Date: 6/20/19 10:14 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Jay Question
*Well, it ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble, it's what
you do know but ain't so...* to quote a sage OBOLer
Attached is a collage I posted to OBOL a couple of years ago. The
slightly-edited accompanying email is below.
These photos were taken in Caruthers Canyon in the Mohave Nation Preserve
east of Death Valley, California; which I _believe_ is an
accepted 'westernmost' population of Woodhouse Jay. Certainly well
isolated ecologically from western populations.
Note the strong white supercilium, fairly strong necklace, and apparent
white undertail coverts.

Now, as for me, I don't really profess to _know_ what these birds or the
Oregon birds are but as noted below, the Caruthers birds' behavior fit the
reputed Woodhouse profile quite well.

I wonder if we _may_ be getting into a Western Flycatcher type conundrum
.........................?

Bob OBrien Carver OR
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My California brother had visited Caruthers Canyon in the Death Valley
National Preserve
about 20 years ago and had noticed the Jays were 'different'. Different
calls, shyer.
Subsequently they were split. Last January we decided to check them out.

So we combined a trip for desert wildflowers with a scrub-jay-foray in
April. This dry, beautiful, rocky
canyon is characterized by several oaks and the interesting & unique
Single-leaf Pinyon Pine.

Here's what we found. They do indeed sound differently and are much shyer
than their western cousins.
We saw no evidence they hung out around the campers and their potential
handouts or scraps;
and they were not easy to photograph. We saw several pairs flying across
the flat Pygmy Joshua Tree desert
on our way to the canyon and their 'azure' blue coloration appeared quite
different than the coastal jays.
(Actually, I have no idea what azure means in this context but the color
was striking, perhaps 'softer' in bright sunlight.)

Still they are absolutely not lacking in personality.


On Tue, Jun 11, 2019 at 10:47 AM Tom Crabtree <tc...> wrote:

> I would call it a California. Woodhouse’s should have blue undertail
> coverts, a black ear patch, no “necklace in front and an indistinct
> supercilium. Your bird has white undertail coverts, a gray ear patch, a
> partial necklace and a noticeable supercillium. It looks similar to the
> Scrub Jays we get in Bend, which are distinctly duller than the ones found
> on the west side.
>
>
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
>
>
> *From:* <obol-bounce...> [mailto:<obol-bounce...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Sally Hill
> *Sent:* Sunday, June 09, 2019 12:43 PM
> *To:* OBOL
> *Subject:* [obol] Jay Question
>
>
>
> Vickie Buck and I recently returned from trip to Malheur County where we
> saw and Vickie got some photos of this jay. The bird was seen in little
> park in town of Brogan.
>
> This is not typical of the California Scrub Jays that we see on the West
> side of Oregon.
>
> It had a gray back and a limited necklace that was almost the same color
> as the back. Indistinct supercilium. The under parts are very pale. We
> initially thought California but now not so sure.
>
> I sent these photos to a guide that leads trips in Arizona he said he
> leaned towards Woodhouse's but could not necessarily eliminate hybrid,
> California x Woodhouse's. thoughts?
>
> * IMG_3241.JPG
> <https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9ik1Gl-Ej6_QlplTC04OWUwVWQwRmpKb2c3YW8zRm1yZHBv/view?usp=drive_web>*
>
>
>
> * IMG_3243.JPG
> <https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9ik1Gl-Ej6_WDBsUVpqSmRaSDAxdThZdTlrMWZhMUh4VFVv/view?usp=drive_web>*
>
>
>
> * IMG_3242.JPG
> <https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9ik1Gl-Ej6_X1NPM1VTVmNNM2g2b1VDbzVxYmdsUF80d3Fr/view?usp=drive_web>*
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sally Hill
>
> Eugene Oregon
>
>
>

 
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