Date: 5/10/19 11:16 am
From: Kate Saunders <katefsaunders...>
Subject: [obol] Re: obol Digest V8 #137
This morning Ger and I spotted two American Pipits on the beach in
Neskowin, the first I've ever seen right on the beach. They were working
the high tide line, possibly picking at the large hatch of a winged
ant-like insect that happened the day before and had littered the beach.
Also present were 6 whimbrels, who've been there for at least a couple of
weeks. The flock of Surfbirds still hanging out on Proposal Rock.

On Thu, May 9, 2019 at 10:07 PM <obol...> wrote:

> obol Digest Thursday, May 09 2019 Volume: 08 Issue: 137
>
> In This Issue:
> #1: From: <jonathan...>
> Subject: [obol] Bitterns in the open
> #2: From: Donald Burns <burnsdacey...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Bitterns in the open
> #3: From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6...>
> Subject: [obol] RBA: Portland, OR 5-9-19
> #4: From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
> Subject: [obol] hurts my heart, too, and lengthy posts
> #5: From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk...>
> Subject: [obol] East Winds- Coos Migrants 5/9/19
> #6: From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
> Subject: [obol] Black Swift over Clatsop Co.
> #7: From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Subject: [obol] Malheur Indigo?
> #8: From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
> Subject: [obol] This morning on Coxcomb Hill - 5/9/2019
> #9: From: John Thomas <johnpam...>
> Subject: [obol] Wednesday Shorebirds In Lincoln
> County-Late Report
> #10: From: Erick Shore <falconpdx...>
> Subject: [obol] Have you heard this bird?
> #11: From: Scott O'Donnell <scott...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Happy Trails
> #12: From: Christopher Armstrong <chrisleearmstrong...>
> Subject: [obol] Common ostrich reported at Portland
> Audobon center
> #13: From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Subject: [obol] RBA Tennessee hq
> #14: From: Jack Maynard <jmaynard...>
> Subject: [obol] Eastern Phoebe yes
> #15: From: Jack Maynard <jmaynard...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Eastern Phoebe yes
> #16: From: =?UTF-8?Q?Jos=C3=A9e_Rousseau?= <
> <josee.rousseau...>
> Subject: [obol] Corvallis Bioblitz - Sunday, May 19 -
> Peavy Arboretum
> #17: From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc...>
> Subject: [obol] major passerine flight Immonen Rd clear cut
> #18: From: <clearwater...>
> Subject: [obol] This curious phenomenon called OBOL
> #19: From: <clearwater...>
> Subject: [obol] Late-ish Merlin in Soap Creek Valley north
> of Corvall
> #20: From: "dawn v" <d_villa...>
> Subject: [obol] Off-topic - Tillamook Birder website
> #21: From: Mary Garrard <springazure1...>
> Subject: [obol] Pilot Truck Stop exit update (I-5 exit 263)
> #22: From: Mary Garrard <springazure1...>
> Subject: [obol] Clarification
> #23: From: Treesa Hertzel <autumn207...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Clarification
> #24: From: Mary Garrard <springazure1...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Clarification
> #25: From: Russ Namitz <namitzr...>
> Subject: [obol] OBA Princess Cruise field trip report
> 5/4-5/6
> #26: From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
> Subject: [obol] Another cavity nester quiz
> #27: From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Subject: [obol] Malheur update
> #28: From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk...>
> Subject: [obol] South Coast East Wind Extravaganza 5/9/19
> #29: From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Subject: [obol] wind
> #30: From: <clearwater...>
> Subject: [obol] A little more historical perspective
> #31: From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
> Subject: [obol] Finley NWR Trumpeter Swans, Wilson's
> Phalarope, etc.
> #32: From: "Kay Carter" <KayCarter...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Have you heard this bird?
> #33: From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Have you heard this bird?
> #34: From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
> Subject: [obol] Birding Cruise Highlights (May 8)
> #35: From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
> Subject: [obol] Birding Cruise Highlights (May 8)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Msg: #1 in digest
> From: <jonathan...>
> Subject: [obol] Bitterns in the open
> Date: Wed, 8 May 2019 22:40:05 -0700
>
> About 10 days ago, we had a pair of very friendly Bitterns at Steigerwald
> Lake. The male was showing off, and I got these photos
> http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-6.jpg
>
> http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-2.jpg
>
> http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-1.jpg
>
> The last photo helped me understand why they stand with their bills
> skyward.
> They have stereo vision looking downward, so with their bill in the air,
> they can look forward. Plus, it's good camouflage. It was actually a bit
> too
> close - I had to back up to fit it in the camera frame. There were 5-6
> people there. The Bitterns were only about 10 yards off the main path.
>
>
>
> It wasn't especially early either - like 9-10am or so. Never had an
> encounter like this previously. I think it's just a matter of luck.
>
>
>
> -Jonathan
>
>
>
>
>
> Msg: #9 in digest
>
> From: Rebecca Hartman <rhartman...> <mailto:<rhartman...> >
>
> Date: Wed, 8 May 2019 09:38:41 -0700
>
> Subject: [obol] Bittern in the open
>
>
>
> I'm curious to learn how common it is for Bitterns to be in the open, and
> why they might be.
>
> I took a friend to Fernridge yesterday afternoon and as we walked west on
> the Royal path we saw a bird on the side of the path just past the turn to
> the platform. It appeared to be a Bittern in typical vertical head pose.
>
> Not convinced that light and angle might not be making a GBH into a
> Bittern,
> we crept forward as slowly as possible. It was clearly a Bittern and it did
> eventually fly, fully confirming for me. I was initially more skeptical
> than
> my companion, because I've never encountered a Bittern in the open like
> that.
>
> Thanks in advance for any illumination on this.
>
> Rebecca
>
> Eugene
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #2 in digest
> From: Donald Burns <burnsdacey...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Bitterns in the open
> Date: Wed, 8 May 2019 23:14:15 -0700
>
> with his white angel wings showing out from under his wings. The second
> photo is the female. The third photo looks like the male fluffed up in his
> mating excitement.
