Date: 10/4/19 8:39 am
From: Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: N Carolina Birder is featured guest on podcasty
Perhaps we should all stay home and give up this hobby altogether? This
short-sighted view ignores the fact that these sorts of goals creates
excitement and interest and in the long run gets more people interested in
and acting towards conservation. The impact of getting more people caring
about birds for the rest of their lives far outweighs some trips someone
takes in the car to see them.

Besides, I thought this was a birding forum, not a conservation forum. I
know there is a deep connection, but if we are to be shamed for actually
birding, then I misunderstood the whole point of subscribing.

Peter Quadarella
Weddington, NC

On Fri, Oct 4, 2019 at 10:39 AM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> You make good points regarding carbon footprints and "travel shaming"
> Steve.
>
> But I think the truth may be somewhere in the middle of your position and
> Mike's. I think listing for the sake of listing and hyper-competitive
> birding are not exactly positive endeavors and they deserve some social
> pushback. I regret being such a gung-ho lister earlier in my life and am
> really glad to be back into the joy of birding for its own sake and not
> giving a damn about listing any more.
>
> I suggest another shaming avenue for folks - giving birders heck who keep
> their swift-capable chimneys capped and inaccessible. If birders won't do
> the right thing on that topic, who will?
>
> Regarding the subject of this thread: I don't agree with Edward's
> characterization of "a quest to see 50% of the species in each of the lower
> 48 U.S. states and D.C." as an "amazing goal".
>
> Terms that leap to my mind about a quest like that are ones like
> ‘pointless’, ‘arbitrary and insipid’, ‘list-obsessed’ and so forth. A
> better quest might be volunteering on conservation projects in each of the
> Lower 48 states and DC. Now that would be an amazing goal.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> --
> flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=do23ERMsHtnXpII0PQD75_cOWmugsdEcLN73SpYeqQo&s=FbU1NnRJCsHz__QTzTB1FJ4NgscLu-p0sZQmLiZipac&e=>
>
>
> "These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
> more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
> shot." -- Bror Blixen
>
> On Fri, Oct 4, 2019 at 9:49 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> But where does the electricity come from to power that EV? Four words:
>> coal, natural gas, nuclear.
>>
>>
>>
>> EVs are great for a number of reasons, but are not necessarily “clean”.
>> It just moves the pollution upstream and out of sight. Sort of like
>> getting the meat wrapped up at the grocery instead of killing the cow.
>>
>>
>>
>> Yes, wind and solar are nice (although they have environmental issues of
>> their own). But for, example, solar to replace coal, we would need to
>> cover an area of the United States equal to about the eastern third of the
>> country with solar panels (the power density of coal is so much higher than
>> solar). And I don’t think we really want to replace all that space with
>> panels.
>>
>>
>>
>> So it’s not simple. And it’s not just about travel. All power
>> generation pollutes or replaces land with infrastructure. Solar might be
>> the cleanest, but it only works during the day, and is very inefficient
>> compared to other sources. Nuclear is probably the next least harmful, but
>> all one has to say is Chernobyl and that discussion screeches to a halt.
>>
>>
>>
>> It’s not easy. And in about 100 years the current discussion won’t
>> matter (coal, natural gas and oil are finite and expected to essentially
>> run out in a blink of time from a geological perspective). Yes, we will be
>> left with the CO2 problems from the present, but will need to still find a
>> way to create the energy needed for civilization (which increases at a
>> significant rate).
>>
>>
>>
>> Don’t get me wrong, I support clean power and the push for
>> environmentally friendly solutions, but pragmatically, publically outing a
>> person for choosing to burn a few gallons of gasoline (or the equivalent in
>> generated electricity) isn’t helping. It’s preaching to the choir.
>>
>>
>>
>> So let’s please stop with the “travel shaming” and “lifestyle shaming” on
>> the mailing list. If you are using the power to type the message, you are
>> using electricity and creating associated environmental impacts. Maybe a
>> few of us are off the grid and producing power with pico-hydro stations,
>> but for the most part, it feels disingenuous to shame folks for driving 2
>> hours while sitting in an air conditioned house.
>>
>>
>>
>> Written from an air conditioned building (it was 100 degrees yesterday
>> for crying out loud!)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Shultz
>>
>> Apex NC
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:
>> <carolinabirds-request...>] *On Behalf Of *Gary Harbour
>> *Sent:* Friday, October 04, 2019 9:27 AM
>> *To:* Mike Judd
>> *Cc:* Edward Pullen; <carolinabirds...>
>> *Subject:* Re: N Carolina Birder is featured guest on podcasty
>>
>>
>> This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links
>> and attachments.
>>
>> Hi Mike, Get an EV then you can 😊 about doing it. Good birding, Gary
>>
>>
>>
>> On Oct 2, 2019, at 10:41 PM, Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> Wonder what his carbon footprint looks like😩.
>>
>> Thinking about running around to taste state & regional pies myself.
>> Surely that would be meaningful, yes? My life list of pies is nearing the
>> magical 700 mark👍
>>
>>
>>
>> Mike Judd
>>
>> Formerly of Brevard
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>> On Oct 2, 2019, at 10:22 PM, Edward Pullen (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Mike Resch, newly relocated to N. Carolina, is the featured guest on the
>> most recent episode of The Bird Banter Podcast. Mike has a quest to see
>> 50% of the species in each of the lower 48 U.S. states and D.C. He is only
>> 2 states from accomplishing this amazing goal, and talks about it on this
>> episode.
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdbanter.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HOhl44u2PIT8KraPDj81kYBx2PkstqXK3sFDcgr8Dow&s=eueqH-H2LaMecw4cX7CLdw3p6qk7jMa3AuMX-w4z3TA&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdbanter.com_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hEEH6gLrVrIbos5QJ2GY8ENFPHjWrmtoy13S8FxsF68&s=BmGNBcviQMJOU7Ktii9UiCGsw8A5IRMY4NCBwbe8B_g&e=>
>>
>>
>>
>> You can listent on the BIrd Banter site, or get the episode on Apple
>> Podcasts, Stitcher or Spotify. Links on the signature block below.
>>
>>
>>
>> Ed
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Ed Pullen
>>
>> Follow The Bird Banter Podcast on iTunes
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__podcasts.apple.com_us_podcast_bird-2Dbanter_id1450449001&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hEEH6gLrVrIbos5QJ2GY8ENFPHjWrmtoy13S8FxsF68&s=S1KnpcYRaaCFTKMUW9harKudVrlWHW7A6XVGSKOL938&e=>
>> or the podcast feed of your choice
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdbanter.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hEEH6gLrVrIbos5QJ2GY8ENFPHjWrmtoy13S8FxsF68&s=tA88K6LZo5pLhZag9pfQY1oFL6nXKf2IURHUrK8KL4g&e=>
>> .
>>
>>
>>
>
>

 
Join us on Facebook!