Date: 12/26/17 5:19 pm
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: helping window strike victims
All,


BirdSafe Pittsburgh is doing a lot of great research into preventing window strikes. Matt Webb, who I know, has lots of different methods for greatly reducing strikes, and as of a few weeks ago, had free substrates to help with that. I'd recommend looking up BirdSafe Pittsburgh online and trying that.


Cheers,


Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA


________________________________
From: Audubon birding discussion for WV <WV-BIRD...> on behalf of Bird Mom <pep4223...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 7:47 PM
To: <WV-BIRD...>
Subject: helping window strike victims

This afternoon, my neighbor knocked on the front door, asking if I would look at an injured bird in their driveway. Of course I would, and I grabbed a coat and out I went. A Tufted Titmouse was a window strike victim from their car window. The vehicle happened to be in direct sunlight at the time. The titmouse was sitting next to the vehicle, directly under the cars side window. It was a good teachable moment for the neighbors, who had never seen a window strike victim. This was the first time I had seen a window strike on a vehicle window.

We have a bit of a problem these days in the Eastern Panhandle of WV. To my knowledge, we no longer have a place where we can take injured wildlife that is a reasonable drive for us. Our two wildlife rescues in VA that are near us no longer can/will accept any wildlife from West Virginia. I'm sure there are legal reasons for that, but I hope a solution can be reached that would allow us some place to take these critters in need. I suspect the financial donations from us in the Eastern Panhandle of WV to these Virginia non-profits have ceased as a result of this. I hope we can change this.

After getting a shallow box and a towel to line the box, I walked up to the dazed titmouse, picked it up in my hands and gently placed it in the box. It's eyes were open but it was obviously dazed. The bird suddenly had a burst of adrenaline, and I quickly found it crawling up my jacket, clinging to the zipper that allowed it to climb up to my shoulder. I didn't expect that! I could see that the wings were in good shape, and it didn't appear to have broken bones.

My husband and I carefully got it back into the box and closed the flaps. We took it into our garage to get it out of the cold wind and into a darker place where it could rest without fear of being eaten by predators. There it sat in the box with the lid flaps open for the next few hours, with me checking on it periodically. It spent the afternoon fluffed up in the towel in the shallow box with its head tucked into its feathers, hopefully resting. It was late afternoon and the sun was going down soon. When I checked on the bird, its head was up, eyes open and it was sitting quietly in the box, not wanting to go anywhere. It did not try to fly away. I put some dried mealworms in the box just in case, and let it be. It is spending the night in our attached garage, which will be warmer than outside exposed to the elements. My hope is that it will get needed rest this evening, and I can open the garage door tomorrow morning, and it will fly away.

Here is a link with good info from National Audubon about how to help a window strike victim: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/
[https://files.allaboutbirds.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/collision_spread.jpg]<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/>

Why Birds Hit Windows—and How You Can Help Prevent It ...<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/>
www.allaboutbirds.org
For birds, glass windows are worse than invisible. By reflecting foliage or sky, they look like inviting places to fly into. And because the sheer numbe...




Cross your fingers for this little guy!

BIRDMOM
Jefferson County, WV
 
Join us on Facebook!