Date: 9/30/17 3:59 pm
From: David Seibel <dseibelphoto...>
Subject: Re: Morton County Question
Jim,

To expand on Tom's reply, Birds of Kansas (Thompson et al. 2011) describes
Yellow-bellied as an uncommon transient and winter resident statewide;
Red-naped, a rare transient in extreme western Kansas only. As of 2/2/2017,
the Kansas Bird Records Committee has only accepted a total of 10 records
of the latter, ever (http://www.ksbirds.org/KBRC/kbrcrvulist.html), so the
odds are in favor of seeing a Yellow-bellied even in Morton County.
However, the western two tiers of counties are the only place where there's
a reasonable chance that a sapsucker might be a Red-naped instead of a
Yellow-bellied.

-David Seibel
www.davidseibel.com
www.BirdsInFocus.com

<http://www.BirdsInFocus.com>

On Thu, Sep 28, 2017 at 9:44 PM, Tom SHANE <tom.shane...> wrote:

> September has been our best month for finding RNSAs, especially at Scott
> Park. However, they are very very rare.
> Tom Shane
> Garden City
>
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For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
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For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
To contact a listowner, send a message to
mailto:<ksbird-l-request...>
 
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