Date: 11/8/17 5:09 pm
From: Thomas W. Reed <coturnicops...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Cape May, 8 Nov - Pacific Loon, White-winged Dove, Cave Swallows
It was an interesting Wednesday around Cape May, with lots of visible
migration and a few surprises.

There was a steady southbound movement of waterbirds over and along the
immediate coast throughout the day. At Cape May Point we saw 200+ Common
and 500+ Red-throated loons roll through during the AM hours, along with a
steady parade of Ring-billed, Laughing, & Herring gulls, Double-crested
Cormorants, and scoters. A Pacific Loon flew west past the Point during the
early-AM. A couple of Tundra Swans departed sw. toward Delaware and a flock
of 43 Snow Geese included 35 blues, an unusually high total locally.
Killdeer were obviously on the move, with 125+ moving west past the Point
during the AM, along with a late American Golden-Plover. The Avalon
Seawatch turned in a 13,000-bird day (
http://trektellen.org/count/view/1747/20171108).

Landbird migration was also evident through the day. About 150 American
Pipits moved past Cape May Pt. in small flocks during the morning, along
with a couple Horned Larks, a few Rusty Blackbirds, and thousands of
American Robins. Raptors showed surprisingly well given the ne. winds and
low clouds, with 92 Red-shouldered Hawks, 52 Northern Harriers, and a
Golden Eagle tallied at the Hawkwatch, plus a Short-eared Owl out over the
water during the mid-AM. A White-winged Dove flew over the hawkwatch around
9am; it was later seen in a Cape May Pt. backyard. Songbird numbers on the
ground seemed reduced from what we'd seen the past few days. In the
unseasonal dept., a Yellow-throated Vireo was found near Cape May Court
House, while Yellow-billed Cuckoo and Indigo Bunting were again seen at
Cape May Pt. State Park. More Cave Swallows apparently arrived today, with
20-30+ present at Cape May Pt. through at least mid-afternoon. Also notable
was a single flock of 9 Barn Swallows that passed the hawkwatch at one
point this AM, and a lingering Chimney Swift.

Other odds and ends included the continuing Redhead and Tundra Swan in the
Meadows plover pond, a Green Heron at Lily Lake, Orange-crowned Warbler and
Clay-colored Sparrow at the Rea Farm, and several Parasitic Jaegers in the
Cape May Pt. rips.


best,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com


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