Date: 2/23/17 8:30 am
From: Edward Raynor <edwardraynor...>
Subject: Re: Saw-whet Owls
CT, my home state, does not allow owl postings on the listserve. This
includes all species but keep in mind that the number of birders in CT
dwarf KS. An interesting story that I read on the MA list serve this
winter: During one of the state's birding blitzes/bird-a-thons, an observer
found a Boreal Owl in a lone conifer along the Cape Cod shore. Several
other observers saw the bird and photographed it so intensely that it flew
and was never observed again. That species is found in New England once or
twice every decade...

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 10:23 AM, Laura Kirk <lauraellenkirk...>
wrote:

> Best chance during mating season - unmistakable call - I remember thinking
> there was a truck backing up in the middle of the night near my house ( I
> went outside to investigate), then very luckily it was easy to spot and
> stayed around for a while. I struggled whether to post it because I wanted
> it to stay and nest. This was in CT. where I lived in the woods.
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 9:37 AM, Edward Raynor <edwardraynor...>
> wrote:
>
>> They could probably be breeding in the state, too! Although Nebraska has
>> native coniferous habitat (i.e. Pine Ridge (NW NE), Wildcat Hills (SW NE),
>> and places along the Niobrara River valley (N NE), where they do breed
>> (see
>> links below), it wouldn't be that much of stretch for them breeding in
>> remote, coniferous-infested regions in Kansas.
>>
>> Banding note:
>> http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=21
>> 13&context=nebbirdrev
>>
>> Nesting note:
>> http://magazine.outdoornebraska.gov/2016/04/getting-
>> intimate-saw-whet-owls-nebraska/
>>
>> Nesting note:
>> http://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/blog/2015/09/09/add-nebrask
>> a-to-the-long-list-of-breeding-places-for-saw-whet-owls/
>>
>> Good owling,
>> E.J.
>>
>> On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 8:24 AM, Chuck Otte <cotte...> wrote:
>>
>> > Very simple Jeff - they are easily overlooked. They are small, generally
>> > solitary and do not always respond to recordings. Two things have to
>> happen
>> > - you either totally and completely by luck stumble on to one OR, you go
>> > out
>> > specifically looking for one in a systematic fashion. They are in Kansas
>> > every
>> > single winter - I have no doubt. But they are just too easily missed.
>> >
>> > To be right honest, when I do encounter them, I frequently do not report
>> > them
>> > as it often creates a stampede usually to the detriment of the owl's
>> well
>> > being.
>> >
>> > Chuck
>> >
>> > -----
>> > Chuck Otte <cotte...>
>> > County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
>> > Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28 785-238-4161
>> > Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028 FAX 785-238-7166
>> > http://www.geary.ksu.edu/
>> >
>> > For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>> > https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
>> > For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>> > http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
>> > To contact a listowner, send a message to
>> > mailto:<ksbird-l-request...>
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Edward J. Raynor
>> Lincoln, NE
>> Photo site: www.pbase.com/ether9
>>
>> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbird-l.html
>> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-LGuidelines.htm
>> To contact a listowner, send a message to
>> mailto:<ksbird-l-request...>
>>
>
>


--
Edward J. Raynor
Lincoln, NE
Photo site: www.pbase.com/ether9

For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
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