Date: 11/26/18 9:35 am
From: Kenneth Kinman <kinman...>
Subject: Re: Evening Grosbeaks and other winter irruptive species
Dear All,
I was surprised to see two maps which showed a very steep decline in Evening Grosbeak sightings in the central Rocky Mountain states in 2001-2006 compared with 1989-1994. Especially in Wyoming (and Colorado):
https://feederwatch.org/learn/articles/evening-grosbeaks-population-fluctuations/
The higher numbers during the 20th Century may have been largely due to outbreaks of spruce budworm, so aerial spraying for spruce budworm is no doubt reducing that source of food. And climate warming may also have a gradual impact as well. Whatever the causes of their decline, we will likely never again see the numbers we did during the 20th Century.
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Evening_Grosbeak/lifehistory
http://blog.aba.org/2012/03/what-is-happening-to-evening-grosbeaks.html
https://abcbirds.org/bird/evening-grosbeak/

-------------Ken Kinman, Hays, Kansas
P.S. The following blogpost has a nice map of the 5 types of Evening Grosbeak:
http://blog.aba.org/2012/12/five-species-of-evening-grosbeakslets-find-out-together.html


________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas <KSBIRD-L...> on behalf of Chuck Otte <cotte...>
Sent: Monday, November 26, 2018 9:26 AM
To: <KSBIRD-L...>
Subject: Evening Grosbeaks and other winter irruptive species

Good morning KSBIRDers!

I hope everyone survived the Sunday snow storm safely. I'm glad I had no
place I needed to go.

Early last week we were having a discussion about Evening Grosbeaks and
where their origin was when they irrupted into Kansas. I posed the
question to Mark Robbins, who is likely as knowledgeable about these
things as anyone. For those who don't know Mark he is the ornitholgical
collections manager for University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute. Here
is what he told me:

"It looks like Evening (very likely Pine) Grosbeaks & Red-breasted
Nuthatches are coming from Canada and not the Rockies, whereas the
majority (Type 2) of Red Crossbills are coming out of the Rockies."

He provided further evidence of declining numbers of Evening Grosbeaks in
Missouri and Kansas corresponding with declining numbers in the eastern US
which we know are coming down from Canada so that's a good enough answer
for me.

Mark has also written a great book: "The Status and Distribution of Birds
in Missouri" which is available as a free PDF download at:

https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/26287

Worth the time to download and have handy on your computer.

Chuck

-----
Chuck Otte <cotte...>
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28 785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028 FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

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