>
>
> > On May 8, 2019, at 10:40 PM, <jonathan...> <jonathan...>
> wrote:
> >
> > About 10 days ago, we had a pair of very friendly Bitterns at
> Steigerwald Lake. The male was showing off, and I got these photos
> > http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-6.jpg <
> http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-6.jpg>
> > http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-2.jpg <
> http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-2.jpg>
> > http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-1.jpg <
> http://www.phlumf.com/temp/American-Bittern-1.jpg>
> > The last photo helped me understand why they stand with their bills
> skyward. They have stereo vision looking downward, so with their bill in
> the air, they can look forward. Plus, it’s good camouflage. It was actually
> a bit too close - I had to back up to fit it in the camera frame. There
> were 5-6 people there. The Bitterns were only about 10 yards off the main
> path.
> >
> > It wasn’t especially early either – like 9-10am or so. Never had an
> encounter like this previously… I think it’s just a matter of luck.
> >
> > -Jonathan
> >
> >
> > Msg: #9 in digest
> > From: Rebecca Hartman <rhartman...> <mailto:<rhartman...>>
> > Date: Wed, 8 May 2019 09:38:41 -0700
> > Subject: [obol] Bittern in the open
> >
> > I'm curious to learn how common it is for Bitterns to be in the open,
> and why they might be.
> > I took a friend to Fernridge yesterday afternoon and as we walked west
> on the Royal path we saw a bird on the side of the path just past the turn
> to the platform. It appeared to be a Bittern in typical vertical head pose.
> > Not convinced that light and angle might not be making a GBH into a
> Bittern, we crept forward as slowly as possible. It was clearly a Bittern
> and it did eventually fly, fully confirming for me. I was initially more
> skeptical than my companion, because I've never encountered a Bittern in
> the open like that.
> > Thanks in advance for any illumination on this.
> > Rebecca
> > Eugene
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #3 in digest
> Date: Wed, 08 May 2019 23:58:01 -0700
> Subject: [obol] RBA: Portland, OR 5-9-19
> From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6...>
>
> - RBA
> * Oregon
> * Portland
> * May 8, 2019
> * ORPO1905.19
> - birds mentioned
>
> TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE
> Calliope Hummingbird
> Red Knot
> Semipalmated Sandpiper
> MURPHY¹S PETREL
> Warbling Vireo
> Swainson¹s Thrush
> Brewer¹s Sparrow
> HOODED ORIOLE
> Bullock¹s Oriole
> GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE
> Western Tanager
> Black-headed Grosbeak
>
> - transcript
>
> hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
> number: 503-233-3976
> To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976 <hnehls6...>
> compiler: Harry Nehls
> coverage: entire state
>
> Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This
> report
> was made Thursday May 9. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls at
> 503-233-3976.
>
> A TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE was reported during the week at the Crooked River
> Wetlands south of Madras. Two MURPHY¹S PETRELS were off Oregon May 2. On
> May
> 7 a singing EASTERN PHOEBE was along Oak Island Road on Sauvie Island. A
> HOODED ORIOLE was photographed in Brookings May 1. On May 6 a GREAT-TAILED
> GRACKLE was photographed along State Line Road at Lower Klamath NWR.
>
> Heavy shorebird movements were reported during the week along the coast
> with
> above normal RED KNOTS reported. On May 6 a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER was
> photographed north of Waldport.
>
> Peak numbers of migrants passed through Oregon during the week bringing
> good
> numbers of BLACK-HEAD GROSBEAKS, BULLOCK¹S ORIOLES, WESTERN TANAGERS, and
> SWAINSON¹S THRUSHES.
>
> A BREWER¹S SPARROW was reported May 7 at Powell Butte Park in Portland. A
> HARRIS¹S SPARROW was at the Tualatin NWR that day. On May 3 up to 18
> WARBLING VIREOS were at the Cammasia Natural Area in West Linn. A CALLIOPE
> HUMMINGBIRD was at a McMinnville feeder May 5.
>
> Malheur NWR is now picking up with many migrants, especially warblers at
> Headquarters.
>
> That¹s it for this week.
>
> - end transcript
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #4 in digest
> From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
> Subject: [obol] hurts my heart, too, and lengthy posts
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 04:57:00 -0700
>
> Mary and Mary,
>
> It hurts my heart, too, to see snarky personal jabs on OBOL. And I'm not
> a big fan of long-winded bird-nerd techy posts, either.
>
> I started life aiming to be a priest, a pastoral role. The whole culture
> was aimed at service to others and leading them to connection with higher
> things. It was not about oneself. That was followed by a graduate program
> as a research scientist. That was about protocol and attention to detail.
> Those two threads are still in my life. The former leads me to want to
> help others see and appreciate birds and nature in general. The latter
> leads me to collect data.
>
> When I came to birding, it was with a group of little old ladies in tennis
> shoes who were not driven by testosterone to be birding hotshots, but
> rather to make sure everyone saw all the birds. For the first 20 years of
> my birding life, I pursued birds with congenial people. If I ran into a
> big ego in the field, I could excuse myself and move away.
>
> Here in Oregon we had a network of people who were on the bird-alert list
> to go see rare birds. We met personally in the field and were cordial. We
> wrote up our finds in Oregon Birds magazine and celebrated the people who
> contributed to the community.
>
> The second 20 years of my birding life have been different.
>
> We got the internet and people who weren't driven to go SEE the rare
> birds, came on line to DISCUSS birds. People whose day job was not
> ornithology showed off great knowledge of ornithological detail. People
> argued. Voices got testy. People will say things online that they would
> never say to one's face.
>
> OBOL is a general forum with 1400 subscribers, yet a large volume of the
> content is driven by a few voices. I believe is should be a forum for
> sightings, not arguments. I don't think the vast majority of subscribers
> want to see or hear testy arguments. I think those should have an outlet,
> but it should be somewhere else.
>
> While a slice of Oregon birders have moved on to eBird as their place to
> get bird sightings, there are still a good slice of us who do not find that
> avenue useful. I want OBOL to continue to be the forum where people can
> share bird sightings, directions, and updates as we pursue --and help
> others pursue -- the birds we love.
>
> Good birding, everyone,
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> --------------------------
> Subject: Ebird tutorial and lengthy posts
> Date: Wed May 8 2019 10:37 am
> From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
>
> ...
>
> Also, I'm intimidated by these long-winded bird-nerd techy posts and the
> overwhelming number of them. Never see that on Tweeters or frankly any
> other list I'm on. It would be nice if there was another list for these
> kind of conversations and just a friendly regular OBOL for bird sightings.
