Date: 5/21/19 9:07 am
From: Pam Hunt <biodiva...>
Subject: Re: [NHBirds] Bay-breasted warblers, etc, Epping




All,

There is a huge budworm outbreak in southern Quebec that's been going on for a little over a decade now, and has started to expand south into New Brunswick and Maine (https://www.sprucebudwormmaine.org/map/). It is almost certainly the source of the slow but steady increase in the "budworm warblers" on migration in the last 5-8 years here in NH. I wouldn't be terribly surprised if local breeding populations in Coos County also increase - especially if the budworm gets to NH...
&nbsp;
Pam Hunt
Penacook

On Tue, 21 May 2019 12:01:54 -0400, Stephen Mirick wrote:

It seems to me that Bay-breasted, Cape Mays, and Tennessees have been relatively common the last few years.&nbsp; I know others report them more regularly inland, but I still rarely see them along the seacoast.&nbsp; Even on the seacoast, however, I'm seeing more of them.&nbsp; I remember back in my second year of birding in 1982 seeing lots of Cape Mays on Appledore Island when I took a class out there.&nbsp; They were everywhere!&nbsp; I thought they would be like that every year.&nbsp; But alas, they just disappeared.&nbsp; There were many years, that I never recorded Cape Mays.&nbsp; Now the numbers seem to be going up again.

These three species are spruce budworm specialists and their populations explode with outbreaks of the Eastern Spruce Budworm.&nbsp; I suspect there is an outbreak somewhere to our north!

According to wikipedia:
&nbsp;
&nbsp;In 20th-century eastern Canada, the major outbreaks occurred in periods circa 1910–20, c. 1940–50, and c. 1970–80. (reportedly 1974-1982 in northern New England). These outbreaks impacted, respectively, 10, 25, and 57 million hectares of forest. Longer-term tree-ring studies suggest that spruce budworm outbreaks have been recurring approximately every three decades since the 16th century. Paleoecological studies suggest the spruce budworm has been breaking out in eastern North America for thousands of years.

............Steve



&nbsp;
On 5/21/2019 11:37 AM, Greg Tillman wrote:


A little further down Mast Rd, I had two BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS, males, on the Birch Rd trail on the south side of mast rd, and another one on the Scout trail north of mast rd. Seems like this species has picked up some in recent years?

-Greg
Epping




&nbsp;

&nbsp;
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