Date: 9/9/19 9:02 am
From: Eric DeFonso <bay.wren...>
Subject: Re: [cobirds] Re: Ani still here
Although I didn't see as much of the bird's behavior yesterday afternoon as
I'd have liked (due to inclement weather), I didn't see anything that was
inconsistent with general wild ani behavior that I've encountered in my
travels in tropical locales.

To illustrate the sociality of anis (genus Crotophaga), GBAN is one of the
few bird species in the world that are communal nesters, meaning that
sometimes multiple females will share a single joint nest with as many as
20 eggs contained therein. Also, the Groove-billeds I've seen in Costa Rica
would hang out around hotels, and afforded several photo opportunities.
I've photographed Smooth-billeds in a few tropical locales along roadsides
too, in Puerto Rico, Ecuador, and Brazil.

Over the several months I spent in southeastern Brazil I also became fairly
familiar with its congener the Greater Ani (Crotophaga major). Greater Ani
is also highly social, and although not necessarily fearless of humans nor
is it terribly shy, and Greater Ani sometimes even engages in lengthy group
chorus episodes where 3-6 individuals in a group will make a continuous
gurgling cackle that can go on uninterrupted for several minutes. I
actually got to see this a couple times, and it was quite a treat.

The point being, this bird's casual behavior around people doesn't seem to
me to be an argument for prior captivity. It seemed like a typical ani to
me. And I've never even heard of anis as being desired cage birds.

Eric

-------
Eric DeFonso
near Lyons, Boulder County, CO

On Mon, Sep 9, 2019 at 9:03 AM Patrick O'Driscoll <patodrisk...>
wrote:

> I agree with Rachel. Purely anecdotally and FWIW, I see the species every
> January when spending a week or two in Puerto Vallarta.
> The birds around Isla Cuale, the stream that flows through the heart of
> town, don't exactly beg for handouts.
> But they do freely wander the island and its thickets within a few feet of
> the stalls of vendors selling tourist items and food.
> And yes, the ones I encounter are approachable. They are also rather
> s-l-o-w and unhurried.
>
> Patrick O'Driscoll
> Denver
>
>
>
> On Mon, Sep 9, 2019 at 8:56 AM Rachel Kolokoff Hopper <
> <r-hopper...> wrote:
>
>> Hi COBirders,
>>
>> I am not commenting on whether or not this is a wild bird, but I will say
>> that my experience with Groove-billed Ani, which I see and photograph
>> annually in Mexico, is that they are highly social and gregarious birds.
>> When they are not foraging and moving through a particular habitat in a
>> group, I am usually able to get quite close to them for photos.
>> ------------------------------
>> Rachel Hopper
>> rkhphotography.net
>> <r-hopper...>
>> Ft. Collins, CO
>>
>> On Sep 9, 2019, at 8:45 AM, Adam Vesely <avesely22...> wrote:
>>
>> Alison, great question, several of us were talking about that very thing
>> yesterday. I'd be curious to get thoughts on this bird being seemingly very
>> comfortable so close to humans from those that have observed this species
>> in Texas and Central/South America. Is that type of cooperation typical for
>> this species in the "wild?"
>>
>> Adam Vesely
>> Thornton, CO
>>
>> On Monday, September 9, 2019 at 8:09:03 AM UTC-6, Alison Kondler wrote:
>>>
>>> Got great views of the Ani just now. Could this be an escaped bird? It
>>> flew up to many of us as if waiting for a hand out. At one point five of us
>>> were about eight feet away from it for about 6 minutes or so.
>>>
>>> Alison Kondler
>>> Jefferson County
>>>
>>
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "Colorado Birds" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to cobirds+<unsubscribe...>
>> To view this discussion on the web visit
>> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/<ccf59ab7-9ac5-4860-a39d-d2ac5b0d2d35...>
>> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/<ccf59ab7-9ac5-4860-a39d-d2ac5b0d2d35...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>>
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "Colorado Birds" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to cobirds+<unsubscribe...>
>> To view this discussion on the web visit
>> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/<D7C2A2BD-95EE-4C86-A87E-120FE7515CEC...>
>> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/<D7C2A2BD-95EE-4C86-A87E-120FE7515CEC...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Colorado Birds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to cobirds+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAMNEzJNWATJcd4ieS%2BvSh%3D53M%3DSNpnt_YkK2gEYRK6%<3DQePQdQA...>
> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/CAMNEzJNWATJcd4ieS%2BvSh%3D53M%3DSNpnt_YkK2gEYRK6%<3DQePQdQA...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Colorado Birds" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to cobirds+<unsubscribe...>
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cobirds/<CAFjVA_bDgxwnq3FQTbdEkZp7_WMk1_eu03tU_iRi_iZ-v4BZAQ...>

 
Join us on Facebook!