Date: 9/10/17 3:55 pm
From: Jim Anderson <jimnaturalist...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Western MeadowLark help
Howdy All,

Is the Western Meadowlark still our State Bird or did those knuckle heads
in Salem mess that up as well...

Jim-in-Sisters

On Sun, Sep 10, 2017 at 9:10 AM, Joel Geier <joel.geier...> wrote:

> Hi David (and others who might have similar questions).
>
> Baskett Slough NWR is one of the best places in the Willamette Valley to
> see Western Meadowlarks, year-round. There is a nesting population of 30
> or more pairs which are easiest to see in April through June when males
> are singing from perches.
>
> Finley NWR and the West Eugene Wetlands also have substantial nesting
> populations, and there are also some nesting on private agricultural
> land in Linn County, and in the Umpqua Valley. But those places are a
> longer drive from the Portland metro area.
>
> At this point in the year, they're more difficult to see than during
> nesting season but they still should be around. Good places to look are
> along Coville Road east of the refuge (where nearly the whole area north
> of the road is being restored with native prairie plants), and along
> Morris Rd (off of Smithfield Rd.) and Livermore Rd. north of the
> refuge.
>
> You could also try walking up the Rich Guadagno memorial trail to the
> top of Baskett Butte. The native upland prairie remnant on the upper
> part of the butte is prime nesting habitat. I'd guess there are still
> meadowlarks up there, taking advantage of insects which tend to be
> abundant in botanically diverse grasslands.
>
> Over the next month or so, meadowlark numbers in the valley will
> increase as the resident population is bolstered by arrival of wintering
> birds from east of the Cascades.
>
> Once those birds arrive, there could be flock of up to 50 meadowlarks in
> practically any grass field in areas with open landscapes in the
> mid-Willamette Valley (particularly in eastern Polk County, western Linn
> County, eastern Benton County, and adjacent parts of Lane County). It
> becomes a matter of random chance to spot them. Often they'll feed right
> alongside of European Starlings (which are remarkably similar in shape
> and winter foraging habits), so watch for "starlings" with white outer
> tail feathers when a flock picks up and flies for a short distance.
>
> Good luck!
> Joel
>
>
> From: David Lantz <lantz503...>
> Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2017 11:19:37 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Western MeadowLark help
>
> A friend of mine has never seen a Western Meadowlark and would like to
> see one for they migrate to. It looks like baskets Slough might be my
> best chance. I am in Washington County. Does anyone have a
> recommendation?
> Thank you in advance, David
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>
>
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--
Jim
Please note my new email address: <jimnaturalist...>

 
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