Date: 1/3/19 9:56 am
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
Subject: [obol] Re: timely reporting of Mockingbirds near Baskett Slough
Wonderful reminder, Paul. The other day I found a phone tree RBA list from the 1970s because I had scribbled an “important number” on it and filed it with bird stuff.

It’s important to remember that not everyone uses the same communication methods. If you find something unusual, make sure the information gets out in as many ways as seems reasonable.


Alan Contreras
<acontrer56...>
Eugene, Oregon

www.alanlcontreras.com

http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/edge-of-awe


> On Jan 3, 2019, at 4:39 AM, Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan...> wrote:
>
> I was birding with Bill Tice on the Dallas CBC last week. He is subscribed to eBird alerts for Polk County, so his phone whistled at him when the Mockingbird was found near the Morgan Lake parking lot. Through the day he was able to text back and forth with birders on the other side of the count circle about what they were seeing, how foggy it was, etc. We got directions to the mockingbird. Instant communication.
>
> It made me think back to when I did the Dallas CBC in the ‘80’s. If you’d found a Mockingbird near Morgan Lake, you would have had to drive to Rickreal to a pay phone. You would have needed several dollars in coin in your pocket or purse to make the call. If you didn’t want to carry that weight, you could keep coins in the ashtray of your car (if no one was a smoker) or the glove compartment – cars didn’t have cup holders.
>
> You would have hoped that the person you called was home. Not everyone had answering machines. The Macintosh computer hadn’t been invented. Apple machines didn’t format five-inch floppy discs the same was as IBM machines. The two systems barely communicated – certainly not over a wire, let alone wireless.
>
> You might have called Roy Gerig or Bill Tice, but you also might have called Walt Yungen, Jack Corbet, Barb Belllin, Floyd Schock, Gerrry Smith, or Dave Copeland – names you will see in the Listing Results when we get them compiled again this year.
>
> For the teen birder connected instantly to people across a CBC circle, 36 years is two lifetimes ago. To me it is half a lifetime.
>
> Perhaps in 2060, Isaac Denzer will have a chip that he carries on him that he can touch and ask, “Tell me all the Mockingbird sightings near Morgan Lake” and it will list them out for him. He can remember when he found the first one back in ’18. The chip may even help him remember the last name of that kid, Caleb, he birded with that day. He may wonder what ever happened to him, or maybe they’ll still be birding together, remembering ‘18.
>
> Who knows what the teen birder of 2060 will say to that?
>
> Happy remembering – and timely reporting,
>
> Paul Sullivan


 
Join us on Facebook!