>
> Venting complete. :-)
>
> Mary M. Reese
> -------------------------
>
> Subject: hurts my heart
> Date: Wed May 8 2019 1:14 am
> From: springazure1 AT gmail.com
>
> Hi friends, I got caught up with OBOL posts tonight, and I have to say it
> really hurts my heart when discussions include snarky personal jabs (the
> latest example being the discussion about using X instead of estimating
> numbers on eBird lists). Perhaps I misread people's intent, because it's
> notoriously easy to misinterpret electronic communications without
> accompanying body language and other visual or aural cues, but really. Be
> nice. We are all on the same page when it comes to the big picture of
> loving and appreciating the amazing world of birds and the need to ensure
> their survival in the world we humans have created. Right?
>
> ...
>
> I do love and appreciate all the ways in which OBOL�ers lift up and
> advance the cause of birds and birding.
>
> Mary Garrard
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #5 in digest
> From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 05:27:55 -0700
> Subject: [obol] East Winds- Coos Migrants 5/9/19
>
> With offshore East Winds forecasted the next couple of days it will be a
> good time to find unusual species along the coast. Forecast is close to 80F
> for Coos Bay but only 70s on the Curry coast where I will be today so it
> may not be as strong a coastal push as in some years. A few years back on a
> good east wind day in early May at N Spit Coos Bay (one where it hit 90F) I
> saw a Black Tern, two Sandhill Cranes and a Bank Swallow. I have seen chats
> on the beach also.
> Early this morning I heard Swainson’s Thrushes calling as they migrated
> over. They have been back for a few days now but numbers will probably
> rapidly increase the next few days.
>
> Merry migration!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #6 in digest
> From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
> Subject: [obol] Black Swift over Clatsop Co.
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 05:49:08 -0700
>
> Yesterday, while visiting the North Coast Wildlife Center, I noted
> a single, very high flying BLACK SWIFT with VAUX'S SWIFTS. It did not
> linger (though the small ones did). Weather conditions this more
> could produced some other interesting migrant action.
>
> I'll be on Coxcomb Hill, if you need me...
>
> --
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Bald Eagles - a gateway bird
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=3709
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #7 in digest
> From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 08:01:57 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Malheur Indigo?
>
> Report of all-blue bunting at HQ yesterday
>
> Alan Contreras
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> Temporary address:
> Malheur NWR
> 36391 Sodhouse Ln
> Princeton OR 97721
>
> <acontrer56...>
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #8 in digest
> From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
> Subject: [obol] This morning on Coxcomb Hill - 5/9/2019
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 08:22:23 -0700
>
> Moderate migration traffic up bright sunny skies and winds mostly
> from the north. Best birds of the morning were a pair of LAZULI
> BUNTINGS. Also, various expected warbler species, maybe a dozen
> WESTERN TANAGERS, a BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK.
>
> NO flycatchers.
>
> --
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Bald Eagles - a gateway bird
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=3709
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #9 in digest
> From: John Thomas <johnpam...>
> Subject: [obol] Wednesday Shorebirds In Lincoln County-Late Report
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 08:25:04 -0700
>
> This is what Wes C. and I saw during a brief mid-day visit Wednesday:
> Yaquina Bay State Park
>
> Whimbrel 120
> Marbled Godwit 1
> Semi-palm Plover 10
> Dunlin 25
> Sanderling 8
> Black-bellied Plover 2
> Red-necked Phalarope 24
>
> South Beach State Park
>
> RED KNOT 1
> Whimbrel 20
>
> Seal Rock State Park
>
> 15 Whimbrel
>
> ~ In other news, we saw 3 Caspian Terns by the North Jetty of Yaquina
> Bay. Peregrine Falcons now have young at Yaquina Head. Nice views of the
> male and only brief peaks of the female sitting on the young. Over 10,000
> very vocal Common Murres were in the water and moving onto the rocks by the
> lighthouse …along with many Pelagic and Brandt’s Comorants.
>
> Good Birding,
> John Thomas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #10 in digest
> From: Erick Shore <falconpdx...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 08:33:44 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Have you heard this bird?
>
> Hello birders,
> Here's a link to a video that has an unusual song for the species of bird
> making it. Of all the recordings I've heard on the internet of song
> variations within the species I haven't heard one like this at all. I would
> love to hear from some of you more experienced birders what you think of
> this and whether you have heard this species singing this song before? I
> uploaded the videos to be private on YouTube but anyone with the link can
> view them.
>
> The first link recorded the song really well, but you can't see the bird on
> purpose, it's a test :-). If you click "show more" in the video description
> section I put the species there.
>
> https://youtu.be/Uv2QSBEeYns
>
> This second link is to the video that shows the bird. Hopefully you can
> confirm my ID even with the bad video quality.
>
> https://youtu.be/h2X6DzeKYec
>
> Happy birding!
>
> Erick Shore
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #11 in digest
> Date: Thu, 09 May 2019 09:07:37 -0700
> From: Scott O'Donnell <scott...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Happy Trails
>
> Dear Mr. Irons,
>
> If the universe isn't trying to tell you something, I will.
>
> You don't know me, but we met briefly in Tillamook while watching the
> Dickcissel earlier this year. I'm not new to being passionate about
> birds or birding, but I am only a few years new to ebird and the social
> aspects of birding (obol, etc.). In that time my knowledge, passion, and
> experiences (not to mention my life list), have grown to levels I never
> even knew existed. I have you and many other of the good folks of obol
> to thank for that.
>
> I love ebird and I use it for most of, if not all, the reasons that have
> been mentioned - personal record keeping, the competitive spirit (in a
> playfully amusing way), as a learning resource, and most of all it makes
> me feel good about being part of a citizen science project. For that
> last part, it is very important to me that my reports to ebird will be
> useful.
>
> In other words, I've been hearing you brother!
>
> Thank you very much for your time, thoughts, opinions, and advice, that
> you've so selfishly shared here on obol. I, for one, hope that you
> reconsider.
>
> (maybe you already have, that Petrel challenge proved irresistible bait)
> :)
>
> Good birding to you sir.
>
> Cheers!
>
> Scott O'Donnell
>
> Troy, Wallowa County
>
> Message sent from "The Bird Aquarium".
>
> On 2019-05-08 14:46, David Irons wrote:
> > Greetings all,
> >
> > I’ve been an on and off and on again participant in this forum for
> > roughly twenty years. It has been mostly a value added experience and
> > I would hope that my participation has been ledger positive overall.
