Date: 8/29/17 11:18 pm
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...>
Subject: Re: Subject: Roseate Spoonbills
Tom, your paper is a model of how it should be done. But, it's 2017, and the BOK was done in 2011, your work 2011. If you are so insecure in that thinking your work isn't important that's your problem. But, I'd like to think a potential new manuscript would start with your very fine paper.

Your contributions to KS ornithology are tremendous, but let your demons go. Your contributions to KOS are second to none, but your continued bashing, for whatever reasons, are diminishing your luster...let the demons go.

You are respected for your contributions to KS ornithology, KOS, and the understanding of the history of ornithologist who are from or worked in KS. How can you not be happy with that? Let the demons go!

You take everything as a personal assault. My intent was to get folks to submit manuscripts. There was a thread concerning whether or not the first spoonbill was from the hurricane (started on FB). There was a response, likely not and why. Then 3 more show up as the hurricane pound TX. Coincidence? Post breeding wondering? Great breeding year? New breeding locales? Maybe every KS spoonbill record could be examined with weather data. Ideas, Tom, questions Tom, the essence of science, the advancement of such. It has nothing to do with a personal attack on your fine work. Now release the demons, set yourself free and submit some manuscripts so you can continue the exemplary contributions to understanding the avifauna of KS and the Great Plains.

Gene Young
Ark City
NOC
Editor, KOS Bulletin

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2017, at 11:35 PM, Tom SHANE <tom.shane...> wrote:
>
> Yikes; I guess our paper in the December 2001 KOS Bulletin was a complete failure:?
>
> http://www.ksbirds.org/kos/bulletin/Vol52No4.pdf
>
> T Shane
> Out here in continually rejected country.
>
>
> Subject: Roseate Spoonbills
> Date: Tue Aug 29 2017 9:33 am
> From: EUGENE.YOUNG AT noc.edu
>
> Even better, a manuscript for the KOS Bulletin. Could summarize the records for KS, locations, examine nearby breeding locations, are these records likely vagrancy from post-breeding or are they tied to hurricanes, is population increasing nearby, etc. It would make a nice contribution to understanding this species in the Plains.
>
> Eugene A. Young
>
> Editor, Kansas Ornithological Society Bulletin
>
>
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