Date: 1/22/19 9:30 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Waterfowl Sarah P Duke Gardens
Before I address Mute Swans, let's talk about "domestics", since that will doubtless be the next question. Here is a snippet clipped from a longer eBird web page (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_science_the-2Debird-2Dtaxonomy&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CoeOQ1imbKkSMQ75Q014PFXsQH315iD4rYwMh8g8PIg&s=NbEI9pO4wYNhk78LOaYNkV4IynWct0Nw_YrJgCHrjdc&e=) about "domestics". The TL;DR is that if a bird is recognizable as looking different from a wild form, you should report it as a "Domestic type" where that is an option in eBird. If you see a Mallard that looks exactly like a wild Mallard, you should report it as just "Mallard" even if you believe it to be domestic. If it's all white, or otherwise weird-looking, report it as "Mallard (domestic type)".

> Some species such as Mallard, Graylag Goose, or Wild Turkey have a long history of domestication, and their free-flying progeny are sometimes encountered in the field. We allow these birds to be reported in eBird using Mallard (Domestic type), Graylag Goose (Domestic type), and Wild Turkey (Domestic type). Note however that the domestic types in eBird are phenotypes, and thus are field identifiable as birds of domestic origin by virtue of their white plumage, large size, puffy rear ends (e.g., Mallards) or other traits that are not typical of wild populations. This option *should not* be used to report birds that are identical to wild birds but that you presume to be escapees. Importantly, our “domestic type” is a distinct lineage for these birds and not a value judgment of whether you believe it recently escaped from a cage or pen. This is often mis-used in eBird, so please try to understand this distinction before reporting domestic types in eBird. domestics are generally
> not counted on eBird lists, but there are two exceptions. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) is used to represent the wild, free-flying pigeons that occur in cities worldwide, and it distinct from Rock Pigeon (Wild type), which is much rarer and of conservation status in many regions (read more here). Muscovy Duck (Established Feral) is to be used for feral type birds (white, or blotchy, often with oversized red warty protuberances on the face) that are considered established parts of the avifauna in areas such as Florida; the Muscovy Duck is unusual since it also has an option for Muscovy Duck (Domestic type) which does not count on lists but is phenotypically identical.

Cases like Mute Swan (or White-cheeked Pintail, or Mandarin Duck, or...) are more difficult because there aren't morphological differences between captive or wild birds. eBird does allow such birds to be reported, but reviewers will invalidate the records as Introduced/Exotic. "Invalidated" just means that the records are not made visible in normal reports; however the records do remain in the database and could be recovered at a later date in case the species becomes established and there is interest in tracking the history of establishment.


Kent Fiala

On 1/22/2019 11:58 AM, Henry Link wrote:
> How about Mute Swans?
>
> Henry Link
> Greensboro, NC
>
> On Jan 22, 2019, at 11:49 AM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>
>> Please do not think that you can report Muscovy Duck to eBird in Florida. "wild and countable" is an ambiguous description but the issue is clearly dealt with in the article, which you should read.
>>
>> Kent Fiala
>> On 1/22/2019 11:44 AM, scompton1251 wrote:
>>> Muskovies are now considered wild and countable in Florida. Although,they sure are tame there, as opposed to,the very wary ones we saw on the Lower Tio Grande.
>>>
>>> Steve Compton
>>> Greenville, SC
>>>
>>> /Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone/
>>>
>>> ------ Original message------
>>> *From: *Kent Fiala
>>> *Date: *Tue, Jan 22, 2019 10:06 AM
>>> *To: *<carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>;
>>> *Cc: *
>>> *Subject:*Re: Waterfowl Sarah P Duke Gardens
>>>
>>> eBird has a whole page just on Muscovies: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_en_portal_articles_2259953-2Dreporting-2Dmuscovy-2Dducks-2Dto-2Debird&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CoeOQ1imbKkSMQ75Q014PFXsQH315iD4rYwMh8g8PIg&s=chIv_aEct7b9mH_p_8EUb8nijojo-1Owl0Fd1roojL8&e=
>>>
>>> Kent Fiala
>>> On 1/22/2019 9:42 AM, David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>>> A more problematic area is the extent to which free-flying individuals of obviously domestic ancestry should be reported.  Muscovy ducks are breeding around the campus pond at Gardner-Webb and occasionally fly if they have to get somewhere faster than a waddle, but they're brown and white and unquestionably not wild strays from the Rio Grande.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 8:59 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Thanks Kent!  The purpose of eBird is to record data on wild (native and introduced) birds.  Captive, ornamental birds are great to look at and enjoy, but again, please do not eBird these.  This includes the Duke birds, the pintail etc. up near Asheville, birds at the zoo or Sylvan Heights, etc.  Currently eBird does not have a way for the reviewers to automatically remove these known ornamental birds, requiring manual intervention each and every time.
>>>>
>>>> In addition to requiring eBird reviewers to manually invalidate the records, they also feed to national and state rare bird alerts.  This has the effect of making NC look a bit dull when we keep reporting pintail on the national RBA, and could potentially cause someone who has not performed background research to spend money and burn carbon in order to travel to one of these “rarities”, which are in fact ornamental birds purchased and transported to the state for the purpose of enjoyment.
>>>>
>>>> Steve Shultz
>>>>
>>>> Apex NC
>>>>
>>>> *From:*<carolinabirds-request...> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] *On Behalf Of *Kent Fiala
>>>> *Sent:* Tuesday, January 22, 2019 7:10 AM
>>>> *To:* <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
>>>> *Subject:* Re: Waterfowl Sarah P Duke Gardens
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.
>>>>
>>>> Please do not eBird any waterfowl at Duke Gardens. As the eBird reviewer for the area, I invalidate all such reports. Here is the information that I send to people who report from there:
>>>>
>>>> Waterfowl at Duke Gardens are pinioned and are thus considered captive. eBird asks that you don't report captive birds; please see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_portal_articles_973921&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CoeOQ1imbKkSMQ75Q014PFXsQH315iD4rYwMh8g8PIg&s=XDci1Nqn7cCNDZwIfgVgu8ldUWJ-AYw7ePpibDWtMn0&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_portal_articles_973921&d=DwMDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wv6N-L2K3aK6Cfb5kFzXcqGV49Us-MoutKwbc0Ux8Hw&s=kPufnwuZQXjo21HpOfB0R2TeTMOA7knBxfJaVZyQ2gw&e=> (paragraph near the bottom). Thanks.
>>>>
>>>> Also see this video about pinioned birds at Duke Gardens: https://today.duke.edu/2016/03/new-waterfowl-arrive-duke-gardens#video
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately I was a little slow about invalidating some recent reports due to being away on a birding trip, and they remained in the rare bird sightings for a while.
>>>>
>>>> Kent Fiala
>>>>
>>>> On 1/22/2019 4:01 AM, M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Are the waterfowl reported on ebird at the Sarah P Duke Gardens in Durham, NC aviary birds or wild?  My guess is aviary.
>>>>
>>>> Mae Howell
>>>>
>>>> Goldsboro, NC
>>>>
>>>> /Powered by Cricket Wireless/
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr. David Campbell
>>> Associate Professor, Geology
>>> Department of Natural Sciences
>>> Box 7270
>>> Gardner-Webb University
>>> Boiling Springs NC 28017
>

 
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