Date: 2/5/19 2:22 pm
From: Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller...>
Subject: Re: Use of drones in birding
Wedge-Tailed Eagles routinely “kill” large drones in Australia

Helmut C. Mueller
409 Moonridge Road
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
919-942-4937
<hmueller...>

> On Feb 5, 2019, at 5:02 PM, Len Kopka (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Randy,
>
> I'll answer the easier of your 2 questions.
> Yes, species identified with drone photography would qualify for life list purposes. It's no different than handheld photography on the ground.
>
> I'll let others weigh in on your ethics question.
>
> Len Kopka
>
> On Feb 5, 2019, at 4:32 PM, Randy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Have not read much in the media concerning use of drones for birding, such as flyby snapshots and filming, or even just non-recorded video. This may have been well discussed here and in the literature and I have just simply missed it because I am a more casual birder than some of you more serious types.
>
> My question to the list serve is what are the ethics concerning this, if any have indeed been established? Do species identified with this method qualify as having been observed for life list purposes?
>
> These questions came to mind as I was reading a story on MSN about an osprey in Aruba flying off with an unidentified relatively large blue reef fish of some kind (possible Blue Tang?) with camera apparently looking "eyeball to eyeball' at the same level with the osprey. The story said the observer was shooting from the side of a highway with a hand-held camera, but it raised the question with me about using drones to find many more opportunities for observations. Before anyone jumps on me about this, I've never done it and don't plan to.
>
> Randy Climpson
> Sunset Beach, NC
>

 
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