Date: 4/20/17 2:31 pm
From: Tyler Hallman <hallmanator...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Fwd: Possible State bird replacements for Western Meadowlark
Are state birds awarded special protections?

On Apr 20, 2017 2:13 PM, "Jeffrey Tufts" <jctufts33...> wrote:

> Has anyone asked why Senator Girod is interested in changing the state
> bird of Oregon ? According to the biography on his web page, he was
> elected to the State House of Representatives in 1992 and 2006. He was
> appointed to the State Senate in 2008. Is making the Osprey the state bird
> of Oregon a pet project in which he's been engaged for many years? Or did
> he just recently take up the cause? If the latter, why after so many years
> ?
>
> It would seem that any discussion on OBOL about possible replacements
> (other than Osprey) gives Senator Girod (and his supporters in this
> cause--whoever they are) added encouragement and ammuntion.
>
> In the Western Meadowlark, Oregon has a wonderful state bird. Sorry to
> see that anyone on OBOL is even considering any other species.
>
> Jeff Tufts
> Medford OR
>
>
> On Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 1:45 PM, George Neavoll <gneavoll...>
> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>> *From: *George Neavoll <gneavoll...>
>> *Subject: **Re: [obol] Possible State bird replacements for Western
>> Meadowlark*
>> *Date: *April 20, 2017 1:42:17 PM PDT
>> *To: *<jmoodie...>
>> *Cc: *OBOL Birders Online <obol...>
>>
>> There is absolutely nothing wrong with Oregon's having the beautiful - in
>> body and song - Western Meadowlark as our state bird. If other states
>> wanted to follow our lead in designating the meadowlark - 90 YEARS AGO - as
>> several have, more power to them. They, too, have chosen a beautiful bird.
>>
>> More than beauty is involved here, though. The Western Meadowlark was a
>> common bird as I was growing up in the Willamette Valley in the '40s and
>> '50s, but no more. Loss of habitat and other factors impelled them to leave
>> many of their old familiar haunts, or disappear altogether. They need every
>> bit of help they can get, and if its designation as Oregon's state bird
>> does that, even to a small degree, that is a good thing.
>>
>> Legislators made a good choice in 1927 when they made the Western
>> Meadowlark our state bird. It wouldn't take much for them to take up the
>> "bird of the moment," and go with it instead. Let's not encourage them.
>>
>> GEORGE NEAVOLL
>> S.W. Portland
>>
>>
>> On Apr 20, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Jim Moodie wrote:
>>
>> I did a quick scan of ranges using Thayer’s Birding Software version 7.
>> Using the eyeball test for species with broad distribution in the state,
>> but fairly restricted outside of the state, I came up with:
>>
>> Mountain Quail (can be hard to see)
>> Flammulated Owl (ditto)
>>
>> Rufous Hummingbird (I ignored ranges into Canada. OK, and Alaska)
>>
>> Red-breasted Sapsucker
>> White-headed Woodpecker
>>
>> Cassin’s Vireo
>> Pacific Wren
>> Hermit Warbler
>> Wilson’s Warbler (ignoring Canada again)
>>
>> Given the restrictions of range to the west side of the state for Hermit
>> Warbler, I would lean towards Rufous Hummingbird: green and orange (UO &
>> OSU alumni can get behind this), colorful, entertaining, easy to see with a
>> feeder in place, and feisty! There are no hummer species representing any
>> state at present.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> jim
>>
>> Dr. Jim Moodie
>> Science Dept
>> COCC
>>
>> *From:* <obol-bounce...> [mailto:<obol-bounce...>] *On
>> Behalf Of *Tyler Hallman
>> *Sent:* Thursday, April 20, 2017 9:32 AM
>> *To:* Wayne Hoffman
>> *Cc:* Darrel Faxon; Oregon Birders OnLine
>> *Subject:* [obol] Re: hermit warbler questions
>>
>> I'm all for it. I'd take the Hermit or Townsend's Warbler over Osprey.
>> Despite the history of the Western Meadowlark as the state bird, it has
>> always bothered me how many other states have it.
>>
>> We seem to have conflicting requirements here.
>> 1. *Statewide*: We want a bird that is present throughout the state.
>> 2. *Uniquely Oregonian*: We want a bird that is not common in other
>> states.
>>
>> Oregon is a large diverse state. It would be quite difficult to find a
>> species that occurs throughout the huge diversity of habitats statewide
>> while somehow being restricted from bordering states. If state borders were
>> created based on changes in habitat, then such a feat would be far easier.
>> As is, it seems to me that any species that occurs statewide will also
>> occur in many other states.
>>
>> That said, I'd be all for a species that is uniquely west coast, yet not
>> so habitat restricted as to only be visible on the coast itself.
>>
>> I'd hypothetically be all for Hermit Warblers! Throw my vote in this
>> hypothetical decision.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> On Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 9:20 AM, Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...> wrote:
>>
>> Good questions.
>>
>> I doubt that they breed regularly anywhere east of Hwy 97.
>>
>> If we are considering Meadowlark replacements as State Bird, I would
>> suggest a different species that has not yet been brought up, but has some
>> things in its favor.
>>
>> 1. It does breed in Oregon, but not so extensively as Hermit Warbler.
>> 2. Some also winter in the state.
>> 3. It probably is regular in every Oregon county, at least in migration.
>>
>> 4. It is not the State Bird of any other state.
>> 5. It is beautiful and considered a real treat by nearly everyone who
>> sees it.
>> 6. It's range is larger than that of Hermit Warbler, but is still pretty
>> much a west coast/Rocky Mountain specialty.
>>
>> This is one of the Hermit Warbler's closest relatives: Townsend's
>> Warbler.
>>
>> Wayne
>>
>> On 4/20/2017 7:15:56 AM, <5hats...> <5hats...> wrote:
>>
>> In just how many counties east of the Cascades is Hermit Warbler a
>> breeding species? In just how many of them has it even been recorded?
>>
>> Darrel
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Tyler Hallman M.S.
>> Ph.D. Student
>> Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
>> Oregon State University Corvallis
>>
>> "You miss one hundred percent of the shots you never take."
>> -Wayne Gretzky
>>
>> "We're becoming paleontologists describing things that are already
>> extinct."
>> -Luis Coloma regarding herpetologists
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

 
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