Date: 5/9/19 9:56 pm
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Have you heard this bird?
Several years ago, I heard a strange song at Finley NWR that really got my
pulse rate up - it sounded a lot like a Kentucky Warbler. But when I
finally tracked the singer down, it turned out to be a Common Yellowthroat.
Guess they can be quite variable at times.

Happy ear birding!

Hendrik



On Thu, May 9, 2019 at 9:48 PM Kay Carter <KayCarter...> wrote:

> Yes, I *have* heard that bird. Or one very like it – back in 2011.
> Here’s the OBOL post I wrote back then:
>
>
>
> On Jul 4, 2011, at 1:20 PM, Kay Carter wrote:
>
>
>
> On 4/27/11, I first heard a bird song I couldn’t identify in the area of
> north Canby I visit frequently. When I finally tracked it down, I was
> surprised to see a male Common Yellowthroat. Two or three Yellowthroats
> set up territories in the area every year, so that wasn’t odd in itself.
> But this bird was singing a most unyellowthroat-like song.
>
>
>
> This bird is still singing – as is the “normal” Yellowthroat on the
> adjacent territory – and this morning I finally realized that the camcorder
> function on my smart phone might be good enough to capture the song. So, I
> offer this “video.” There’s not much to see – the bird in question is far
> too far from the camera to be seen (but you can detect it flying out of the
> tree and down to the right, which I “expertly” followed with the camera, at
> the end of the clip). It was also uncooperative about having a still photo
> taken. But, if you turn your volume up while playing the clip, you should
> be able to hear its song.
>
>
>
> I am certain that the singer is a Yellowthroat. Since the song is so
> uncharacteristic, and since there’s been so much discussion of hybrid
> warblers on OBOL this spring, I took another good long look at it this
> morning. I was unable to detect any plumage features that seem out of
> place for Yellowthroat, though I will give him high marks for staying far
> away and being well concealed behind leaves and deep in shrubbery. The
> bird is bright yellow below, from throat to undertail coverts, with the
> black “Zorro” mask topped by white. The top of the bird is greenish yellow.
>
>
>
> Here’s the link to the clip: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaycarter/
>
>
>
> I’ll be happy to provide location details to anyone who would like to go
> see and hear this bird for him/herself.
>
>
>
> Kay Carter
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <obol-bounce...> <obol-bounce...> *On Behalf
> Of *Erick Shore
> *Sent:* Thursday, May 09, 2019 8:34 AM
> *To:* <obol...>
> *Subject:* [obol] Have you heard this bird?
>
>
>
> Hello birders,
>
>
>
> Here's a link to a video that has an unusual song for the species of bird
> making it. Of all the recordings I've heard on the internet of song
> variations within the species I haven't heard one like this at all. I would
> love to hear from some of you more experienced birders what you think of
> this and whether you have heard this species singing this song before? I
> uploaded the videos to be private on YouTube but anyone with the link can
> view them.
>
>
>
> The first link recorded the song really well, but you can't see the bird
> on purpose, it's a test :-). If you click "show more" in the video
> description section I put the species there.
>
>
>
> https://youtu.be/Uv2QSBEeYns
>
>
>
> This second link is to the video that shows the bird. Hopefully you can
> confirm my ID even with the bad video quality.
>
>
>
> https://youtu.be/h2X6DzeKYec
>
>
>
> Happy birding!
>
>
>
> Erick Shore
>


--
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*

 
Join us on Facebook!