Date: 4/19/17 11:12 am
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: [obol] Re: The most Oregonian bird?
I had thought about trying something like Tait's distributional analysis
but it seemed like too much work.
Which it clearly was. Very interesting. Thanks Tait.

But on the subject of 'Cackling' Geese, I had mentioned that the last
(20+/- yrs ago) attempt to supplant
Western Meadowlark was with Dusky Canada Goose, still a true Canada Goose
(B. canadensis occidentalis).
This met with a similar resistance.but it had a certain rationale.

This (current) subspecies has a very narrow range, breeding in the Copper
River Delta area and wintering virtually entirely in Oregon. But with the
current splitomania, who knows?
It was and still is an endangered (sub)species, oddly because it's small
nesting area was greatly disturbed by the Alaska earthquake.
It's a very handsome bird (for a goose that is, reference the g**-d*****
Canada Goose in the dumb-bird field guide.)
In addition to identification by birders, its identification is of real
interest to hunters who have to learn to ID it so that they can limit or
eliminate take of this bird as a conservation move (depending on the yearly
bag limits). Heaven knows we have plenty of the more abundant subspecies.
I haven't seen any Duskies frequenting the MacDonald's environment as yet.
It can be readily observed from roads, often in the original range of the
Western Meadowlark, but still available during winter.

I'm not advocating for it, of course. And certainly, the Osprey, with a
worldwide distribution, doesn't make much sense.

Bob OBrien





On Wed, Apr 19, 2017 at 12:54 AM, <pnitens...> wrote:

