Date: 1/22/19 7:53 pm
From: Thomas Robben via CTBirds <ctbirds...>
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] one bird ? : 2016 Avon - Curlew Sandpiper?
By the way, it just doesn't look like 100% pure Curlew Sandpiper to me.
It certainly could be a hybrid, such as Frank mentioned.
Meanwhile I just added a few more photos of this gorgeous species at this
site -- enjoy:
https://notes99.blogspot.com/

Tom Robben


On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 5:03 PM Thomas Robben <robben99...> wrote:

> Hello David,
> Are you sure this is one individual and not TWO different birds in your
> several photos, from 2016 ?
> I am looking at your photos for the long legs, the perfectly decurved
> bill, the beautiful body shape, and the usually upswept tail section of a
> typical of curlew sandpiper, and would not bet all my marbles on any of
> these bird(s) combining all those characteristics.
> You can see Harvey Tomlinson's GREAT photo of a curlew sandpiper in NJ if
> you click on this link and scroll down:
> http://notes99.blogspot.com/2011/05/southern-new-jersey.html
>
> Incidentally there was at least one curlew sandpiper in SW NJ in May 2016,
> but if you look at the photos of that bird, on eBird, it does not look
> exactly like your September 2016 bird:
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S29882769
>
> Anyway, that is my two-cents, for what its worth.
> If I had to bet more than that, I would vote against this being a curlew
> sandpiper.
>
> Tom Robben
> Glastonbury CT
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 3:18 PM Frank Mantlik via CTBirds <
> <ctbirds...> wrote:
>
>> Hello David,Thank you for your post about a very interesting shorebird
>> that you observed and photographed in Avon in Sept 2016. Several of the
>> state's top birders saw your eBird list with three photos, and we agree it
>> is an unusual bird. It is clearly not a typical Pectoral Sandpiper, Curlew
>> Sandpiper, nor Dunlin. (The photo of a shorebird by Lea Shaw earlier does
>> look like a Pectoral Sandpiper to me).
>> Several of us think that your bird might be a "Cox's" Sandpiper. This is
>> a little known taxa that was once (1955?) thought to be a new species, but
>> since with the aid of DNA analysis, is described as a hybrid between
>> Pectoral and Curlew Sandpipers. While the photos aren't great, your bird
>> seems to exhibit a decurved, fine-tipped bill (recalling Curlew Sandpiper),
>> a heavily-patterned breast (like Pectoral Sandpiper), and dull
>> greenish/dark legs. Several of us think the bird looks too "leggy" and the
>> bill too uniformly decurved for an aberrant Pectoral.
>> Cox's Sandpiper has occurred in Australia, Japan, and a juvenile from
>> Duxbury Beach, Massachusetts (Sept. 1987- a bird which I chased, but did
>> not see). Another possibility would be Pectoral X Dunlin.
>> I/we would love to see the original photos, if possible. Thanks much for
>> bringing this to our attention. Hopefully others will also chime in
>> On Monday, January 21, 2019, 8:00:06 PM EST, David Lawton via CTBirds
>> <ctbirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Spent a couple hours this evening uploading photos from various birding
>> trips over the past few years and happened upon some ID photos from a bird
>> I believe I misidentified as a Pectoral Sandpiper at Fisher Meadows in
>> September 2016 (light wasn't great and I believe one had been reported
>> there... so I was biased). I took some photos but didn't study them, until
>> this evening.
>>
>> Here is the eBird report, with the photos I uploaded and my thinking re
>> the
>> ID: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S31659641
>> Here is the description based on going through the photos and looking at a
>> lot of books and photos online:
>>
>>
>> I have been adding photos I've taken over the past several years to eBird
>> sightings. When I came upon this bird that I had identified as a Pectoral
>> Sandpiper previously, I realized it didn't look quite right. Even a
>> juvenile Pectoral doesn't have a bill like that. Bill is long and
>> downcurved. Scaly above (unlike Dunlin, and base of bill thinner than
>> Dunlin); stature not like Stilt Sandpiper, and bill not as thick. Bairds
>> would be scaly but not as reddish and would not have quite the long,
>> decurved bill and greater primary projection. Appreciate any comments, but
>> it sure looks like a Curlew Sandpiper to me. The contrasty breast is not
>> typical for Curlew S. but some juveniles have it more than others. Note in
>> one photo (with Semipalmated Sandpiper, the white blotch by the throat, I
>> believe, is a plant and not part of the bird.
>>
>> Would love some input here!
>>
>>
>> David Lawton
>> Avon, CT
>> --
>> D. Lawton
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>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)
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>
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