> >
> > Over recent years my inclination to say what I think and offer
> > opinions that the majority of subscribers may not agree with has
> > evoked more grief and bad feelings than meaningful discussion and
> > healthy disagreement. It has become increasingly abundant that my
> > personality does not play well in a forum like OBOL. For this reason
> > I’ve decided to give OBOL a break and likely a permanent one.
> >
> > I know that some of you value my thoughts on tricky bird ID’s,
> > historical perspective on status and distribution, or have eBird
> > questions. Feel free to contact me directly via email and I will
> > happily respond to those and other birding questions. And if you are
> > in the Portland area and want to go birding I am always up for that
> > (work schedule permitting). You are likely to discover I am infinitely
> > more fun in person than some in this forum think I am.
> >
> > I hope for the sake of those who subscribe to this forum that it
> > continues to provide you enjoyment and perhaps some alternate
> > perspectives to consider.
> >
> > Dave Irons
> >
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone<�I��ʋ���-�� �W�y�b��(
> > N
> > ӑAB ��i��0���zX���+��b���n�N �ڭ�b��0� �y�b��(�
> ڭ�b���n�B�{Zr٨u�ڶ��n�f�׫j�+���zX���+
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #12 in digest
> From: Christopher Armstrong <chrisleearmstrong...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:57 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Common ostrich reported at Portland Audobon center
>
> Hi all,
>
> I just noticed this ebird report this morning. It says that yesterday a
> common ostrich was seen at the Portland Audobon Society. I assume this is
> an honest mistake?
>
>
> Chris Armstrong, Beaverton
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #13 in digest
> From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 09:38:07 -0700
> Subject: [obol] RBA Tennessee hq
>
> Singing male Tennessee Warbler at HQ this morning. Pics and voice
> recording.
>
> Long-eared Owl at HQ yesterday. Photos. I missed it.
>
> Alan Contreras
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> Temporary address:
> Malheur NWR
> 36391 Sodhouse Ln
> Princeton OR 97721
>
> <acontrer56...>
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #14 in digest
> From: Jack Maynard <jmaynard...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 09:41:29 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Eastern Phoebe yes
>
> Eastern Phoebe right now at the left corner of the green barn at the
> corner at Oak Island Road. Singing it’s heart out.
> Thanks Colby and others.
>
> Just saw it go inside the barn at the broken left bottom corner. I wonder
> if it’s making a nest in there?
>
> Jack Maynard.
> 9:40 am
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #15 in digest
> From: Jack Maynard <jmaynard...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 09:45:46 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Re: Eastern Phoebe yes
>
> Clarification:
> The far green barn from road. There is a damaged area just under the rusty
> light post that comes up out of barn, visible without crossing closed gate.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 9, 2019, at 9:41 AM, Jack Maynard <jmaynard...> wrote:
> >
> > Eastern Phoebe right now at the left corner of the green barn at the
> corner at Oak Island Road. Singing it’s heart out.
> > Thanks Colby and others.
> >
> > Just saw it go inside the barn at the broken left bottom corner. I
> wonder if it’s making a nest in there?
> >
> > Jack Maynard.
> > 9:40 am
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> >
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #16 in digest
> From: =?UTF-8?Q?Jos=C3=A9e_Rousseau?= <josee.rousseau...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 10:44:31 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Corvallis Bioblitz - Sunday, May 19 - Peavy Arboretum
>
> Join us for the 3rd Corvallis BioBlitz, at the Firefighter Memorial Shelter
> in Peavy Arboretum on Sunday, May 19th. Our goal is to record as many
> species as possible while enjoying outdoor spaces! This is a free,
> educational, family-friendly event. All ages are welcome! No prior
> experience needed!
> While we will have scientists and naturalists present on site to help the
> public identify species between 10 am to 4 pm, we will consider all species
> identified on the site within a period of 24 hours (4 pm May 18 to 4 pm May
> 19). *All bird species entered in iNaturalist and/or eBird will be
> included in our list of species. *
>
> Various themed walks and a bird banding-birding activity are available.
> For more information or to pre-register for the bird banding and birding
> event, visit https://corvallisbioblitz.wordpress.com/bioblitz-2019/or
> contact us at <corvallisbioblitz...>
>
> Check our Facebook
> <https://www.facebook.com/events/456973958180457/?active_tabout> for
> more information:
> *Corvallis BioBlitz 2019: *
> https://www.facebook.com/events/456973958180457/
> *Corvallis BioBlitz Art Workshop: *
> https://www.facebook.com/events/855459014790395/
>
>
>
>
>
> Josée
>
>
> ______________________________________________
> Josée Rousseau
> PhD Candidate, Dept. Forest Ecosystems and Society
> Oregon State University, Corvallis OR
>
> <josee.rousseau...>
> (541) 286-8617
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #17 in digest
> From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc...>
> Subject: [obol] major passerine flight Immonen Rd clear cut
> Date: Thu, 09 May 2019 12:48:51 -0500
>
> Early this morning I ran into an impressive passerine flight moving
> N/NE over the south-facing section of a clear cutridge off S Immonen
> Road SE of Siletz Bay. The L-shapedridge crest is best accessed from
> the first gate (2440) on thesouth side of Immonen just past milepost
> 2, and walking theuphill forest road keeping to the left at the forks.
> The ridgeruns up to 900+ feet elevation just 2 miles from the
> ocean,and has a broad south-facing saddle at about 850 ft whichmost of
> the birds were passing through/over. InterestinglyTownsend's Warbler
> was by far the most numerous speciesin the flight.
> The flight may have been birds that were pushed to or over the ocean
> by overnight east-component winds compressingnumbers. It rivaled
> (bettered in terms of diversity) anythingI have seen at Cascade Head
> over many years of trying to catch this type of movement there.
> Difficult to capture or convey but definitely one of those moving
> experiences thattranscends finding rare birds.
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56043638
> Phil
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #18 in digest
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 11:25:43 -0700 (PDT)
> From: <clearwater...>
> Subject: [obol] This curious phenomenon called OBOL
>
> I've been subscribed to OBOL on & off for about 20 years. It has been a
> contentious place as long as I can remember.
