Date: 11/9/17 6:26 pm
From: Thomas W. Reed <coturnicops...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Cape May, 9 Nov - White-winged Dove, Cave Swallows, Goshawk
Thursday was mild and relatively calm, with a sea breeze developing during
the late morning. Migrants were evident on radar during the previous night,
though many of these birds appeared to be moving on a NE->SW trajectory and
today's morning flight was fairly limited at Cape May Point. Still, a few
thousand American Robins were over the Point this AM, along with assorted
late-season migrants (blackbirds, E. Bluebird, Am. Pipit, Yellow-rumped
Warbler) and at least one Dickcissel. Notable was a single Purple Finch
that flew over during the early-AM; the species has been quite scarce here
this fall. A few Cave and Barn swallows were still present at the Point
this morning. Today's hawk flight was fairly light, as might be expected on
e/se winds, but still featured a Northern Goshawk and a Broad-winged Hawk.

Waterbird migration continues at a solid clip. The Avalon Seawatch tacked
on another 27,000 birds today, perhaps highlighted by an obvious arrival of
Red-throated Loons (1500+), 30 Tundra Swans, 24 Common Eiders, and a couple
Common Terns. On the other side of the peninsula Bonaparte's Gulls moved
south out of Delaware Bay, with 500+ seen from Cape May Point during the
AM. Several Parasitic Jaegers were again detected in the rips, along with 3
lingering Black Skimmers.

The White-winged Dove was seen again today along Seagrove Ave in Cape May
Point. Other odds and ends included continuing Clay-colored Sparrow and
Orange-crowned Warbler at the Rea Farm, White-eyed and Red-eyed vireos at
Higbee Beach, Indigo Bunting at Cape May Pt. State Park, and Baltimore
Oriole along New England Road. Dozens of Monarchs could still be found at
Cape May Pt. this morning--some crossing the bay toward Delaware, others
hanging out in the dunes.

As always, a big thank-you to all the observers who shared sightings
through the day.


best,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com


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