> I thought that was an interesting question, so took a stab at answering it
> by crunching some ebird bar-chart data that I had available (one caveat is
> I only looked at pre-2016 US data). After playing with the numbers a bit,
> my definition of "most uniquely Oregonian" turned out to be what one sees
> more easily in Oregon than in any other state.
>
> I first queried which birds appear on Oregon lists more frequently than on
> lists from any other US state and came up with:
>
> species | % Oregon lists
> ------------------------------------------
> White-capped Albatross | 0.00032809
> Red-breasted Goose | 0.00032815
> Wandering Albatross | 0.00065618
> Murphy's Petrel | 0.018373
> Tundra Bean-Goose | 0.085978
> Northern Pygmy-Owl | 0.70303
> Olive-sided Flycatcher | 1.9213
> Hermit Warbler | 2.5235
> Vaux's Swift | 4.7247
> Red-breasted Sapsucker | 5.1729
> Swainson's Thrush | 6.5426
> Western Tanager | 7.2922
> Cackling Goose | 7.3949
> Brown Creeper | 8.169
> Black-headed Grosbeak | 9.2638
> Steller's Jay | 23.274
> Spotted Towhee | 28.436
> Dark-eyed Junco | 32.392
>
> The number of ebird lists that White-capped Albatross, Red-breasted Goose,
> Wandering Albatross or Murphy's Petrel appear on is really low, so I didn't
> bother with them anymore.
>
> Similarly, the Tundra Bean-Goose was a one season wonder.
>
> The other species seemed like legitimate contenders, so I thought I would
> look at how often they appear on the lists of the other states where they
> are most frequently reported and compare the percentage of lists in Oregon
> with the percentage of lists of the next closest state. (That data begins
> below after the next paragraph).
>
> Of species that breed in Oregon, Hermit Warbler is seen almost twice as
> often in Oregon as in any other state. Of species that winter in Oregon,
> Cackling Goose is seen 1.71 times as often as in any other state. And of
> the residents, Northern Pygmy-Owl appears on 1.60 times as many lists as
> any other state. Honorable mention in the breeding category goes to Vaux's
> Swift (1.73), and to Red-breasted Sapsucker in the resident category (1.47).
>
> Dark-eyed Junco
> Oregon | 32.392
> Washington | 31.344
> Indiana | 25.385
> New Mexico | 24.734
> Missouri | 24.103
> ------
> Oregon lists:Washington lists = 1.03:1
>
> Spotted Towhee
> Oregon | 28.436
> Washington | 27.282
> California | 20.928
> New Mexico | 20.665
> Nevada | 11.513
> -----
> 1.04:1
>
> So Dark-eyed Juncos and Spotted Towhees are reported more often in Oregon
> than in any other states, but they are still quite common in other states,
> so don't seem uniquely Oregonian.
>
> Steller's Jay
> Oregon | 23.274
> Washington | 19.728
> California | 12.399
> Colorado | 9.9287
> Nevada | 9.2062
> ------
> 1.18:1
>
> Oregon's lead over Washington in Steller's Jay report concentration is a
> little larger.
>
> Black-headed Grosbeak
> Oregon | 9.2638
> Arizona | 8.0683
> New Mexico | 7.7892
> Washington | 6.8255
> California | 6.7033
> -----
> 1.15:1
>
> Brown Creeper
> Oregon | 8.169
> Washington | 6.3031
> New Hampshire | 5.9753
> Vermont | 4.9041
> Indiana | 4.454
> ------
> 1.30:1
> The Brown Creeper lead over Washington is larger still.
>
> Cackling Goose
> Oregon | 7.3949
> Kansas | 4.3292
> Alaska | 3.493
> Washington | 3.4408
> Colorado | 3.44
> ------
> 1.71:1
> And the Cackling Goose margin is the largest yet. Of course, they don't
> breed here...
>
> Western Tanager
> Oregon | 7.2922
> Nevada | 6.5454
> Idaho | 6.4213
> New Mexico | 5.9798
> Arizona | 5.9399
> ------
> 1.11:1
>
> Swainson's Thrush
> Oregon | 6.5426
> Washington | 5.4059
> North Dakota | 5.1758
> Montana | 4.7796
> Washington, D.C | 4.7094
> ------
> 1.21:1
>
> Red-breasted Sapsucker
> Oregon | 5.1729
> Washington | 3.5169
> California | 2.5278
> Alaska | 2.3146
> Nevada | 1.2186
> ------
> 1.47:1
>
> Vaux's Swift
> Oregon | 4.7247
> Washington | 2.7276
> Montana | 1.3331
> California | 1.1029
> Idaho | 0.9591
> ------
> 1.73:1
>
> Hermit Warbler
> Oregon | 2.5235
> California | 1.2696
> Arizona | 0.9556
> Nevada | 0.3004
> Washington | 0.1395
> ------
> 1.99:1
>
> Olive-sided Flycatcher
> Oregon | 1.9213
> Washington | 1.7754
> California | 1.6761
> Nevada | 1.4354
> New Mexico | 1.2043
> ------
> 1.08:1
>
> Northern Pygmy-Owl
> Oregon | 0.70303
> Arizona | 0.43926
> Washington | 0.4327
> Idaho | 0.42127
> Montana | 0.38754
> ------
> 1.60:1
>
> That's my approach.
>
> Tait
> Portland
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From:
> <jonathan...>
>
> To:
> <obol...>
> Cc:
>
> Sent:
> Tue, 18 Apr 2017 20:16:33 -0700
> Subject:
> [obol] Re: The most Oregonian bird?
>
>
> PS: I just wanted to add that this is purely an academic question, not a
> political one – nothing to do with our official state bird.
>
>
>
> *From:* Jonathan Ley [mailto:<jonathan...>]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, April 18, 2017 7:31 PM
> *To:* '<obol...>' <obol...>
> *Subject:* The most Oregonian bird?
>
>
>
> Greetings… I’m new to this list, and had a question.
>
>
>
> The recent story about changing the state bird of Oregon got me wondering
> – which bird would be the most “uniquely Oregon”? Ideally, by my measure
> that’d be a bird with a full-year range exactly matching the border of
> Oregon. Since that doesn’t exist, which is the closest to it?
>
>
>
> I was thinking perhaps a Wrentit, or “Oregon” Dark-eyed Junco, maybe
> Red-breasted Sapsucker… White-headed Woodpecker… Anyone have ideas?
>
>
>
> Jonathan Ley
>
> Portland
>
>

 
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