> Topics of passionate debate in the first decade included global climate
> change, alleged urban head islands, cows and ranchers, photographers
> chasing owls, whether or not Laura Bush was really a birder, whether the
> invasion of Iraq might be beneficial for marsh birds there, whether the
> publication schedule of Oregon Birds was a national disgrace, and whether
> or not naked photos of the OFO president could be expected in the next
> edition.
>
> Here for example is a robust exchange on the first topic, from the
> archives for April 2001:
>
> Birder #1: "I asked a meteorologist acquaintance of mine [OSU faculty
> member] about the subject of polar ice as determined by a submarine
> transect of the Arctic Ocean as a measure of global climate change, and the
> urban "heat island" effect, and these are his answers: ..."
>
> Birder #2: "What does this have to do with birding? Why are you continuing
> this thread? Look ... why not tell everyone that the one true source of
> scientific
> knowledge is www.junkscience.com ... and be done with it? The scientific
> consensus is nearly unanimous on the issue of global warming. The fact that
> you can cherry-pick an opinion from a single friend ... who happens to be a
> faculty member at a second-rate university is hardly a compelling reason to
> ignore that scientific consensus."
>
> Things are a little different now. No one still tries to claim that global
> climate change is a hoax (at least not on this list). No one wonders out
> loud whether the First Lady might be a positive influence on her husband's
> environmental policies. OFO has changed its name to OBA and we seldom hear
> complaints about its internal politics.
>
> But there are still arguments, joined (with passion if not always glee) by
> both long-term and newer subscribers. Some people claim that they don't
> like arguments, but somehow they still want to register their opinions.
> This is also not a new thing.
>
> There are people who assert that OBOL should only be about bird postings
> -- what's been seen and where to find it. But some don't want to hear about
> common backyard birds, just the rarities please! Some want to discuss
> details of bird ID at length. Some want to tout the latest apps. Some want
> to talk about data gathering methods. Some want to talk about bird
> conservation. Some want to talk about county listing accomplishments. Some
> like to reminisce about experiences with old birding buddies.
>
> I'd guess that each of OBOL's 1600+ subscribers would rather not read
> postings in one or more of these categories. And indeed, there are plenty
> of other options. There's eBird for people who just want alerts of rarities
> that they "need" for their county year list. There are a dozen or so local
> birding lists around the state for people who want to share sightings of
> yard birds and other birds of local interest. There are Facebook groups for
> people who just want to share and look at bird photos.
>
> Yet people keep signing up on OBOL, despite these other options. People
> who express dislike for particular topics or the tone of certain
> discussions still stay around, year after year. It's a curious thing --
> what is it that causes OBOL to keep going and even growing, when none of us
> seems to agree entirely on what it should be?
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #19 in digest
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 11:39:26 -0700 (PDT)
> From: <clearwater...>
> Subject: [obol] Late-ish Merlin in Soap Creek Valley north of Corvallis
>
> Yesterday May 8th while driving out the gravel driveway of a site where
> we're monitoring "Oregon" Vesper Sparrows in the Soap Creek Valley north of
> Corvallis, I saw a small, grayish raptor standing in the road. It took off
> and flew south. From the size and powerful falcon-style wingbeats it had to
> be a MERLIN.
> Normally I see a pair of American Kestrels on that stretch of road but
> they must have been keeping a low profile while this sturdier visitor was
> around.
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #20 in digest
> From: "dawn v" <d_villa...>
> Subject: [obol] Off-topic - Tillamook Birder website
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 23:54:58 +0200
>
> Several years ago I (with a couple of other people) set up the website
> http://www.tillamookbirder.com/[1]. For the past few years, I&#39;ve had
> no
> time to work on maintaining it. Now it&#39;s time to renew and I&#39;m
> going
> to let it lapse unless there is someone who is interested in taking it
> over.
> I don&#39;t mind financing it, but not if it&#39;s not going to be updated
> and maintained. If you have time and interest, please contact me
> off-list.
> Thanks! dawn v Lincoln City/Nelscott
> --- Links ---
> 1 http://www.tillamookbirder.com/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #21 in digest
> From: Mary Garrard <springazure1...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 15:38:39 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Pilot Truck Stop exit update (I-5 exit 263)
>
> Hi all. Driving to Portland just now I pulled off at the exit 263/Pilot
> truck stop exit and took a quick look around. About a month ago I had
> noticed that there were Great Blue Heron nests in the cottonwoods on the SE
> corner of that exit and there were raptors, coyotes, and GBH's galore at
> that time.
> The cottonwoods are now completely leafed out. I saw a lone Heron flying
> across the field. There were several raptors perched on fence posts or the
> watering system, including a kestrel and a couple of red-tailed hawks. A
> coyote was getting plenty to eat in the field.
>
> There were lots of cows in the field. I couldn't tell if one dark lump far
> out in the field was a cow lying down sleeping with its ears twitching and
> its tail flicking, or a dead cow with vultures eating lunch.
>
> So, not as birdy as it was a month ago. But still a nice stop. Except for
> the traffic from the freeway and the highway. Fortunately for the GBHs,
> they're well hidden in the leafed-out cottonwoods, so maybe the traffic
> noise isn't a deterrent to their successful nesting.
>
> Happy birding!
>
> Mary
>
>
>
> My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #22 in digest
> From: Mary Garrard <springazure1...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 16:07:08 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Clarification
>
> To be clear, my post about personal snarky jabs the other day was
> apparently misinterpreted. I did not mean to imply in any way that I oppose
> discussions, even animated discussions, about birding topics. What I
> deplore is animated discussions that involve personal snarky jabs. That's
> all.
> I've been thinking a lot about how we communicate online subsequent to
> seeing the responses, both public and private, that I got to that post, and
> what could be best practices to promote respectful communication. The usual
> listserv suggestions to be respectful doesn't seem to work the best...
>
> I've also been thinking about gender differences in communication in the
> context of the internet. Lots of interesting stuff.
>
> I'm going to write up my findings with links to some articles and book
> chapters that I find helpful or interesting. It'll take me a couple of days
> because I'm away from my laptop and I've just scratched the surface of
> what's out there. I'll post it on the BOO listserv with a heads-up here for
> anyone who might be interested.
>
> Happy summer! Oops, I mean happy mid-spring.....
>
> Mary
>
>
>
>
>
>
> My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #23 in digest
> From: Treesa Hertzel <autumn207...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Clarification
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 16:24:57 -0700
>
> Mary et al,
> Mary writes, "The usual listserv suggestions to be respectful doesn't seem
> to work the best…”
>
> When someone posts a message that includes a personal insult to another
> member, I send a message to OBOL stating that personal insults are not
> tolerated, so all of our members know that this is being addressed.
