contreras
> <acontrer56...>
>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Jan 28, 2018, at 6:40 PM, Pepper Trail <ptrail...> wrote:
>>
>> I'm not sure how unusual this is for the Willamette Valley, but there was a flock of at least 75 American Pipits in the field north of Buena Vista Road just east of the Eagle Marsh viewpoint.  There didn't seem to be any horned larks with them, sadly.
>>
>> Pepper Trail, Ashland



------------------------------

End of obol Digest V7 #34
*************************




 
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