Date: 5/18/19 12:16 pm
From: Gail Mackiernan <katahdinss...>
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] A travel alert to parts of the Eastern Shore
Maybe we should all wear zebra-striped clothing - like football refereeā€™s shirts. Recent research showed biting flies far less apt to land on a striped coat than a unicolored one. The results were highly significant. Apparently reason zebras are striped.

Of course I am not sure that would be all that good for birding...maybe a bit conspicuous!

Gail Mackiernan
Colesville

Sent from my iPad

> On May 18, 2019, at 1:58 PM, Steve Long <steve.long4...> wrote:
>
> My strategy for dealing with deer flies is as follows: Take advantage of their preference for lighting high on their "prey" by removing a glove or opening s shirt sleeve and holding your arm up a little, then, when they light there, be ready to take advantage of their slow (for flies) reflexes and swat them with your other hand. This eliminates THAT fly from the equation, but needs to be repeated for each fly as it starts buzzing you. Just waving at them usually results in a whole swarm of flies building up in the air around you, and one will get in a bite while you are trying to deal with another one. BTW, I have often seen swatted deer flies drop onto a road or sidewalk, then recover and fly away. So, I make sure that I grind them with my foot while they are down to make sure they NEVER get up again.
>
> Steve Long, Oxford
>
>> On 5/18/2019 1:34 PM, JimC wrote:
>> Ticks are a constant, but we off the Nanticoke, and perhaps elsewhere, have something more bothersome this time of year: Deer Flies. Ticks are manageable because of their small numbers and specific locations, these are not. There are no chemical deterrents. They are quite carnivorous but their saliva's (word?) itching does not last as long as a tick's.
>>
>> The from-here's call them 'May Flies'. They live by the calendar. That is the good news, they typically burn themselves out in about 6 weeks. Deer Flies appear to have a simple regulator that makes a workaround possible; their aggression is temperature dependent. I can work outside if the temps are in the lower 70's and shady. If either the temp rises into the mid-70s and/or the Sun comes out, rather than simply buzz and circle, they come for blood. It seems they need your body temperature elevated to trigger their biting. (a windy day helps keep your body temp lower)
>>
>> Beekeeper's hats are good, but the typical, drapy bug shirt is not. They bite thru thin cotton and any mesh that is in contact with skin.
>>
>> Jim - across from Nutters Neck WMA
>>
>
> --
> -- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'. To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
> Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
> --- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Maryland & DC Birding" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mdbirding+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mdbirding/<147b71d5-0667-a41f-699f-ab92c5b452c8...>

--
-- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Group 'Maryland & DC Birding'.
To view group guidelines or change email preferences, visit this group on the web at http://www.mdbirding.com
Unfamiliar with a hotspot mentioned on this list? Quickly locate it here - http://www.mdbirding.com/hotspot.html
---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Maryland & DC Birding" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mdbirding+<unsubscribe...>
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mdbirding/<C0D15293-3FF3-4317-8E6C-10BBF23F140D...>
 
Join us on Facebook!