> However, I also write the poster personally and warn him or her that OBOL
> does not tolerate personal insults.
>
> This usually works. In fact, only once in the last five years has a
> situation required me to go one step further, and flag the user as
> “moderated post,” which means that his messages will be moderated by me
> before being sent on to OBOL.
>
> Generally, this is a great group and discussions are welcome. By the way,
> we are three short of 1700 members.
>
> Treesa Hertzel
> OBOL Moderator
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On May 9, 2019, at 4:07 PM, Mary Garrard <springazure1...> wrote:
>
> To be clear, my post about personal snarky jabs the other day was
> apparently misinterpreted. I did not mean to imply in any way that I oppose
> discussions, even animated discussions, about birding topics. What I
> deplore is animated discussions that involve personal snarky jabs. That's
> all.
>
> I've been thinking a lot about how we communicate online subsequent to
> seeing the responses, both public and private, that I got to that post, and
> what could be best practices to promote respectful communication. The usual
> listserv suggestions to be respectful doesn't seem to work the best...
>
> I've also been thinking about gender differences in communication in the
> context of the internet. Lots of interesting stuff.
>
> I'm going to write up my findings with links to some articles and book
> chapters that I find helpful or interesting. It'll take me a couple of days
> because I'm away from my laptop and I've just scratched the surface of
> what's out there. I'll post it on the BOO listserv with a heads-up here for
> anyone who might be interested.
>
> Happy summer! Oops, I mean happy mid-spring.....
>
> Mary
>
>
>
>
>
>
> My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #24 in digest
> From: Mary Garrard <springazure1...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 16:52:10 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Re: Clarification
>
> Glad to know! Thanks for being on the job. It must be thankless, for the
> most part.
>
>
>
>
> My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
>
> On Thu, May 9, 2019, 4:25 PM Treesa Hertzel <autumn207...> wrote:
>
> > Mary et al,
> >
> > Mary writes, "The usual listserv suggestions to be respectful doesn't
> seem
> > to work the best…”
> >
> > When someone posts a message that includes a personal insult to another
> > member, I send a message to OBOL stating that personal insults are not
> > tolerated, so all of our members know that this is being addressed.
> > However, I also write the poster personally and warn him or her that OBOL
> > does not tolerate personal insults.
> >
> > This usually works. In fact, only once in the last five years has a
> > situation required me to go one step further, and flag the user as
> > “moderated post,” which means that his messages will be moderated by me
> > before being sent on to OBOL.
> >
> > Generally, this is a great group and discussions are welcome. By the way,
> > we are three short of 1700 members.
> >
> > Treesa Hertzel
> > OBOL Moderator
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On May 9, 2019, at 4:07 PM, Mary Garrard <springazure1...> wrote:
> >
> > To be clear, my post about personal snarky jabs the other day was
> > apparently misinterpreted. I did not mean to imply in any way that I
> oppose
> > discussions, even animated discussions, about birding topics. What I
> > deplore is animated discussions that involve personal snarky jabs. That's
> > all.
> >
> > I've been thinking a lot about how we communicate online subsequent to
> > seeing the responses, both public and private, that I got to that post,
> and
> > what could be best practices to promote respectful communication. The
> usual
> > listserv suggestions to be respectful doesn't seem to work the best...
> >
> > I've also been thinking about gender differences in communication in the
> > context of the internet. Lots of interesting stuff.
> >
> > I'm going to write up my findings with links to some articles and book
> > chapters that I find helpful or interesting. It'll take me a couple of
> days
> > because I'm away from my laptop and I've just scratched the surface of
> > what's out there. I'll post it on the BOO listserv with a heads-up here
> for
> > anyone who might be interested.
> >
> > Happy summer! Oops, I mean happy mid-spring.....
> >
> > Mary
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
> >
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #25 in digest
> From: Russ Namitz <namitzr...>
> Subject: [obol] OBA Princess Cruise field trip report 5/4-5/6
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 23:54:33 +0000
>
> The Oregon Birding Association field trip for the month of May was aboard
> the Golden Princess, embarking in Los Angeles, CA on 5/4, sailing north and
> disembarking in Vancouver, BC on 5/7.
> We started birding at 6am on 5/6, just barely in Coos County. We had
> unfortunately sailed entirely through Curry County during the dark. We
> ended birding in Oregon around lunchtime at the mouth of the Columbia River.
>
> We encountered ZERO Pterodroma petrels in CA, OR or WA waters. This was
> quite a shock, especially after the spectacular success of a 3 Pterodroma
> trip just days prior on a Holland America cruise.
>
> Highlights for Oregon waters included the usual suite of pelagic birds.
> Large flocks of SOOTY SHEARWATERS occurred in Lincoln County with a few
> SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATERS mixed in. Lincoln also hosted our only TUFTED
> PUFFIN. A male BLACK SCOTER was found way out to sea in Tillamook County
> and 2 RUDDY TURNSTONES flew by in Clatsop.
>
> COOS
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56017798
>
> DOUGLAS
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56017937
>
> LANE
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018012
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018043
>
> LINCOLN
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018188
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018235
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018273
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018306
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018540
>
> TILLAMOOK
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018631
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018690
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018796
>
> CLATSOP
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56018838
>
> You never know what you might find unless you try!
>
> Cheers and good birding,
> Russ Namitz
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #26 in digest
> From: Mike Patterson <celata...>
> Subject: [obol] Another cavity nester quiz
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 17:07:02 -0700
>
> Same as before. Everything you need is in the photo
> --
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Bald Eagles - a gateway bird
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=3709
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #27 in digest
> From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Subject: [obol] Malheur update
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 17:08:02 -0700
>
> The Ground Squirrel Gazette
> May 9, 2019
>
> Today’s highlight was a singing male Tennessee Warbler just behind the HQ
> building. Pics are on eBird, which won’t accept the video. No other changes
> to speak of, actually a rather quiet morning. At least one Hammond’s fly.
> Sharp-shin snagged a cowbird at one of the feeders.
>
> Saw a pic taken of a Long-eared Owl roosting at HQ yesterday. I
> completely missed it.
