Date: 1/11/18 7:01 pm
From: Walter Szeliga <walter.szeliga...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RE: Sparrow conjecture: Where would you find 4 Zonotrichias together in one place? It's Happening in TX this Winter
The Front Range of Colorado routinely has four Zonotrichia in the Winter and once even had a FIVE Zonotrichia Winter; the entire genus! Now, the fifth and final Zonotrichia was a Rufous-collared Sparrow (Z. capensis) that was later determined to be from a non-migratory, equatorial subspecies, suggesting that it was formerly a cage-bird. Even if it didn’t count, it was possible to see, with little driving, all Zonotrichia in one day. Have a read over at Nathan Pieplow's excellent ear-birding blog to see how the bird was identified to subspecies (http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3112 <http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3112>).

Now that we’ve started talking about Zonotrichia, how about the places were one can see all of Gavia in a day. I know it’s been done in Colorado, and it’s probably been done in Washington.

Cheers,
Walter Szeliga
Ellensburg, WA

P.S. Seeing as many Poecile sp. as possible in one location has always been a fun side project. It’s surprising where you can do this too.
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