Date: 4/24/19 1:51 pm
From: Lars Norgren <larspernorgren...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Bald Eagle olfactory prowess - further thoughts
Could the eagle be sharing a thermal updraft with the TVs? Maybe it's
checking out the tall Dfir as a potential eyrie. I think Bald Eagles can
spend multiple years committing to a spot . I saw them carrying sticks at
Crystal Springs Rhododendron Gardens three years ago. I hear there's an
actual nest now.

On Wed, Apr 24, 2019, 12:57 PM Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan...>
wrote:

> I’m thinking about this question of a Bald Eagle being able to smell
> carrion. Further thoughts.
>
>
>
> Could it be possible that the eagle had previous experience finding
> carrion at that location?
>
> Could it be possible that the eagle followed the Turkey Vultures to the
> site?
>
>
>
> I checked a few things out.
>
>
>
> First of all, the vultures were not zeroing in on the parking lot this
> morning, they were just wandering about. The eagle came, and they gave it
> room. Then the eagle zeroed in on the parking lot.
>
>
>
> The barbeque pit was not operating this morning.
>
> I rechecked the dumpster and did not find it smelly (I don’t have a very
> good nose.), but my companions assured me it was smelly. What I saw looked
> more like pizza and barbeque waste, not raw meat.
>
>
>
> I asked the folks at the market, and they do indeed butcher meat.
> Attractant is present.
>
> They said they had never seen an eagle or a vulture around the market,
> which points toward no previous experience on the part of the eagle.
>
>
>
> So this points to the eagle finding the site on its own and focusing in on
> the dumpster.
>
>
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
>
>
> *From:* Paul Sullivan [mailto:<paultsullivan...>]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, April 24, 2019 10:52 AM
> *To:* <tlove...>; <atowhee...>; roshana.shockley <
> <roshana.shockley...>
> *Subject:* FW: Bald Eagle olfactory prowess
>
>
>
> I’m acquainted with the experiments that show that Turkey Vultures have a
> keen sense of smell. They can sniff out a putrid carcass hidden under a
> brushpile or otherwise visually obscured. Their method of foraging is to
> get up on the wing, ride the thermals, and pick up scent of rotting flesh.
> They also watch each other, If one bird goes down on something fragrant,
> others follow to participate in the feast. That’s a known story.
>
>
>
> This morning I participated in the Wednesday morning bird walk at Linfield
> College, led by Tom Love. It is right in urban McMinnville. About 8:30 we
> saw one, two, three Turkey Vultures start to get up and moving over the
> area north of campus. Then an adult Bald Eagle joined in. It circled over
> the parking lot between El Rancho Market and St. Vincent’s second-hand
> store. It circled in tighter circles as if it was honing in on something.
> Eventually it landed in a tall Douglas fir. The market has an outdoor
> barbeque setup where they cook meat. We went over to investigate and found
> an open dumpster behind the market with evidence of meat waste.
>
>
>
> We all remarked that we had never seen an eagle right in town like that.
> I went home and checked my records for our Rummel Street address – only a
> couple blocks from Linfield – and found only 3 sightings of Bald Eagle seen
> from this yard. I’m sure they were mainly off over the Yamhill River at
> the edge of town, not over the town itself.
>
>
>
> My question is this. Do eagles have a keen sense of smell like turkey
> vultures? The bird showed clear signs of circling, honing in on that
> parking lot.
>
>
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> McMinnville
>

 
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