>
> Afternoon the Tennessee was cooperative east of the deck. A Nashville,
> Orange-crown and Warbling Vireo were in the same area just to confuse
> things. Wind has come up a bit so I may not find much else today.
>
>
>
> Alan Contreras
> <acontrer56...>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> TEMPORARY ADDRESS:
> Malheur NWR
> 36391 Sodhouse Ln
> Princeton OR 97721
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
> http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/edge-of-awe
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #28 in digest
> From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 17:36:27 -0700
> Subject: [obol] South Coast East Wind Extravaganza 5/9/19
>
> No rare bird reports but what a day! I was working down at Floras Lake,
> Curry and we arrived at 0800 to (yes Ed) do some rare plant monitoring. It
> was 60F with a very chilly wind out of NW. Most everyone had heavy coats on
> except for some of the youth crew who probably wear shorts in winter.
> Anyhow at almost exactly 11AM the wind suddenly shifted to ENE and boom, it
> was 80F. Coats were quickly shed!!
> Along with the east winds came a plethora of what I think were painted
> (versus American) ladies and thousands of flying ants. This last until 3PM
> when the offshore winds suddenly busted through and it was back to 60F in a
> snap of a finger. As I walked back to parking area, a 1/4 mile away and
> inland- we were working close to beach, I actually walked back into the 88F
> heat!!
>
> It got up to 91F on drive back to Coos Bay but the office at North Bend was
> about 80F. Old record for Coos Bay for this date is 73F so we safely busted
> it- my wife said it was up to 89 at our house in Coos Bay.
>
> Early on at Floras Lake heard Yellow Warblers singing. Had WW Pee-wee
> singing there two days ago. Also had a bird fly in from ocean that I wish I
> had bins for. Did hear one LAPLAND LONGSPUR call during big heat (which
> also included 20+ mph winds giving us the blast furnace effect).
>
> Super amazing day- temps usually back to normal (60s) after these east wind
> events- on the coast that is.
>
> Maybe there will be some displaced goodies in early AM manana?
>
> Merry migration!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #29 in digest
> From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 17:46:30 -0700
> Subject: [obol] wind
>
> I may have neglected to mention that the e and ne winds here are forecast
> to continue for the better part of a week. There are east and ne winds all
> the way to western Nebraska. In general, this pattern results in a good
> flow of vagrants here.
>
> Alan Contreras
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> Temporary address:
> Malheur NWR
> 36391 Sodhouse Ln
> Princeton OR 97721
>
> <acontrer56...>
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #30 in digest
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 17:58:10 -0700 (PDT)
> From: <clearwater...>
> Subject: [obol] A little more historical perspective
>
> This little trip down memory lane brings up a few more thoughts, not so
> pleasant.
> About 15 or 20 years ago (I forget when but it was not long before I
> joined the OFO board), I walked out to our rural mailbox and found an
> anonymous postcard (on an Audubon-issued card with a Bald Eagle), telling
> me to stop posting reports of non-rare birds on OBOL.
>
> Around the same time, Marilyn Miller received a similar postcard,
> threatening to shoot her pet geese Affie and Fuzzy-Goose if she ever
> mentioned them on OBOL again.
>
> At least one other birder out in Florence received one of these too,
> telling her, "Shut up. You talk too much."
>
> I'm pretty sure I know who sent those cards, based on the sentence
> structure of the note I received. He wasn't a frequent poster and he hasn't
> posted on OBOL for a long, long time. He might even be dead by now, for all
> I know.
>
> Anyway when people worry about the tone of current discussions, this comes
> to mind. I don't worry that much about the people who engage in the
> discussion and sling barbs back and forth. But anyone who thinks this is a
> "safe space" and that things were better in the past should take a reality
> check.
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
> (do you ever wonder why I usually just post my general location rather
> than full address?)
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #31 in digest
> From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 21:44:05 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Finley NWR Trumpeter Swans, Wilson's Phalarope, etc.
>
> Hi all,
> A Wilson's Phalarope was hanging out at the Conservation Wetland on North
> Finley Rd this evening. The two Trumpeter Swans with green neck collars
> (4@2
> and 4@9) continue on Cabell Marsh. And I finally encountered a single
> Yellow-headed Blackbird (singing male) at the Scrape Pond on Bruce Rd.
>
> All in all, a very pleasant evening of birding.
>
> A few photos can be found in the following checklists:
>
> Cabell: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56070048
> Conservation Wetland: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56070141
> Scrape Pond: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56070163
>
> Happy birding
>
> Hendrik
>
> --
> __________________________
> Hendrik G. Herlyn
> Corvallis, OR
>
>
> *"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #32 in digest
> From: "Kay Carter" <KayCarter...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Have you heard this bird?
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 21:47:42 -0700
>
> Yes, I have heard that bird. Or one very like it – back in 2011. Here’s
> the OBOL post I wrote back then:
>
>
> On Jul 4, 2011, at 1:20 PM, Kay Carter wrote:
>
>
>
> On 4/27/11, I first heard a bird song I couldn’t identify in the area of
> north Canby I visit frequently. When I finally tracked it down, I was
> surprised to see a male Common Yellowthroat. Two or three Yellowthroats
> set up territories in the area every year, so that wasn’t odd in itself.
> But this bird was singing a most unyellowthroat-like song.
>
>
>
> This bird is still singing – as is the “normal” Yellowthroat on the
> adjacent territory – and this morning I finally realized that the camcorder
> function on my smart phone might be good enough to capture the song. So, I
> offer this “video.” There’s not much to see – the bird in question is far
> too far from the camera to be seen (but you can detect it flying out of the
> tree and down to the right, which I “expertly” followed with the camera, at
> the end of the clip). It was also uncooperative about having a still photo
> taken. But, if you turn your volume up while playing the clip, you should
> be able to hear its song.
>
>
>
> I am certain that the singer is a Yellowthroat. Since the song is so
> uncharacteristic, and since there’s been so much discussion of hybrid
> warblers on OBOL this spring, I took another good long look at it this
> morning. I was unable to detect any plumage features that seem out of
> place for Yellowthroat, though I will give him high marks for staying far
> away and being well concealed behind leaves and deep in shrubbery. The
> bird is bright yellow below, from throat to undertail coverts, with the
> black “Zorro” mask topped by white. The top of the bird is greenish yellow.
>
>
>
> Here’s the link to the clip: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaycarter/
>
>
>
> I’ll be happy to provide location details to anyone who would like to go
> see and hear this bird for him/herself.
>
>
>
> Kay Carter
>
>
>
>
>
> From: <obol-bounce...> <obol-bounce...> On Behalf Of
> Erick Shore
> Sent: Thursday, May 09, 2019 8:34 AM
> To: <obol...>
> Subject: [obol] Have you heard this bird?
>
>
>
> Hello birders,
>
>
>
> Here's a link to a video that has an unusual song for the species of bird
> making it. Of all the recordings I've heard on the internet of song
> variations within the species I haven't heard one like this at all. I would
> love to hear from some of you more experienced birders what you think of
> this and whether you have heard this species singing this song before? I
> uploaded the videos to be private on YouTube but anyone with the link can
> view them.
>
>
>
> The first link recorded the song really well, but you can't see the bird
> on purpose, it's a test :-). If you click "show more" in the video
> description section I put the species there.
>
>
>
> https://youtu.be/Uv2QSBEeYns
>
>
>
> This second link is to the video that shows the bird. Hopefully you can
> confirm my ID even with the bad video quality.
>
>
>
> https://youtu.be/h2X6DzeKYec
>
>
>
> Happy birding!
>
>
>
> Erick Shore
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #33 in digest
> From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 21:56:09 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Re: Have you heard this bird?
>
> Several years ago, I heard a strange song at Finley NWR that really got my
> pulse rate up - it sounded a lot like a Kentucky Warbler. But when I
> finally tracked the singer down, it turned out to be a Common Yellowthroat.
> Guess they can be quite variable at times.
> Happy ear birding!
>
> Hendrik
>
>
>
> On Thu, May 9, 2019 at 9:48 PM Kay Carter <KayCarter...> wrote:
>
> > Yes, I *have* heard that bird. Or one very like it – back in 2011.
> > Here’s the OBOL post I wrote back then:
> >
> >
> >
> > On Jul 4, 2011, at 1:20 PM, Kay Carter wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> > On 4/27/11, I first heard a bird song I couldn’t identify in the area of
> > north Canby I visit frequently. When I finally tracked it down, I was
> > surprised to see a male Common Yellowthroat. Two or three Yellowthroats
> > set up territories in the area every year, so that wasn’t odd in itself.
> > But this bird was singing a most unyellowthroat-like song.
> >
> >
> >
> > This bird is still singing – as is the “normal” Yellowthroat on the
> > adjacent territory – and this morning I finally realized that the
> camcorder
> > function on my smart phone might be good enough to capture the song.
> So, I
> > offer this “video.” There’s not much to see – the bird in question is
> far
> > too far from the camera to be seen (but you can detect it flying out of
> the
> > tree and down to the right, which I “expertly” followed with the camera,
> at
> > the end of the clip). It was also uncooperative about having a still
> photo
> > taken. But, if you turn your volume up while playing the clip, you
> should
> > be able to hear its song.
> >
> >
> >
> > I am certain that the singer is a Yellowthroat. Since the song is so
> > uncharacteristic, and since there’s been so much discussion of hybrid
> > warblers on OBOL this spring, I took another good long look at it this
> > morning. I was unable to detect any plumage features that seem out of
> > place for Yellowthroat, though I will give him high marks for staying far
> > away and being well concealed behind leaves and deep in shrubbery. The
> > bird is bright yellow below, from throat to undertail coverts, with the
> > black “Zorro” mask topped by white. The top of the bird is greenish
> yellow.
> >
> >
> >
> > Here’s the link to the clip: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaycarter/
> >
> >
> >
> > I’ll be happy to provide location details to anyone who would like to go
> > see and hear this bird for him/herself.
> >
> >
> >
> > Kay Carter
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *From:* <obol-bounce...> <obol-bounce...> *On Behalf
> > Of *Erick Shore
> > *Sent:* Thursday, May 09, 2019 8:34 AM
> > *To:* <obol...>
> > *Subject:* [obol] Have you heard this bird?
> >
> >
> >
> > Hello birders,
> >
> >
> >
> > Here's a link to a video that has an unusual song for the species of bird
> > making it. Of all the recordings I've heard on the internet of song
> > variations within the species I haven't heard one like this at all. I
> would
> > love to hear from some of you more experienced birders what you think of
> > this and whether you have heard this species singing this song before? I
> > uploaded the videos to be private on YouTube but anyone with the link can
> > view them.
> >
> >
> >
> > The first link recorded the song really well, but you can't see the bird
> > on purpose, it's a test :-). If you click "show more" in the video
> > description section I put the species there.
> >
> >
> >
> > https://youtu.be/Uv2QSBEeYns
> >
> >
> >
> > This second link is to the video that shows the bird. Hopefully you can
> > confirm my ID even with the bad video quality.
> >
> >
> >
> > https://youtu.be/h2X6DzeKYec
> >
> >
> >
> > Happy birding!
> >
> >
> >
> > Erick Shore
> >
>
>
> --
> __________________________
> Hendrik G. Herlyn
> Corvallis, OR
>
>
> *"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #34 in digest
> From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 22:04:37 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Birding Cruise Highlights (May 8)
>
> By Skip Russell, Judy Meredith, Sheran Wright, Bob Lockett, Ed McVicker,
> Tom Crabtree, Owen Schmidt, Curtis Marantz, Jim Lomax (three others from
> CA) and I:
>
> Yesterday off Oregon:
>
> 2 Cook’s Petrels
> 2 Hawaiian Petrels
> 4 Murphy’s Petrels
> Etc.
>
> Very strong winds held on to the bow, so not much pitching of the ship.
>
> Details later.
>
> Jeff Gilligan
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #35 in digest
> From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
> Date: Thu, 9 May 2019 22:04:49 -0700
> Subject: [obol] Birding Cruise Highlights (May 8)
>
> By Skip Russell, Judy Meredith, Sheran Wright, Bob Lockett, Ed McVicker,
> Tom Crabtree, Owen Schmidt, Curtis Marantz, Jim Lomax (three others from
> CA) and I:
>
> Yesterday off Oregon:
>
> 2 Cook’s Petrels
> 2 Hawaiian Petrels
> 4 Murphy’s Petrels
> Etc.
>
> Very strong winds held on to the bow, so not much pitching of the ship.
>
> Details later.
>
> Jeff Gilligan
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of obol Digest V8 #137
> **************************
>
>
>

 
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